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#ActualAnri

Posted 12 May 2013 - 05:35 PM

I've experienced burn-out recently by losing sleep over which 3D software to use.

I do have past experience with both Max and Maya, but I'm currently using Silo & Blender for my projects. I just cannot afford either Max or Maya, so I'm pretty much going with the attitude that I'm a programmer first and an artist second, and that it doesn't matter what I'm using at this stage so long as it gets the job done.

Now I don't feel so stressed out and its business as usual.


#3Anri

Posted 12 May 2013 - 05:35 PM

I've experienced burn-out recently by losing sleep over which 3D software to use.

I do have past experience with both Max and Maya, but I'm currently using Silo & Blender for my projects.  I just cannot afford either Max or Maya, so I'm pretty much going with the attitude that I'm a programmer first and an artist second, and that it doesn't matter what I'm using at this stage so long as it gets the job done.

Now I don't feel so stressed out and its business as usual.


#2Anri

Posted 12 May 2013 - 05:32 PM

<p>I've&nbsp;experienced burn-out recently by&nbsp;losing sleep over which 3D software to use.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>I do have past experience with both Max and Maya, but I'm currently using Silo &amp; Blender for my projects.&nbsp; I just cannot afford either Max or Maya, so I'm pretty much going with the attitude that I'm a programmer first and an artist second, and that it doesn't matter what I'm using at this stage so long as it gets the job done.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Now I don't feel so stressed out and its business as usual.</p>

#1Anri

Posted 12 May 2013 - 03:27 PM

I find I burn myself out for two reasons...

 

1) Been at it 24/7, and not knowing when to call it an evening.  You are on a roll and "can't stop now".  Programming can be addictive when its going your way and that program is almost building itself...

 

2) You find yourself out of your depth and not knowing which way to turn, so you feel you cannot quit until you have the situation under control. This is a problem because sometimes, you need to stop and consider whether you need more education in your problem area or maybe just a better idea as to how to approach it.

 

 

For the first, one has to bare in mind that if you are on a roll - then you can sleep safely in the knowledge that tomorrows work will be fairly straight froward. So, save your work and call it a night. You then go into the next day with a positive attitude.  If its 2am in the morning and you are going at it like a runaway train and then you hit a nasty bug or issue, then you are dealing with a problem when you are at your most fatigued. Before you know it, you're up til 4am stewing over it.  But if you had sensibly called it a night and resumed the next day, you would be dealing with that problem refreshed and with good concentration - you might even anticipate the problem before you get to it, so you don't find yourself completely with your pants down...

 

For the second, one needs to just make it clear as to what the issue is that is driving you mad and draining your creative energy - which results in burn out.  A good programmer, with the luxury of time before a project, will look into what the most demanding technicalities that the project will throw at them.  The programmer will solve them before the project starts.  For example, if the project is your first network game, and you know little about network and distributed systems, then you need to either read a book or take a course on the subject, or even converse with another programmer who is knowledgeable in such matters.  If you start a project with the feeling "I can apply this to my games..." then you are doing well, but if you go in with "we'll cross that bridge when we come to it..." then alarm bells should be ringing...

 

Managing and scheduling your projects is a skill worth learning as it reduces unnecessary stress and hardship. And include sleep and breaks into your scheduling! ^_^


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