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#ActualJeremy Williams

Posted 23 June 2013 - 11:57 AM

The site really isn't working lately, is it? I'm not even getting on-site notifications anymore. I had no idea that there was a reply to this thread.

I would LOVE to see this game actually be produced, but a question I have for you is simply this: Do you have the tools, the systems, programs, the team, everything to build a game. There is a LOT in your idea and with a large amount of data, can you fit in without a fuss?

No. I'm a college student, this concept is up for its own sake, not to gather a team or to start production. And I'm pretty sure I can fit this into a single game, yes. If not, the chopping block exists for a reason.

I'm no game developer (at the moment at least) but I do love the little things in a game, I see no reason to argue or decline such thoughts. I know if I see this description for a game, it WILL be challenging (Something that Skyrim never understood) it may be harder then the Demon Souls series.

It will be hard, yes. Especially at first, when the player still can't work without the game holding their hand. But it's actually not as hard as it sounds, once you get past that. The majority of the things that would give the apparant degree of crushing difficulty are actively discouraged. For instance, attacking an NPC is only encouraged a few times in the game, the first being that raider turning his back on you. When you gain entrance to the raider compound later, and you have to one way or another, you find out he had two kids and a pregnant wife. He has plenty of friends and everyone is upset over his cold-blooded murder. Have fun trying to rationalize that away. That kind of guilt trip, combined with the difficulty of killing NPCs in the first place, should be enough to discourage the player in the future.

The recent game: "The Last Of Us" did an amazing job with survival and thinking what to use at the time (granted choosing the proper difficulty) which is a question I do have for you: Is there a difficulty level selection in your game? (If there is one, sorry if I missed it.)

No, there won't be. I can't justify a difficulty level with the rest of the game's themes. Putting it on easy mode would invalidate the primary lesson of the game, as would adding any amount of the typical videogame mollycoddling before the player learns how to function without it. (Even then, it really just serves to show they don't need it.)

You may have a large competition with a survival games but I think you may win if you can manage all of this.
Food, water, rest, the med-kits, bullet rarities. It's all brilliant and makes sense for a survival game.
I do have a concern: there is a LOT of different remedies for different occasions. Is this just to up the difficulty, to boost up your survival preparations? Is it easy or hard to find the proper medical supplies needed?

While there may be a lot of them, each serves a very specific, straightforward purpose. The idea of having a different remedy for each different purpose is partially for realism, and partially to encourage scavenging and crafting. Let's face it, if there was one medical kit that did everything, the player would just stack up as many as they found and once they got to a certain point they wouldn't have to keep looking. This changes that, a lot.

If you do want another need to make your game even more realistic and challenging, you should add Sanity.
With everything going on, all these harsh times and shit happening in your life, you may start to go insane. If you don't have a clear, calm head, you're going to die quickly.
Let your sanity raise up by the following effects:
Exploring - Let's face it, we love our home but at times we just need to get out. Staying in one place for too long can really get your thoughts racing.

Being too far away from home location - We do miss our homes (Base camp or whatever people would call "home" of this situation\time.) and we start to feel un-easy about it. I'm not so much into this one because I'm sure your character and others would move around a lot. So this was just a clunker idea.

Stay in the light - We never like the dark, it can mess with our imagination. Without sight, we don't know what's real and the simple of noises can startle us. Yes I do understand you need to stay in the shadows, away from soldiers and raiders, but if you're there for days, months straight... you might lose it.

Enjoy the littlest things in life - Even adults need a good time here and there. With all this seriousness happening, you gotta make a little room for some fun. Yes, the world you know is infected with zombies and shit; but it's still a life. If people just think "survival" is all to life, than they would have just shot their brains out already. I know I would. So let your character have interesting conversations with NPCs he\she knows, play some tic-tac-toe, playing cards, have a smoke, whatever! The guy\girl still needs something to do in life other than kill people and survive.

Again, I'm no game developer but I do help any of this helps. =)
~Good luck! From: Leaferson~

There's already a "morale" meter that fills this exact purpose. It's assumed the player isn't a homebody (would you be there if you were?) and they have no choice but to be young (young adult is as old as it goes) so staying cooped up in one place, especially using the wait or rest feature a lot, drives them fucking batty.

That said, they don't have a home, they don't want one and being away from home wouldn't bother them if they had one. The PC is vocal, (you can change how vocal) and will often express disapproval of their situation. Staying in one place, especially a confined space, and being bored are the things they are most vocal about. "WHY am I still here?" "The walls are closing in..." "Well, while you go whack off, or get a sandwich, or whatever, I'll just... *sigh*" "PLAYER! WHERE THE HELL DID YOU GO?" The more bored they get, the more vocal they get. Eventually, they will get to the point where they start humming, whistling, singing, reciting poems, ranting about their issues and even holding entire conversations with themselves.

And there's no stat, no perk, no feat and no trait that prevents boredom's effect on morale or even significantly reduces it. Everything else you can harden your character against, but boredom will always remain. As Nietzsche said, "Against boredom, even gods struggle in vain."

