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#ActualOlliepm

Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:10 PM

Blowing my mind over here! I would love to know the answer to this haha! So if you have a 9-5 job and have a DAW at work, do you still need a studio at home?

The only reason I mentioned 9-5 jobs was so you didn't have to calculate in-calculable figures based on freelance work!  If your project is going to based on hypothetical figures, then a little rounding off the numbers won't hurt, but basing figures on freelance might make your work more difficult than it needs to be.  Okay, it doesn't seem like that advice helps with your specific project.  When you say 'home studio', do you simply mean a setup for recording and producing audio, or do you mean the kind of thing Dave Grohl has in his house?  'Home studio' often refers to a very basic set up (pair of stereo monitors, computer w/DAW software, recording interface, and perhaps some microphones).  You couldn't do freelance audio work without a basic set up such as that, and I imagine it would be rare for someone to get a nine to five DAW gig without previously owning a DAW, so yeah, they would have a 'home studio' too, in all probability.  

 

Setting up a professional level home studio i.e a room built for that purpose, plus all equipment would be much more expensive.  You'd need proper acoustic treatment for the room, which involves mathematics relating to the volume of the room, and the sound absorption properties of the surfaces in the room, sound proofing etc so you'd most likely be hypothetically hiring people (acoustic engineers) to do this work for you, meaning more hypothetical costs.  Do we have an infinite hypothetical budget?  If you had the nine to five job, costs of living would still seriously limit the amount of money you have left over for a home studio, at the end of the day.  Based on a typical salary, you could estimate your MINIMUM income after a year, while adding a potential range of profits based on freelance, as well.  I'm not sure how 'true to life' you need to be, mind you.

 

I'm also wondering if you have a word count, or anything indicative of the scale of this paper?  

 

 

And hey I fully think being too hot is an excuse for anything. Native San Franciscan here though, man do I hate the heat.

I live in Scotland.  Seeing the sun is as frequent here as a solar eclipse, so I fry very easily!

 

I'd like to let you know that I am a student too, studying sound production at a similar level to you, and have been tasked with somewhat similar projects/papers, and that's why I thought I might be able to relate to this.  The other members of this forum who have been replying to you are top dogs though, so take everything I say with a pinch of salt!  Their word is law.  Speaking as an Asipe though, if it doesn't make sense to me, it doesn't make sense - period tongue.png


#1Olliepm

Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:07 PM

Blowing my mind over here! I would love to know the answer to this haha! So if you have a 9-5 job and have a DAW at work, do you still need a studio at home?

The only reason I mentioned 9-5 jobs was so you didn't have to calculate in-calculable figures based on freelance work!  If your project is going to based on hypothetical figures, then a little rounding off the numbers won't hurt, but basing figures on freelance might make your work more difficult than it needs to be.  Okay, it doesn't seem like that advice helps with your specific project.  When you say 'home studio', do you simple mean a setup for recording and producing audio, or do you mean the kind of think Dave Grohl has in his house?  'Home studio' often refers to a very basic set up (pair of stereo monitors, computer w/DAW software, recording interface, and perhaps some microphones.  You couldn't do freelance audio work without a basic set up such as that, and I imagine it would be rare for someone to get a nine to five DAW gig without previously owning a DAW, so yeah, they would have a 'home studio' too, in all probability.  

 

Setting up a professional level home studio i.e a room built for that purpose, plus all equipment would be much more expensive.  You'd need proper acoustic treatment for the room, which involves mathematics relating to the volume of the room, and the sound absorption properties of the surfaces in the room, sound proofing etc so you'd most likely be hypothetically hiring people (acoustic engineers) to do this work for you, meaning more hypothetical costs.  Do we have an infinite hypothetical budget?  If you had the nine to five job, costs of living would still seriously limit the amount of money you have left over for a home studio, at the end of the day.  Based on a typical salary, you could estimate your MINIMUM income after a year, while adding a potential range of profits based on freelance, as well.  I'm not sure how 'true to life' you need to be, mind you.

 

I'm also wondering if you have a word count, or anything indicative of the scale of this paper?  

 

 

And hey I fully think being too hot is an excuse for anything. Native San Franciscan here though, man do I hate the heat.

I live in Scotland.  Seeing the sun is as frequent here as a solar eclipse, so I fry very easily!

 

I'd like to let you know that I am a student too, studying sound production at a similar level to you, and have been tasked with somewhat similar projects/papers, and that's why I thought I might be able to relate to this.  The other members of this forum who have been replying to you are top dogs though, so take everything I say with a pinch of salt!  Their word is law.  Speaking as an Asipe though, if it doesn't make sense to me, it doesn't make sense - period :P


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