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#ActualStormynature

Posted 04 June 2013 - 12:09 PM

What they are not hard-wired for is being lectured to.

 

I am going to disagree somewhat with this statement as the immediate image that springs to mind is that of the hellfire and brimstone preacher who basically spends his time on the pulpit lecturing to his flock about the evils of sin. Lectures that are presented well (without using a story) can engage the audience quite effectively. If you are referring more along the lines of a parent lecturing to a child and it going in one ear and out the other (or something similar)...this to me is more about the failing of the parent to adequately relate the material in such a way as to communicate effectively. With respect to literature, the bible whilst it contains stories, it is very much concerned about the imparting of "appropriate" morality and behaviours by which to govern ourselves. However if you take the ultimate lecture in the bible i.e. the ten commandments it is situated in the midst of a tale that effectively presents this lecture in a palatable form it can be argued. Delivery and relatability are key to an audience's attention 

 

 

 

 

Long before I wanted to be a game designer, I wanted to be a writer

 

You will find whilst there can be some overlapping skills...there is a great deal of difference in these two roles.

 

From the perspective of your writing it is difficult without seeing examples of it to truly make any appropriately relevant comments with regards to your style, delivery etc. All I can do is provide some generic advice.

 

 

And, in fact, was a writer. I wrote a number of short stories, and got mostly positive feedback for them.

 

Were any of these stories published? As a writer if your stories are only seen by your initial surrounds i.e. school, family and friends you may not be receiving appropriate advice that will strengthen your writing rather what you effectively receive is feedback from a limited population pool that most likely falls into the same socio-economic and geographical pool and thus will have similar responses for the most part which may or may not be valid for a much larger audience....for example the work's of Jules Verne may not be to many people's tastes but in the larger population pool he is considered a great writer by many. If you haven't been, you should be dispatching your short stories off to the various magazines, competitions, editors in order to start garnering feedback as well establishing a portfolio for yourself (just take into account that rejection does not automatically imply a poorly crafted story). Do you belong to any writing organisations in your area/region/country/internet that affords you access to others who write, who have the advantage of also providing feedback as well creating the beginnings of a network of contacts that will serve you in a future career associated with writing.

 

If you are writing for games a good example of a typical situation you might face is that shown by Project Divine Thread, in this case you have no control over the initial ideas, the gameplay, the environment rather you are given the task of weaving all of these elements together to provide a plotline that works within the boundaries they have already established. Elements such as where the protagonist finds that they are a child of one of the gods is probably negotiable but learning to work with other people's ideas and having the skill to push for modifications to some of their thoughts is a tricksome process, at times requiring you to have the courage to speak up but also the wisdom to step back when our suggestion gets shot down in flames.

 

I really can't comment about your zephyr-like versus chainsaw to the head delivery of morality/commentary issues in your writing as I would need to read some of your work in order to make a judgement for myself as to how I perceive your delivery.

 

Tom was very right in pointing out that recognising your weaknesses in writing is a very good thing...my only caution to this is make sure what you have identified as weaknesses are in actual fact so. Hence the need to ensure feedback you receive is from a variety of sources. With specific reference to your humour in writing, you can not make everyone laugh...it just doesn't happen. There will always be some people who find humour in some things that other will define as sick...don't take it to heart and don't consider reader who can't accept your humour as being soft...just simply recognise that the type of story you are writing is the type of story they would never buy anyway i.e. not your target audience..:learning to write humour outside of your normal comfort zone is simply another skill and can be developed if you wish to.

 

 

From a game designer's perspective. This is where you go through the game design forum as it doesn't directly relate to the writing forum except in the smallest part.


#1Stormynature

Posted 04 June 2013 - 12:03 PM

What they are not hard-wired for is being lectured to.

 

I am going to disagree somewhat with this statement as the immediate image that springs to mind is that of the hellfire and brimstone preacher who basically spends his time on the pulpit lecturing to his flock about the evils of sin. Lectures that are presented well (without using a story) can engage the audience quite effectively. If you are referring more along the lines of a parent lecturing to a child and it going in one ear and out the other (or something similar)...this to me is more about the failing of the parent to adequately relate the material in such a way as to communicate effectively. With respect to literature, the bible whilst it contains stories, it is very much concerned about the imparting of "appropriate" morality and behaviours by which to govern ourselves. However if you take the ultimate lecture in the bible i.e. the ten commandments it is situated in the midst of a tale that effectively presents this lecture in a palatable form it can be argued. Delivery and relatability are key to an audience's attention 

 

 

 

Long before I wanted to be a game designer, I wanted to be a writer

 

You will find whilst there can be some overlapping skills...there is a great deal of difference in these two roles.

 

From the perspective of your writing it is difficult without seeing examples of it to truly make any appropriately relevant comments with regards to your style, delivery etc. All I can do is provide some generic advice.

 

And, in fact, was a writer. I wrote a number of short stories, and got mostly positive feedback for them.

 

Were any of these stories published? As a writer if your stories are only seen by your initial surrounds i.e. school, family and friends you may not be receiving appropriate advice that will strengthen your writing rather what you effectively receive is feedback from a limited population pool that most likely falls into the same socio-economic and geographical pool and thus will have similar responses for the most part which may or may not be valid for a much larger audience....for example the work's of Jules Verne may not be to many people's tastes but in the larger population pool he is considered a great writer by many. If you haven't been, you should be dispatching your short stories off to the various magazines, competitions, editors in order to start garnering feedback as well establishing a portfolio for yourself (just take into account that rejection does not automatically imply a poorly crafted story). Do you belong to any writing organisations in your area/region/country/internet that affords you access to others who write, who have the advantage of also providing feedback as well creating the beginnings of a network of contacts that will serve you in a future career associated with writing.

 

If you are writing for games a good example of a typical situation you might face is that shown by Project Divine Thread, in this case you have no control over the initial ideas, the gameplay, the environment rather you are given the task of weaving all of these elements together to provide a plotline that works within the boundaries they have already established. Elements such as were the protagonist may find that they are a child of one of the gods is probably negotiable but learning to work with other people's ideas and having the skill to push for modifications to some of their thoughts is a tricksome process, at times requiring you to have the courage to speak up but also the wisdom to step back when our suggestion gets shot down in flames.

 

I really can't comment about your zephyr-like versus chainsaw to the head delivery of morality/commentary issues in your writing as I would need to read some of your work in order to make a judgement for myself as to how I perceive your delivery.

 

Tom was very right in pointing out that recognising your weaknesses in writing is a very good thing...my only caution to this is make sure what you have identified as weaknesses are in actual fact so. Hence the need to ensure feedback you receive is from a variety of sources. With specific reference to your humour in writing, you can not make everyone laugh...it just doesn't happen. There will always be some people who find humour in some things that other will define as sick...don't take it to heart and don't consider reader who can't accept your humour as being soft...just simply recognise that the type of story you are writing is the type of story they would never buy anyway i.e. not your target audience..:learning to write humour outside of your normal comfort zone is simply another skill and can be developed if you wish to.

 

 

From a game designer's perspective. This is where you go through the game design forum as it doesn't directly relate to the writing forum except in the smallest part.


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