#2Jeremy Williams

Posted 22 June 2013 - 04:13 PM

The site really isn't working lately, is it? I'm not even getting on-site notifications anymore. I had no idea that there was a reply to this thread.

I would LOVE to see this game actually be produced, but a question I have for you is simply this: Do you have the tools, the systems, programs, the team, everything to build a game. There is a LOT in your idea and with a large amount of data, can you fit in without a fuss?

No. I'm a college student, this concept is up for its own sake, not to gather a team or to start production. And I'm pretty sure I can fit this into a single game, yes. If not, the chopping block exists for a reason.

 

 

I'm no game developer (at the moment at least) but I do love the little things in a game, I see no reason to argue or decline such thoughts. I know if I see this description for a game, it WILL be challenging (Something that Skyrim never understood) it may be harder then the Demon Souls series.

It will be hard, yes. Especially at first, when the player still can't work without the game holding their hand. But it's actually not as hard as it sounds, once you get past that. The majority of the things that would give the apparant degree of crushing difficulty are actively discouraged. For instance, attacking an NPC is only encouraged a few times in the game, the first being that raider turning his back on you. When you gain entrance to the raider compound later, and you have to one way or another, you find out he had two kids and a pregnant wife. He has plenty of friends, the newbies looked up to him, and everyone is upset over his cold-blooded murder. Have fun trying to rationalize that away. That kind of guilt trip, combined with the difficulty of killing NPCs in the first place, should be enough to discourage the player in the future.

 

 

The recent game: "The Last Of Us" did an amazing job with survival and thinking what to use at the time (granted choosing the proper difficulty) which is a question I do have for you: Is there a difficulty level selection in your game? (If there is one, sorry if I missed it.)

No, there won't be. I can't justify a difficulty level with the rest of the game's themes. Putting it on easy mode would invalidate the primary lesson of the game, as would adding any amount of the typical videogame mollycoddling before the player learns how to function without it. (Even then, it really just serves to show they don't need it.)

 

 

You may have a large competition with a survival games but I think you may win if you can manage all of this.
Food, water, rest, the med-kits, bullet rarities. It's all brilliant and makes sense for a survival game.
I do have a concern: there is a LOT of different remedies for different occasions. Is this just to up the difficulty, to boost up your survival preparations? Is it easy or hard to find the proper medical supplies needed?

While there may be a lot of them, each serves a very specific, straightforward purpose. The idea of having a different remedy for each different purpose is partially for realism, and partially to encourage scavenging and crafting. Let's face it, if there was one medical kit that did everything, the player would just stack up as many as they found and once they got to a certain point they wouldn't have to keep looking. This changes that, a lot.

 

If you do want another need to make your game even more realistic and challenging, you should add Sanity.

With everything going on, all these harsh times and shit happening in your life, you may start to go insane. If you don't have a clear, calm head, you're going to die quickly.

Let your sanity raise up by the following effects:

Exploring - Let's face it, we love our home but at times we just need to get out. Staying in one place for too long can really get your thoughts racing.

 

Being too far away from home location - We do miss our homes (Base camp or whatever people would call "home" of this situation\time.) and we start to feel un-easy about it. I'm not so much into this one because I'm sure your character and others would move around a lot. So this was just a clunker idea.

 

Stay in the light - We never like the dark, it can mess with our imagination. Without sight, we don't know what's real and the simple of noises can startle us. Yes I do understand you need to stay in the shadows, away from soldiers and raiders, but if you're there for days, months straight... you might lose it.

 

Enjoy the littlest things in life - Even adults need a good time here and there. With all this seriousness happening, you gotta make a little room for some fun. Yes, the world you know is infected with zombies and shit; but it's still a life. If people just think "survival" is all to life, than they would have just shot their brains out already. I know I would. So let your character have interesting conversations with NPCs he\she knows, play some tic-tac-toe, playing cards, have a smoke, whatever! The guy\girl still needs something to do in life other than kill people and survive.

Again, I'm no game developer but I do help any of this helps. =)
~Good luck! From: Leaferson~

There's already a "morale" meter that fills this exact purpose. It's assumed the player isn't a homebody (would you be there if you were?) and they have no choice but to be young (young adult is as old as it goes) so staying cooped up in one place, especially using the wait or rest feature a lot, drives them fucking batty.

 

That said, they don't have a home, they don't want one and being away from home wouldn't bother them if they had one. The PC is vocal, (you can change how vocal) and will often express disapproval of their situation. Staying in one place, especially a confined space, and being bored are the things they are most vocal about. "WHY am I still here?" "The walls are closing in..." "Well, while you go whack off, or get a sandwich, or whatever, I'll just... *sigh*" "PLAYER! WHERE THE HELL DID YOU GO?" The more bored they get, the more vocal they get. Eventually, they will get to the point where they start humming, whistling, singing, reciting poems, ranting about their issues and even holding entire conversations with themselves.

 

And there's no stat, no perk, no feat and no trait that prevents boredom's effect on morale or even significantly reduces it. Everything else you can harden your character against, but boredom will always remain. As Nietzsche said, "Against boredom, even gods struggle in vain."


