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#ActualBornToCode

Posted 06 June 2013 - 02:07 PM

You use the Index buffer that way not only you save memory on reusing vertices. You can also used index buffers as a way to split the mesh by material id, that way If you have a mesh that uses multiple material, you can break each section into his own index buffer while referencing the same vertex buffer. For example let's say you wanted to draw an Quad, you would basically need 6 vertices. But with an index buffer you only need 4 vertices and the index buffer would reference which  one of those vertices it needs to use to create the quad.

 

Wut? Whether the index data is stored in a vertex buffer, or whether it's stored in an array in system memory, they'll both consume exactly the same amount of memory.

 

 

>>>My question is what are (if any) the performance differences in storing index data in an array and using it to call glDrawElements:

The Buffer version *should* be quicker (unless you are using an integrated graphics card that makes use of system memory instead of its own dedicated GDDR5 ram. In general, prefer vertex buffer objects, to the older vertex array approach.

 

I think you are confuse, the OP is not asking if he is storing the index into the vertex buffer. He is talking about splitting his mesh into Submeshes.


#2BornToCode

Posted 06 June 2013 - 02:05 PM

You use the Index buffer that way not only you save memory on reusing vertices. You can also used index buffers as a way to split the mesh by material id, that way If you have a mesh that uses multiple material, you can break each section into his own index buffer while referencing the same vertex buffer. For example let's say you wanted to draw an Quad, you would basically need 6 vertices. But with an index buffer you only need 4 vertices and the index buffer would reference which  one of those vertices it needs to use to create the quad.

 

Wut? Whether the index data is stored in a vertex buffer, or whether it's stored in an array in system memory, they'll both consume exactly the same amount of memory.

 

 

>>My question is what are (if any) the performance differences in storing index data in an array and using it to call glDrawElements:

The Buffer version *should* be quicker (unless you are using an integrated graphics card that makes use of system memory instead of its own dedicated GDDR5 ram. In general, prefer vertex buffer objects, to the older vertex array approach.

 

I think you are very confuse, it seems like you do not understand what i am trying to say. If your vertex stride is for example 32bytes to represent an single vertex. Then having an index buffer will consume way less memory since you can just use the index buffer to represent duplicate vertices instead of just creating new ones on the vertex buffer.


#1BornToCode

Posted 06 June 2013 - 02:02 PM

You use the Index buffer that way not only you save memory on reusing vertices. You can also used index buffers as a way to split the mesh by material id, that way If you have a mesh that uses multiple material, you can break each section into his own index buffer while referencing the same vertex buffer. For example let's say you wanted to draw an Quad, you would basically need 6 vertices. But with an index buffer you only need 4 vertices and the index buffer would reference which  one of those vertices it needs to use to create the quad.

 

Wut? Whether the index data is stored in a vertex buffer, or whether it's stored in an array in system memory, they'll both consume exactly the same amount of memory.

 

 

>My question is what are (if any) the performance differences in storing index data in an array and using it to call glDrawElements:

The Buffer version *should* be quicker (unless you are using an integrated graphics card that makes use of system memory instead of its own dedicated GDDR5 ram. In general, prefer vertex buffer objects, to the older vertex array approach.

 

I think you are very confuse, it seems like you do not understand what i am trying to say. If your vertex stride is for example 32bytes to represent an single vertex. Then having an index buffer will consume way less memory since you can just use the index to represent duplicate vertices instead of just creating new ones on the vertex buffer.


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