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#Actualshadowisadog

Posted 19 May 2013 - 09:03 PM

Code Academy should provide a decent start and get you going with some basic programming exercises.

 

I would recommend to anyone that you start with the basics of programming before trying to write a game. Games are software, and learning the language makes the process of creating a game less stressful.

 

Then there is How to Think Like a Computer Scientist : Learning With Python

 

A note is that there is Python 2.x and Python 3.x. Python 3 is the future of the Python language and plenty of packages are available for it. I currently use Python 2.7. Learning Python 3 may be something you wish to consider, but the basics should be fairly similar if not identical. Here is the Python 3 version of How to Think Like a Computer Scientist.

 

So my advice would be to practice some basic programming and get used to writing programs. Try to build up your programming skills before tackling a game project. If you go into starting to make a game with some knowledge of variables, loops, file IO, object oriented programming, data structures, and possibly even design patterns then you are going to have a much stronger starting point than trying to learn as you go in the context of making a game.

 

Once you have done all of that then I might recommend Writing a game in Python using Pygame and Invent with Python although keep in mind that these two links are going to delve into some pretty advanced stuff rather quickly. It is ok to feel a bit lost when looking at these references especially if you ignore my advice to learn the basics of Python first!

 

After you have done ALL of that then you may want to look into Tiled for creating levels for your game.

 

A final note is that... Be aware that (and this goes for any one in the future reading this) that the journey of game development and learning how to write both games and software is a long one. Don't expect to be good at it overnight. I have been programming for over a decade and I still learn new things on a daily basis!


#8shadowisadog

Posted 19 May 2013 - 09:00 PM

Code Academy should provide a decent start and get you going with some basic programming exercises.

 

I would recommend to anyone that you start with the basics of programming before trying to write a game. Games are software, and learning the language makes the process of creating a game less stressful.

 

Then there is How to Think Like a Computer Scientist : Learning With Python

 

A note is that there is Python 2.x and Python 3.x. Python 3 is the future of the Python language and plenty of packages are available for it. I currently use Python 2.7. Learning Python 3 may be something you wish to consider, but the basics should be fairly similar if not identical. Here is the Python 3 version of How to Think Like a Computer Scientist.

 

So my advice would be to practice some basic programming and get used to writing programs. Try to build up your programming skills before tackling a game project. If you go into starting to make a game with some knowledge of variables, loops, file IO, object oriented programming, data structures, and possibly even design patterns then you are going to have a much stronger starting point than trying to learn as you go in the context of making a game.

 

Once you have done all of that then I might recommend Writing a game in Python using Pygame and Invent with Python although keep in mind that these two links are going to delve into some pretty advanced stuff rather quickly. It is ok to feel a bit lost when looking at these references especially if you ignore my advice to learn the basics of Python first!

 

A final note is that... Be aware that (and this goes for any one in the future reading this) that the journey of game development and learning how to write both games and software is a long one. Don't expect to be good at it overnight. I have been programming for over a decade and I still learn new things on a daily basis!


#7shadowisadog

Posted 19 May 2013 - 08:58 PM

Code Academy should provide a decent start and get you going with some basic programming exercises.

 

I would recommend to anyone that you start with the basics of programming before trying to write a game. Games are software, and learning the language makes the process of creating a game less stressful.

 

Then there is How to Think Like a Computer Scientist : Learning With Python

 

A note is that there is Python 2.x and Python 3.x. Python 3 is the future of the Python language and plenty of packages are available for it. I currently use Python 2.7. Learning Python 3 may be something you wish to consider, but the basics should be fairly similar if not identical. Here is the Python 3 version of How to Think Like a Computer Scientist.

 

So my advice would be to practice some basic programming and get used to writing programs. Try to build up your programming skills before tackling a game project. If you go into starting to make a game with some knowledge of variables, loops, file IO, object oriented programming, data structures, and possibly even design patterns then you are going to have a much stronger starting point than trying to learn as you go in the context of making a game.

 

Once you have done all of that then I might recommend Writing a game in Python using Pygame and Invent with Python although keep in mind that these two links are going to delve into some pretty advanced stuff rather quickly. It is ok to feel a bit lost when looking at these references especially if you ignore my advice to learn the basics of Python first!


#6shadowisadog

Posted 19 May 2013 - 08:57 PM

Code Academy should provide a decent start and get you going with some basic programming exercises.

 

I would recommend to anyone that you start with the basics of programming before trying to write a game. Games are software, and learning the language makes the process of creating a game less stressful.

 

Then there is How to Think Like a Computer Scientist : Learning With Python

 

A note is that there is Python 2.x and Python 3.x. Python 3 is the future of the Python language and plenty of packages are available for it. I currently use Python 2.7. Learning Python 3 may be something you wish to consider, but the basics should be fairly similar if not identical. Here is the Python 3 version of How to Think Like a Computer Scientist.

 

So my advice would be to practice some basic programming and get used to writing programs. Try to build up your programming skills before tackling a game project. If you go into starting to make a game with some knowledge of variables, loops, file IO, object oriented programming, data structures, and possibly even design patterns then you are going to have a much stronger starting point than trying to learn as you go in the context of making a game.

 

Once you have done all of that then I might recommend Writing a game in Python using Pygame and Invent with Python.


#5shadowisadog

Posted 19 May 2013 - 08:54 PM

Code Academy should provide a decent start and get you going with some basic programming exercises.

 

I would recommend to anyone that you start with the basics of programming before trying to write a game. Games are software, and learning the language makes the process of creating a game less stressful.

 

Then there is How to Think Like a Computer Scientist : Learning With Python

 

A note is that there is Python 2.x and Python 3.x. Python 3 is the future of the Python language and plenty of packages are available for it. I currently use Python 2.7. Learning Python 3 may be something you wish to consider, but the basics should be fairly similar if not identical. Here is the Python 3 version of How to Think Like a Computer Scientist.

 

So my advice would be to practice some basic programming and get used to writing programs. Try to build up your programming skills before tackling a game project. If you go into starting to make a game with some knowledge of variables, loops, file IO, object oriented programming, data structures, and possibly even design patterns then you are going to have a much stronger starting point than trying to learn as you go in the context of making a game.

 

Once you have done all of that then I might recommend Writing a game in Python using Pygame.


#4shadowisadog

Posted 19 May 2013 - 08:52 PM

Code Academy should provide a decent start and get you going with some basic programming exercises.

 

I would recommend to anyone that you start with the basics of programming before trying to write a game. Games are software, and learning the language makes the process of creating a game less stressful.

 

Then there is How to Think Like a Computer Scientist : Learning With Python

 

A note is that there is Python 2.x and Python 3.x. Python 3 is the future of the Python language and plenty of packages are available for it. I currently use Python 2.7. Learning Python 3 may be something you wish to consider, but the basics should be fairly similar if not identical. Here is the Python 3 version of How to Think Like a Computer Scientist.

 

So my advice would be to practice some basic programming and get used to writing programs. Try to build up your programming skills before tackling a game project. If you go into starting to make a game with some knowledge of variables, loops, file IO, object oriented programming, data structures, and possibly even design patterns then you are going to have a much stronger starting point than trying to learn as you go in the context of making a game.


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