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#ActualReflexus

Posted 24 May 2013 - 03:11 PM

I've been keeping an eye on the real world... hah. I noticed that, appart from subtle HDR-ish effects, this generic term, "bloom," is really caused by -- if I can find the correct word -- aberration. I find a lot of chromatic distortion, and it's mostly like a specular phenomenon. I don't see this kind of bloom bleeding around the windows, or at the horizon unless I'm in a comparatively dark room (i.e. HDR is at work, with a much more subtle kind of "bloom") To speak roughly in graphical terms (meh), this definitely is not screen-space. It's like when light is diffracted within a semi-transparent layer of a material -- most strong along tangents (towards camera) -- it appears to exit such a surface with various distortions; i.e. chromatic aberration not occuring with a subject medium being a lense -- as I was introduced to it -- but a surface in "the world."


#4Reflexus

Posted 24 May 2013 - 03:10 PM

I've been keeping an eye on the real world... hah. I noticed that, appart from subtle HDR-ish effects, this generic term, "bloom," is really caused by -- if I can find the correct word -- aberration. I find a lot of chromatic distortion, and it's mostly like a specular phenomenon. I don't see this kind of bloom bleeding around the windows, or at the horizon unless I'm in a comparatively dark room (i.e. HDR is at work, with a much more subtle kind of "bloom") To speak roughly in graphical terms (meh), this definitely is not screen-space. It's like when light is diffracted within a semi-transparent layer of a material -- most strong along tangents (towards camera) -- it appears to exit such a surface with various distortions; i.e. chromatic abberation not occuring with a subject medium being a lense -- as I was introduced to it -- but a surface in "the world."


#3Reflexus

Posted 24 May 2013 - 12:23 AM

I've been keeping an eye on the real world... hah. I noticed that, appart from subtle HDR-ish effects, this generic term, "bloom," is really caused by -- if I can find the correct word -- abberation. I find a lot of chromatic distortion, and it's mostly like a specular phenomenon. I don't see this kind of bloom bleeding around the windows, or at the horizon unless I'm in a comparatively dark room (i.e. HDR is at work, with a much more subtle kind of "bloom") To speak roughly in graphical terms (meh), this definitely is not screen-space. It's like when light is diffracted within a semi-transparent layer of a material -- most strong along tangents (towards camera) -- it appears to exit such a surface with various distortions; i.e. chromatic abberation not occuring with a subject medium being a lense -- as I was introduced to it -- but a surface in "the world."


#2Reflexus

Posted 24 May 2013 - 12:22 AM

I've been keeping an eye on the real world... hah. I noticed that, appart from subtle HDR-ish effects, this generic term, "bloom," is really caused by -- if I can find the correct word -- abberation. I find a lot of chromatic distortion, and it's mostly like a specular phenomenon. I don't see this kind of bloom bleeding around the windows, or at the horizon unless I'm in a comparatively dark room (i.e. HDR is at work, with a much more subtle kind of "bloom") This definitely is not screen-space. It's like when light is diffracted within a semi-transparent layer of a material -- most strong along tangents (towards camera) -- it appears to exit such a surface with various distortions; i.e. chromatic abberation not occuring with a subject medium being a lense -- as I was introduced to it -- but a surface in "the world."


#1Reflexus

Posted 24 May 2013 - 12:20 AM

I've been keeping an eye on the real world... hah. I noticed that, appart from subtle HDR-ish effects, this generic term, "bloom," is really caused by -- if I can find the correct word -- abberation. I find a lot of chromatic distortion, and it's mostly like a specular phenomenon. I don't see this kind of bloom bleeding around the windows, or at the horizon unless I'm in a comparatively dark room (i.e. HDR is at work, with a much more subtle kind of "bloom") This definitely is not screen-space. It's like when light is diffracted within a semi-transparent layer of a material -- most strong along tangents (towards camera) -- it appears to exit such a surface with various distortions; i.e. chromatic abberation not occuring with a subject medium being a lense -- as I was introduced to it -- but a surface in the world, beyond the perceiver.


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