Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Banner advertising on our site currently available from just $5!


1. Learn about the promo. 2. Sign up for GDNet+. 3. Set up your advert!


#Actualphil_t

Posted 28 June 2013 - 03:51 PM

That's actually expected, due to the way it's triangulated - there's probably nothing wrong with your calculations. If you generate your triangles in the opposite orientation, you'll get artifacts facing the other direction. These artifacts will be less noticeable the smaller you make your triangles, or the more textured you make your terrain.

 

You can also reduce it quite a bit if you just orient each triangle depending on the direction the slope faces (I suspect you'll notice that on slopes that are rotated 90 degrees from the one you pictured above, the artifact is not so noticeable). If the edges that splits each quad into two triangles is aligned so that it goes between the two vertices with the least height difference between them, then things will look better.

 

I explain this a bit here, under "Additional optimizations":

http://mtnphil.wordpress.com/2011/09/22/terrain-engine/

 

You could probably also get something that looks better if you instead sampled the terrain normals in the pixel shader instead of the vertex shader, since then you'd get values interpolated between 4 normals instead of 3.


#2phil_t

Posted 28 June 2013 - 03:47 PM

That's actually expected, due to the way it's triangulated - there's probably nothing wrong with your calculations. If you generate your triangles in the opposite orientation, you'll get artifacts facing the other direction. These artifacts will be less noticeable the smaller you make your triangles, or the more textured you make your terrain.

 

You can also reduce it quite a bit if you just orient each triangle depending on the direction the slope faces (I suspect you'll notice that on slopes that are rotated 90 degrees from the one you pictured above, the artifact is not so noticeable). If the edges that splits each quad into two triangles is aligned so that it goes between the two vertices with the least height difference between them, then things will look better.

 

I explain this a bit here, under "Additional optimizations":

http://mtnphil.wordpress.com/2011/09/22/terrain-engine/


#1phil_t

Posted 28 June 2013 - 03:47 PM

That's actually expected, due to the way it's triangulated. If you generate your triangles in the opposite orientation, you'll get artifacts facing the other direction. These artifacts will be less noticeable the smaller you make your triangles, or the more textured you make your terrain.

 

You can also reduce it quite a bit if you just orient each triangle depending on the direction the slope faces (I suspect you'll notice that on slopes that are rotated 90 degrees from the one you pictured above, the artifact is not so noticeable). If the edges that splits each quad into two triangles is aligned so that it goes between the two vertices with the least height difference between them, then things will look better.

 

I explain this a bit here, under "Additional optimizations":

http://mtnphil.wordpress.com/2011/09/22/terrain-engine/


PARTNERS