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#ActualJeremy Williams

Posted 12 May 2013 - 03:32 AM

If you write feedback welcome, it is a bit hard to give you feedback. Like somebody gives you a story excerpt and asks: "What do you think?". It isn't easy to give specific answers to general questions.

 

I am well aware of this.

 

About your System:

I think you made a solution for a problem you still have to find. I don't get why it should be for multiple genres. On the surface, different genres seem to have similar leveling systems, but they can serve a vastly different purpose, solve a completely different problem.

 

The reason it needs to be for multiple genres is because there are multiple game designs I have that are in entirely different literary genres. One is a high fantasy, one is a space sci-fi and one is a near future and alternate history sci-fi.Even in terms of gameplay, with the setting ignored completely, they're very different games. The fantasy is a singleplayer arena combat sim, basically a sports game with swords and spells. The space sci-fi is a multiplayer only RPG/shooter, and the near-future sci-fi (the only one I've gone into any depth on here) is a single-player RPG/shooter with linear missions connected by a small open overworld map.  I want the one system to work for them all, despite their differences.

 

You made an elaborate system and I haven't read what you want to do with it, how it should interact with other systems to form a specific experience. So I think as a learning task, this was very good. It sure as hell wasn't easy coming up with this system. Also, it can serve as an inspirational well for future leveling systems. But I don't think you should implement it as it is in any game, because there you have a specific problem to solve.

 

If you're referring to why it should be multi-genre, no I don't. If you're not, you neglected to mention what problem you are referring to.

 

On a general note, your system seems very complex, I guess for giving the player enough choices and replay value. But a system doesn't need to be complex to allow a lot of depth: Extra Creditz depth vs complexity

 

The system is "complex" in a number of ways for a number of reasons. The big one is the three level types, as far as I see. It has three level types to allow for different levelling strategies, and to reward each strategy differently. This shapes the player's character in a manner that suits their method.

 

Casual player: Just want to play the quests without worrying about any extras? Your character will gain a plenty of XP and just enough skill and attributes to get by, which fits because you clearly just playing the game as an experience, you're not there to learn anything and you aren't doing any serious work. And you know what? I appreciate that. The only reason experience levels exist is so you can do that.

 

Power leveller: Want to seek out training, skill items and other easy increases? Your character will get good skill progression, but not much experience or attribute progression, which fits because you are also using something apart from the main experience you had to learn about that doesn't involve much serious work. It's a good idea and a good strategy, but the way it doesn't work for everything is quite intentional. You'll have to mix it with other things to build more than just skills.

 

Grinder: Want to grind levels the slow, old-fashioned way? Your character will get good ability progression but not much experience and skill progression. This fits because you are just doing work. Then again, some people like it. Some people like to just run around and kill things, that's their idea of a good time. In games like this they usually attach a little bit more thought to it and find amusing things little challenges like killing zombies with as many different things as possible. Doesn't change it still being work, but challenges do count towards XP and many of the things they'd be doing are worth more skill points, so as long as it's not completely mindless they'll gain something besides attribute points.


#2Jeremy Williams

Posted 12 May 2013 - 03:26 AM

If you write feedback welcome, it is a bit hard to give you feedback. Like somebody gives you a story excerpt and asks: "What do you think?". It isn't easy to give specific answers to general questions.

I am well aware of this.

About your System:

I think you made a solution for a problem you still have to find. I don't get why it should be for multiple genres. On the surface, different genres seem to have similar leveling systems, but they can serve a vastly different purpose, solve a completely different problem.

The reason it needs to be for multiple genres is because there are multiple game designs I have that are in entirely different literary genres. One is a high fantasy, one is a space sci-fi and one is a near future and alternate history sci-fi.Even in terms of gameplay, with the setting ignored completely, they're very different games. The fantasy is a singleplayer arena combat sim, basically a sports game with swords and spells. The space sci-fi is a multiplayer only RPG/shooter, and the near-future sci-fi (the only one I've gone into any depth on here) is a single-player RPG/shooter with linear missions connected by a small open overworld map.  I want the one system to work for them all, despite their differences.

