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#ActualBacterius

Posted 02 July 2013 - 07:14 AM


If a police officer identifies themselves and asks you to stop, if you flee you are breaking the law.

 

I don't know dude, if someone walked up to my car and started breaking the windows and pulling out their handgun, I think I'd get the hell away even if they could produce a badge. Screw the law, I'd rather stay alive and defend my case rather than end up a statistic shot down by an overzealous cop (let's face it - it does happen).

 

If the situation really happened as described it was an unacceptable show of force and I don't blame the girl for getting the hell away. I mean, six people, in civilian clothing, with handheld guns and other weapons, walking towards you, at night? For all you know they are out there to steal your car and mug you, or worse. At least the first thought to my mind would not be "hey, those are police officers. I'm going to wait till they get here and greet them warmly". Even the most well-meaning person will not respond well to being threatened or put in an ambiguous situation where they feel there is a chance they may be in danger.

 

Again, as said by someone in this thread (did not read it all), the police exists to protect citizens against danger and enforce order on some level. It is not there to terrorize people and beat them into submission. I wouldn't be surprised if a few policemen found their line of work just so they could fulfill their perverted fantasies of domination by abusing the power society has entrusted to them.

 

I think the question here, is what are we arguing about? It's obvious the official report is going to be partly distorted and manipulated. All news is. But somehow I don't think this would have made the headlines if those police officers actually walked over to that girl, identified themselves in a civilized manner and asked to see her purchase. That is perfectly routine and I don't think anyone would fundamentally object to complying unless the cop was being very suspicious. It's clear something much different happened this time, and given that charges were dropped I'm inclined to think the college students didn't actually do anything illegal. But without any further information to go on this is purely speculation.

 

It's all about what really happened, anyway. It's difficult to predict how a given individual will react to such and such behavior, it's very subtle and you really have to know both sides of the story to accurately make up an informed opinion. I would expect people to make the right choice on average, though. There are ways to approach people for information without freaking them out, the one depicted in the report wasn't one of them, period.

 

As for the "iced tea" video, well, even if the so-called officer was being unreasonably obnoxious with his apparent need to perform an extensive molecular analysis of the liquid in question, I think the other guy was being rather dumb showing him the can's label multiple times, obviously that's not what the cop wanted. How hard was it to hand him the can, let him check and embarass himself? That said I've never lived in the USA so I don't know how this is handled over there, do people routinely steal soda cans by pretending to be policemen? Or maybe it's a principle thing, I don't know.. just kind of weird how the two interacted. Feels kind of scripted and fake in fact.


#1Bacterius

Posted 02 July 2013 - 07:10 AM


If a police officer identifies themselves and asks you to stop, if you flee you are breaking the law.

 

I don't know dude, if someone walked up to my car and started breaking the windows and pulling out their handgun, I think I'd get the hell away even if they could produce a badge. Screw the law, I'd rather stay alive and defend my case rather than end up a statistic shot down by an overzealous cop (let's face it - it does happen).

 

If the situation really happened as described it was an unacceptable show of force and I don't blame the girl for getting the hell away. I mean, six people, in civilian clothing, with handheld guns and other weapons, walking towards you, at night? For all you know they are out there to steal your car and mug you, or worse. At least the first thought to my mind would not be "hey, those are police officers. I'm going to wait till they get here and greet them warmly". Even the most well-meaning person will not respond well to being threatened or put in an ambiguous situation where they feel there is a chance they may be in danger.

 

Again, as said by someone in this thread (did not read it all), the police exists to protect citizens against danger and enforce order on some level. It is not there to terrorize people and beat them into submission. I wouldn't be surprised if a few policemen found their line of work just so they could fulfill their perverted fantasies of domination by abusing the power society has entrusted to them.

 

I think the question here, is what are we arguing about? It's obvious the official report is going to be partly distorted and manipulated. All news is. But somehow I don't think this would have made the headlines if those police officers actually walked over to that girl, identified themselves in a civilized manner and asked to see her purchase. That is perfectly routine and I don't think anyone would fundamentally object to complying unless the cop was being very suspicious. It's clear something much different happened this time, and given that charges were dropped I'm inclined to think the college students didn't actually do anything illegal. But without any further information to go on this is purely speculation.

 

As for the "iced tea" video, well, even if the so-called officer was being unreasonably obnoxious with his apparent need to perform an extensive molecular analysis of the liquid in question, I think the other guy was being rather dumb showing him the can's label multiple times, obviously that's not what the cop wanted. How hard was it to hand him the can, let him check and embarass himself? That said I've never lived in the USA so I don't know how this is handled over there, do people routinely steal soda cans by pretending to be policemen? Or maybe it's a principle thing, I don't know.. just kind of weird how the two interacted. Feels kind of scripted and fake in fact.


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