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#ActualFrenetic Pony

Posted 04 June 2013 - 01:22 AM

Well if you're going with physically based stuff a filmic tonemapper: http://mynameismjp.wordpress.com/2010/04/30/a-closer-look-at-tone-mapping/

 

They're all, supposedly if the name means anything, based off the tonemapping for actual film, which deals obviously with physically base "real world" stuff anyway. There was this huge spiel with data, a pdf, I read months ago explaining exactly why film exposes in that way and how it suits real world scenarios, including real world under/over exposure clipping and light ranges and etc. If anyone knows what I'm babbling about and has it bookmarked then that's the most helpful thing I can think of. Real world light intensity of everything from a moonless night to the middle of a bright day and etc.

 

One of the specific I can remember was a reason for the toes on either end spreading out in an S shape, and that was to avoid sharp clipping in either over or under exposure, as well as ensuring there's still some saturation in both relatively dark shadows and bright highlights.


#1Frenetic Pony

Posted 04 June 2013 - 01:05 AM

Well if you're going with physically based stuff a filmic tonemapper: http://mynameismjp.wordpress.com/2010/04/30/a-closer-look-at-tone-mapping/

 

They're all, supposedly if the name means anything, based off the tonemapping for actual film, which deals obviously with physically base "real world" stuff anyway. There was this huge spiel with data, a pdf, I read months ago explaining exactly why film exposes in that way and how it suits real world scenarios, including real world under/over exposure clipping and light ranges and etc. If anyone knows what I'm babbling about and has it bookmarked then that's the most helpful thing I can think of.

 

One of the specific I can remember was a reason for the toes on either end spreading out in an S shape, and that was to avoid sharp clipping in either over or under exposure, as well as ensuring there's still some saturation in both relatively dark shadows and bright highlights. I know Crytek went more towards physically based shading with Crysis 3, and they seemed happy with their filmic tonemapping.


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