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#ActualTom Sloper

Posted 10 June 2013 - 10:35 AM

can anyone recomend me good game development studios that will work on full game, provided screenplay and storyboard.

 

How to do it (how I do it):

1. Analyze the marketplace and identify existing games that are similar in genre, platform, and scope to your project.

2. Collect information on the developers of those games. Determine which ones are not owned by a publisher or platform holder and are likely to be unconstrained from working with you. Obtain contact information (especially telephone).

3. Prepare a RFP, what I call a bid package. I described what goes into that in my chapter on Production in the book Introduction To Game Development.

4. Start telephoning.  Tell'em why you're calling (without going into detail about your game) and ask if they're available and interested. Several of the parties are likely to express unwillingness for a variety of reasons. Be polite and cross them off and keep calling others.

5. When someone expresses willingness to hear more, send him an NDA. When the NDA is signed, send the RFP.

6. When someone asks who else is bidding, I usually prefer not to divulge that information.

7. When you get the proposals back, look at not only the price but the other details as well. Are there hidden costs, is their schedule realistic, are their people right... sometimes a developer will propose using their A team, then when you get underway you have their B team.

 

So it's not a simple matter of "hey guys, give me some names."  You have to do the same thing I would do -- your homework.


#1Tom Sloper

Posted 10 June 2013 - 10:32 AM

How to do it (how I do it):

1. Analyze the marketplace and identify existing games that are similar in genre, platform, and scope to your project.

2. Collect information on the developers of those games. Determine which ones are not owned by a publisher or platform holder and are likely to be unconstrained from working with you. Obtain contact information (especially telephone).

3. Prepare a RFP, what I call a bid package. I described what goes into that in my chapter on Production in the book Introduction To Game Development.

4. Start telephoning.  Tell'em why you're calling (without going into detail about your game) and ask if they're available and interested. Several of the parties are likely to express unwillingness for a variety of reasons. Be polite and cross them off and keep calling others.

5. When someone expresses willingness to hear more, send him an NDA. When the NDA is signed, send the RFP.

6. When someone asks who else is bidding, I usually prefer not to divulge that information.

7. When you get the proposals back, look at not only the price but the other details as well. Are there hidden costs, is their schedule realistic, are their people right... sometimes a developer will propose using their A team, then when you get underway you have their B team.

 

So it's not a simple matter of "hey guys, give me some names."  You have to do the same thing I would do -- your homework.


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