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#ActualJeremy Williams

Posted 10 July 2013 - 07:31 PM

Before I comment on these, can you elaborate on the solider, the lawman/woman, the priest/priestess, and the physician?

 

The physician I think I understand, but I'm trying to understand your logic.

 

 

If you're concerned about the dead children, keep in mind that it is a metaphor. What I can say is the the child in each represents the self. They are that person's individuality, free will and humanity, everything that makes them a person. Any adults present collectively represent other people. The iron hand present in all of these... really doesn't need an explanation, does it? It's an iron hand, it's a stock metaphor. Since it's subtle, I can say the rod represents religion (there's a biblical basis for using a rod to represent religion) and that the heart-shaped boxes represent the "heart" or "soul." I can also say that "metaphor A is metaphor A." If something represents one thing in one symbol, it represents the same thing in all of them.

 

From this, you should be able to figure the rest out.


#3Jeremy Williams

Posted 10 July 2013 - 07:25 PM

Before I comment on these, can you elaborate on the solider, the lawman/woman, the priest/priestess, and the physician?

 

The physician I think I understand, but I'm trying to understand your logic.

 

 

If you're concerned about the dead children, keep in mind that it is a metaphor. What I can say is the the child in each represents the self. They are that person's individuality, free will and humanity, everything that makes them a person. Any adults present collectively represent other people. The iron hand present in all of these... really doesn't need an explanation, does it? It's an iron hand, it's a stock metaphor. Since it's subtle, I can say the rod represents religion (there's a biblical basis for using a rod to represent religion) and that the heart-shaped boxes represent the "heart" or "soul."

 

From this, you should be able to figure the rest out.


#2Jeremy Williams

Posted 10 July 2013 - 07:25 PM

Before I comment on these, can you elaborate on the solider, the lawman/woman, the priest/priestess, and the physician?

 

The physician I think I understand, but I'm trying to understand your logic.

 

 

If you're concerned about the dead children, keep in mind that it is a metaphor. What I can say is the the child in each represents the self. They are that person's individuality, free will and humanity, everything that makes them a person. Any adults present collectively represent other people. The iron hand present in all of these... really doesn't need an explanation, does it? It's an iron hand, it's a stock metaphor. Since it's subtle, I can say the rod represents religion (there's a biblical basis for using a rod to represent religion) and that the heart-shaped boxes represent the soul.

 

From this, you should be able to figure the rest out.


#1Jeremy Williams

Posted 10 July 2013 - 07:24 PM

 

Soldier: A dead child being eaten by a dog, lying inside a black, heart-shaped box held by an iron hand.

Warrior: A child bearing a sword, facing a threshold with a large horned shadow coming through it.

Martial artist: A child, hand up, with a velvet-gloved, iron hand guiding their wrist.

Guardian: A child clutching a heart-shaped box to their chest. Several adults are visible through the box's lid.

Lawman/Lawwoman: A dead child being beaten with an iron fist.

Scout: A child, in a tree, with a looking glass.

Bard: A child with a lute, writing with a quill upon parchment.

Ranger: A child, arm outstretched and a bird landing upon it.

Rogue: A child hiding behind a counter holding a knife and a loaf of bread, before a threshold with a large horned shadow standing in it.

Mystic: A blind child holding a hand of cards: The World, The Fool, The Tower, The Lovers and The Devil.

Savant: A child sitting on a chair, reading a book by candlelight.

Artisan: A child sitting at a desk, sketching.

Noble: A child wearing a black coat, with a red right hand clutching green paper to their abdomen, fingers in their coat.

Worker: A child, holding a pickaxe, being struck with a whip.

Shaman: A child sitting against a tree watching a dog, while the dog watches an owl and the owl watches the child.

Priest/Priestess: A pile of burning books and an iron fist beating a dead child with a rod.

Physician: A headless child kneeling next to a beheaded adult, trying to put the adult's head back on.

Wizard/Witch: A child wearing goggles, holding a vial and a quill.

Sorcerer/Sorceress: A child, arms outstretched like wings, flying through the sky.

Mage: A child with a looking glass, sitting on the crescent moon.

If nobody can figure this out in three days, I'll explain the lot of them. Don't be afraid to spitball.

 

Before I comment on these, can you elaborate on the solider, the lawman/woman, the priest/priestess, and the physician?

 

The physician I think I understand, but I'm trying to understand your logic.

 

 

If you're concerned about the dead children, keep in mind that it is a metaphor. What I can say is the the child in each represents the self. They are that person's individuality, free will and humanity, everything that makes them a person. Any adults present collectively represent other people. The iron hand present in all of these... really doesn't need an explanation, does it? It's an iron hand, it's a stock metaphor. Since it's subtle, I can say the rod represents religion (there's a biblical basis for using a rod to represent religion) and that the heart-shaped boxes represent the soul.

 

From this, you should be able to figure the rest out.


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