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#ActualReflexus

Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:34 PM

"diffraction within the sub-layers of surfaces"? Chromatic aberration is a property of the observer's lens, not of the scene itself

 

Subtle caustics which look like chromatic aberration. Specifically, these "caustics" don't necessarily become effectively evident after reflecting off another surface, but instead they directly hit the eye. I know I'm not using any terms correctly, but at the moment I'm not really focused on exactly what to call it.

 

The only thing that appears unnatural to me (besides the subtle halos left where you removed the flares) is that the little puddle of water middle-left seems unnaturally dim.

 

Yes, I did notice I messed that up and I soon fixed it after uploading the picture you see there. Since you've already noticed yourself, I won't upload the fixed version.


#5Reflexus

Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:31 PM

"diffraction within the sub-layers of surfaces"? Chromatic aberration is a property of the observer's lens, not of the scene itself

 

Subtle caustics which look like chromatic aberration. Specifically, these "caustics" don't necessarily become effectively evident after reflecting off another surface, but instead they directly hit the eye. And I know I'm not using any terms correctly, but at the moment I'm not really focused on exactly what to call it.

 

The only thing that appears unnatural to me (besides the subtle halos left where you removed the flares) is that the little puddle of water middle-left seems unnaturally dim.

 

Yes, I did notice I messed that up and I soon fixed it after uploading the picture you see there. Since you've already noticed yourself, I won't upload the fixed version.


#4Reflexus

Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:29 PM

"diffraction within the sub-layers of surfaces"? Chromatic aberration is a property of the observer's lens, not of the scene itself

 

Subtle caustics which look like chromatic aberration. Specifically, these "caustics" don't necessarily become effectively evident after reflecting off another surface, but instead they directly hit the eye. And I know I'm not using any terms correctly, but at the moment I'm not really focused on exactly what to call it.


#3Reflexus

Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:27 PM

"diffraction within the sub-layers of surfaces"? Chromatic aberration is a property of the observer's lens, not of the scene itself

 

Subtle caustics which look like chromatic aberration (because instead of being seen reflected off another surface, they directly hit the eye). And I know I'm not using any terms correctly, but at the moment I'm not really focused on exactly what to call it.


#2Reflexus

Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:26 PM

"diffraction within the sub-layers of surfaces"? Chromatic aberration is a property of the observer's lens, not of the scene itself

 

Subtle caustics which look like chromatic aberration. And I know I'm not using any terms correctly, but at the moment I'm not really focused on exactly what to call it.


#1Reflexus

Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:25 PM

"diffraction within the sub-layers of surfaces"? Chromatic aberration is a property of the observer's lens, not of the scene itself

 

Subtle caustics which look like chromatic aberration.


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