#1Jeremy Williams

Posted 19 June 2013 - 10:47 AM

The site really isn't working lately, is it? I'm not even getting on-site notifications anymore. I had no idea that there was a reply to this thread.

I would LOVE to see this game actually be produced, but a question I have for you is simply this: Do you have the tools, the systems, programs, the team, everything to build a game. There is a LOT in your idea and with a large amount of data, can you fit in without a fuss?

No. I'm a college student, this concept is up for its own sake, not to gather a team or to start production. And I'm pretty sure I can fit this into a single game, yes. If not, the chopping block exists for a reason.

 

 

I'm no game developer (at the moment at least) but I do love the little things in a game, I see no reason to argue or decline such thoughts. I know if I see this description for a game, it WILL be challenging (Something that Skyrim never understood) it may be harder then the Demon Souls series.

It will be hard, yes. Especially at first, when the player still can't work without the game holding their hand. But it's actually not as hard as it sounds, once you get past that. The majority of the things that would give the apparant degree of crushing difficulty are actively discouraged. For instance, attacking an NPC is only encouraged a few times in the game, the first being that raider turning his back on you. When you gain entrance to the raider compound later, and you have to one way or another, you find out he had two kids and a pregnant wife. He has plenty of friends, the newbies looked up to him, and everyone is upset over his senseless death. Have fun trying to rationalize that away.

 

 

The recent game: "The Last Of Us" did an amazing job with survival and thinking what to use at the time (granted choosing the proper difficulty) which is a question I do have for you: Is there a difficulty level selection in your game? (If there is one, sorry if I missed it.)

No, there won't be. I can't justify a difficulty level with the rest of the game's themes. Putting it on easy mode would invalidate the primary lesson of the game, as would adding any amount of the typical videogame mollycoddling before the player learns how to function without it. (Even then, it really just serves to show they don't need it.)

 

 

You may have a large competition with a survival games but I think you may win if you can manage all of this.
Food, water, rest, the med-kits, bullet rarities. It's all brilliant and makes sense for a survival game.
I do have a concern: there is a LOT of different remedies for different occasions. Is this just to up the difficulty, to boost up your survival preparations? Is it easy or hard to find the proper medical supplies needed?

While there may be a lot of them, each serves a very specific, straightforward purpose. The idea of having a different remedy for each different purpose is partially for realism, and partially to encourage scavenging and crafting. Let's face it, if there was one medical kit that did everything, the player would just stack up as many as they found and once they got to a certain point they wouldn't have to keep looking. This changes that, a lot.

 

If you do want another need to make your game even more realistic and challenging, you should add Sanity.

With everything going on, all these harsh times and shit happening in your life, you may start to go insane. If you don't have a clear, calm head, you're going to die quickly.

Let your sanity raise up by the following effects:

Exploring - Let's face it, we love our home but at times we just need to get out. Staying in one place for too long can really get your thoughts racing.

 

Being too far away from home location - We do miss our homes (Base camp or whatever people would call "home" of this situation\time.) and we start to feel un-easy about it. I'm not so much into this one because I'm sure your character and others would move around a lot. So this was just a clunker idea.

 

Stay in the light - We never like the dark, it can mess with our imagination. Without sight, we don't know what's real and the simple of noises can startle us. Yes I do understand you need to stay in the shadows, away from soldiers and raiders, but if you're there for days, months straight... you might lose it.

 

Enjoy the littlest things in life - Even adults need a good time here and there. With all this seriousness happening, you gotta make a little room for some fun. Yes, the world you know is infected with zombies and shit; but it's still a life. If people just think "survival" is all to life, than they would have just shot their brains out already. I know I would. So let your character have interesting conversations with NPCs he\she knows, play some tic-tac-toe, playing cards, have a smoke, whatever! The guy\girl still needs something to do in life other than kill people and survive.

Again, I'm no game developer but I do help any of this helps. =)
~Good luck! From: Leaferson~

There's already a "morale" meter that fills this exact purpose. It's assumed the player isn't a homebody (would you be there if you were?) and they have no choice but to be young (young adult is as old as it goes) so staying cooped up in one place, especially using the wait or rest feature a lot, drives them fucking batty.

 

That said, they don't have a home, they don't want one and being away from home wouldn't bother them if they had one. The PC is vocal, (you can change how vocal) and will often express disapproval of their situation. Staying in one place, especially a confined space, and being bored are the things they are most vocal about. "WHY am I still here?" "The walls are closing in..." "Well, while you go whack off, or get a sandwich, or whatever, I'll just... *sigh*" "PLAYER! WHERE THE HELL DID YOU GO?" The more bored they get, the more vocal they get. Eventually, they will get to the point where they start humming, whistling, singing, reciting poems, ranting about their issues and even holding entire conversations with themselves.

 

And there's no stat, no perk, no feat and no trait that prevents boredom's effect on morale or even significantly reduces it. Everything else you can harden your character against, but boredom will always remain. As Nietzsche said, "Against boredom, even gods struggle in vain."


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