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FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


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#ActualHaps

Posted 21 June 2013 - 02:40 PM

I don't feel virtual sticks are 'best', but it can be a compromise. Some types of games just respond better with a couple of axes and buttons than to any kind of tap, tilt, or swipe, platformers in particular.

 

It's also difficult to be 'first.' Even if your controls were intuitively designed, sticks and pads are our default inputs. If the game looks similar to anything they've played before, you're fighting against that acclimatization. With Windows 8, the majority of complaints are along the lines of "this is drastically different" and that's made it difficult for people to adapt.

 

If people are holding the device incorrectly, you could try drawing more attention to the controls when they first start up, get them to change the way they think about the game. Focus the first minute on the optimal way to play and throw in some messages suggesting on how to hold it. If there's a lot of different gestures or actions, don't overwhelm them all at once, get them to use them one at a time.

 

It sounds like if you can break them out of the virtual-stick mentality before they get the expectation that it's the way to play, they might have a better experience.


#3Haps

Posted 21 June 2013 - 11:00 AM

I don't feel virtual sticks are 'best', but it can be a compromise. Some types of games just respond better with a couple of axes and buttons than to any kind of tap, tilt, or swipe, platformers in particular.

 

It's also difficult to be 'first.' Even if your controls were intuitively designed, sticks and pads are our default inputs. If the game looks similar to anything they've played before, you're fighting against that acclimatization. With Windows 8, the majority of complaints are along the lines of "this is drastically different" and that's made it difficult for people to adapt.

 

If people are holding the device incorrectly, you could try drawing more attention to the controls when they first start up, get them to change the way they think about the game. Focus the first minute on the optimal way to play and throw in some messages suggesting on how to hold it. If there's a lot of different gestures or actions, don't overwhelm them all at once, get them to use them one at a time.

 

It sounds like if you can break them out of the virtual-stick mentality before they can set the expectation that it's the way to play, they might have a better experience.


#2Haps

Posted 21 June 2013 - 10:59 AM

I don't feel virtual sticks are 'best', but it can be a compromise. Some types of games just respond better with a couple of axes and buttons than to any kind of tap, tilt, or swipe, platformers in particular.

 

It's also difficult to be 'first.' Even if your controls were intuitively designed, sticks and pads are our default inputs. If the game looks similar to anything they've played before, you're fighting against that acclimatization. With Windows 8, the majority of complaints are along the lines of "this is drastically different" and that's made it difficult for people to adapt.

 

If people are holding the device incorrectly, you could try drawing more attention to the controls when they first start up, get them to change the way they think about the game. Focus the first minute of play on the optimal way to play and throw in some messages suggesting on how to hold it. If there's a lot of different gestures or actions, don't overwhelm them all at once. Get them to use them one at a time.

 

It sounds like if you can break them out of the virtual-stick mentality before they can set the expectation that it's the way to play, they might have a better experience.


#1Haps

Posted 21 June 2013 - 10:57 AM

I don't feel virtual sticks are 'best', but it can be a compromise. Some types of games just respond better with a couple of axes and buttons than to any kind of tap, tilt, or swipe, platformers in particular.

 

It's also difficult to be 'first.' Even if your controls were intuitively designed, sticks and pads are our default inputs. If the game looks similar to anything they've played before, you're fighting against that acclimatization. With Windows 8, the majority of complaints are along the lines of "this is drastically different" and that's made it difficult for people to adapt.

 

If people are holding the device incorrectly, you could try drawing more attention to the controls when they first start up, get them to change the way they think about the game. Focus the first minute of play on the optimal way to play and throw in some messages suggesting on how to hold it. It sounds like if you can break them out of the virtual-stick mentality before they can set the expectation that it's the way to play, they might have a better experience.


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