You made an elaborate system and I haven't read what you want to do with it, how it should interact with other systems to form a specific experience. So I think as a learning task, this was very good. It sure as hell wasn't easy coming up with this system. Also, it can serve as an inspirational well for future leveling systems. But I don't think you should implement it as it is in any game, because there you have a specific problem to solve.

If you're referring to why it should be multi-genre, no I don't. If you're not, you neglected to mention what problem you are referring to.

On a general note, your system seems very complex, I guess for giving the player enough choices and replay value. But a system doesn't need to be complex to allow a lot of depth: Extra Creditz depth vs complexity

The system is "complex" in a number of ways for a number of reasons. The big one is the three level types, as far as I see. It has three level types to allow for different levelling strategies, and to reward each strategy differently. This shapes the player's character in a manner that suits their method.

 

Just want to play the quests without worrying about any extras? Your character will gain a plenty of XP and just enough skill and attributes to get by, which fits because you clearly just in it for the experience and are also only doing just enough to get by. 

 

Want to seek out training, skill items and other easy increases? Your character will get good skill progression, but not much experience or attribute progression, which fits because you are also using something apart from the main experience you had to learn about that doesn't involve much serious work.

 

Want to grind levels the slow, old-fashioned way? Your character will get good ability progression but not much experience and skill progression. This fits because you are just doing work. Then again, some people like it. Some people like to just run around and kill things, that's their idea of a good time. In games like this they usually attach a little bit more thought to it and find amusing things little challenges like killing zombies with as many different things as possible. Doesn't change it still being work, but challenges do count towards XP and many of the things they'd be doing are worth more skill points, so as long as it's not completely mindless they'll gain something besides attribute points.


#1Jeremy Williams

Posted 12 May 2013 - 03:25 AM

If you write feedback welcome, it is a bit hard to give you feedback. Like somebody gives you a story excerpt and asks: "What do you think?". It isn't easy to give specific answers to general questions.

I am well aware of this.

About your System:

I think you made a solution for a problem you still have to find. I don't get why it should be for multiple genres. On the surface, different genres seem to have similar leveling systems, but they can serve a vastly different purpose, solve a completely different problem.

The reason it needs to be for multiple genres is because there are multiple game designs I have that are in entirely different literary genres. One is a high fantasy, one is a space sci-fi and one is a near future and alternate history sci-fi.Even in terms of gameplay, with the setting ignored completely, they're very different games. The fantasy is a singleplayer arena combat sim, basically a sports game with swords and spells. The space sci-fi is a multiplayer only RPG/shooter, and the near-future sci-fi (the only one I've gone into any depth on here) is a single-player RPG/shooter with linear missions connected by a small open overworld map.  I want the one system to work for them all, despite their differences.

You made an elaborate system and I haven't read what you want to do with it, how it should interact with other systems to form a specific experience. So I think as a learning task, this was very good. It sure as hell wasn't easy coming up with this system. Also, it can serve as an inspirational well for future leveling systems. But I don't think you should implement it as it is in any game, because there you have a specific problem to solve.

If you're referring to why it should be multi-genre, no I don't. If you're not, you neglected to mention what problem you are referring to.

On a general note, your system seems very complex, I guess for giving the player enough choices and replay value. But a system doesn't need to be complex to allow a lot of depth: Extra Creditz depth vs complexity

The system is "complex" in a number of ways for a number of reasons. It has three level types to allow for different levelling strategies, and to reward each strategy differently. This shapes the player's character in a manner that suits their method.

 

Just want to play the quests without worrying about any extras? Your character will gain a plenty of XP and just enough skill and attributes to get by, which fits because you clearly just in it for the experience and are also only doing just enough to get by. 

 

Want to seek out training, skill items and other easy increases? Your character will get good skill progression, but not much experience or attribute progression, which fits because you are also using something apart from the main experience you had to learn about that doesn't involve much serious work.

 

Want to grind levels the slow, old-fashioned way? Your character will get good ability progression but not much experience and skill progression. This fits because you are just doing work. Then again, some people like it. Some people like to just run around and kill things, that's their idea of a good time. In games like this they usually attach a little bit more thought to it and find amusing things little challenges like killing zombies with as many different things as possible. Doesn't change it still being work, but challenges do count towards XP and many of the things they'd be doing are worth more skill points, so as long as it's not completely mindless they'll gain something besides attribute points.


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