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#ActualSerapth

Posted 14 June 2013 - 01:41 PM

thanks, i dont really have an access to see the books because in my city there isnt really a "computer" section, and i am pretty sure there isnt any books on c++ on my city,

so if you could please tell me what book should be good that teaches the latest c++ version and techniques that would be great and im pretty much not just for me but for

everyone who is looking for one so as I.

 

i will order from Amazon if that's possible and i would like to order the second book you suggested too so i will look for a book too if you guys cant find one and i will update you guys here smile.png

 

thanks for your help and i hope you will keep helping me and other's smile.png

 

 

I need to warn you, until you know C++, Effective C++ will be absolutely useless to you!  It's about making you a better C++ programmer, not teaching you C++ in general.  The book assumes a lot of prior knowledge.  You could get something out of it, but without experience, it wont be much.

 

If you can read books online, you may want to consider Safari Books Online.   That is what I personally use, its an online subscription to about 14000 books.  Its pricey or cheap depending on your perspective, its about the same as 2/3 a new book per month, so if you buy a book a month, it's a bargain, if you dont, its not.  OF course, if you cant read on a screen, it wont be much use to use, but I read on my tablets or on screen without issue.

 

I just did a quick look on Safari, ordered by date.

 

The author of C++ without Fear ( a great beginners text ) has released C++ for the Impatient, which looks like a very good option, if you have some prior programming experience.  ( It assumes you know some programming basics, but no prior C or C++ knowledge ).  The author does a great job of making difficult things easy to understand.  The book is obviously written for C++ 11 which is nice.

 

C++ for Programmers, 2nd Edition has been updated to C++11.  I just now skimmed the changes and its somewhat obvious C++ was bolted on ( pointers are in chapter 8, while smart pointers are in chapter 11 for example ), they have updated the text with callouts saying when C++11 has rendered something bad practice.  Seems like an OK book, but might be a bit confusing to learn from.

 

C++ How to program 9th Edition has been updated for C++11, but it appears to be a bolt on.  Again, pointers are mentioned, this time without even talking about alternatives... C++ pointers have to wait until chapter 17 and 23, so basically the back.  auto isn't mentioned until half way through the book, lamdas until 3/4 the way.  Basically it looks like this revision just had the C++11 stuff bolted on.

 

C++ Primer Plus, 5th Edition doesn't even talk about memory management until chapter 12... at all!  This sounds bad but isn't, this is a very very very good approach to teaching C++.  Then it introduces memory management using C++ style memory management, and has the warning "Until you have read Chapter 13, your classes should allocate dynamic memory only if they use smart pointers to manage that memory."  Impressed.  It looks like C++ Primer Plus is the only one of the three prior books that didn't just bolt the C++11 stuff on top.

 

So, from my initial scans, I would recommend C++ Primer Plus 5th Edition or C++ for the Impatient, if you have prior programming experience.

 

That said, I only have access to the Safari books, which doesn't include Bjarne's book, the C++ Programming Language, which may or may not have been updated.  That is a really really really dry book though, so even if it has been updated, it can be a bit difficult to read.


#1Serapth

Posted 14 June 2013 - 01:36 PM

thanks, i dont really have an access to see the books because in my city there isnt really a "computer" section, and i am pretty sure there isnt any books on c++ on my city,

so if you could please tell me what book should be good that teaches the latest c++ version and techniques that would be great and im pretty much not just for me but for

everyone who is looking for one so as I.

 

i will order from Amazon if that's possible and i would like to order the second book you suggested too so i will look for a book too if you guys cant find one and i will update you guys here smile.png

 

thanks for your help and i hope you will keep helping me and other's smile.png

 

 

I need to warn you, until you know C++, Effective C++ will be absolutely useless to you!  It's about making you a better C++ programmer, not teaching you C++ in general.  The book assumes a lot of prior knowledge.  You could get something out of it, but without experience, it wont be much.

 

If you can read books online, you may want to consider Safari Books Online.   That is what I personally use, its an online subscription to about 14000 books.  Its pricey or cheap depending on your perspective, its about the same as 2/3 a new book per month, so if you buy a book a month, it's a bargain, if you dont, its not.  OF course, if you cant read on a screen, it wont be much use to use, but I read on my tablets or on screen without issue.

 

I just did a quick look on Safari, ordered by date.

 

The author of C++ without Fear ( a great beginners text ) has released C++ for the Impatient, which looks like a very good option, if you have some prior programming experience.  ( It assumes you know some programming basics, but no prior C or C++ knowledge ).  The author does a great job of making difficult things easy to understand.  The book is obviously written for C++ 11 which is nice.

 

C++ for Programmers, 2nd Edition has been updated to C++11.  I just now skimmed the changes and its somewhat obvious C++ was bolted on ( pointers are in chapter 8, while smart pointers are in chapter 11 for example ), they have updated the text with callouts saying when C++11 has rendered something bad practice.  Seems like an OK book, but might be a bit confusing to learn from.

 

C++ How to program 9th Edition has been updated for C++11, but it appears to be a bolt on.  Again, pointers are mentioned, this time without even talking about alternatives... C++ pointers have to wait until chapter 17 and 23, so basically the back.  auto isn't mentioned until half way through the book, lamdas until 3/4 the way.  Basically it looks like this revision just had the C++11 stuff bolted on.

 

C++ Primer Plus, 5th Edition doesn't even talk about memory management until chapter 12... at all!  This sounds bad but isn't, this is a very very very good approach to teaching C++.  Then it introduces memory management using C++ style memory management, and has the warning "Until you have read Chapter 13, your classes should allocate dynamic memory only if they use smart pointers to manage that memory."  Impressed.  It looks like C++ Primer Plus is the only one of the three prior books that didn't just bolt the C++11 stuff on top.

 

So, from my initial scans, I would recommend C++ Primer Plus 5th Edition or C++ for the Impatient, if you have prior programming experience.

 

That said, I only have access to the Safari books, which doesn't include Bjarne's book, the C++ Programming Language, which may or may not have been updated.  That is a really really really dry book though, so even if it has been updated, it can be a bit difficult to read.


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