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#ActualSector0

Posted 12 July 2013 - 07:35 AM

 

Is this quaternion multiplication or slerp?
D3DXQUATERNION q_t_pose = GetTPoseQuaternion(BoneID);
D3DXQUATERNION q1 = GetQuaternionFromAnimation(Walking, BoneID, time);
D3DXQUATERNION q2 = GetQuaternionFromAnimation(Shooting, BoneID, time);
D3DXQUATERNION q3 = GetQuaternionFromAnimation(Hit, BoneID, time);

D3DXQUATERNION qFinal = q3 * q2 * q1 * q_t_pose;

D3DXMATRIX BoneMatrix;
D3DXMatrixRotationQuaternion(&BoneMatrix, &qFinal);

//Combine all BoneMatrices to a final skeleton for use for skinning vertices

 

 

This is quaternion mutiplication. Actaully this means that first you rotate your object with q_t_pose then with q1 next q2 and q3 respectively. This can be used for additive animation bledning but is not suitable for mixing animations.

 

 

 

So, is this how I should Animate characters?
CPU:
1. Build T-Pose bones in Dual Quaternion form.
2. Create a list of animation tracks to blend and set a weight for each track.
3. For each bone, enter every animation track and get the Bone Quaternion at time t by Slerp(key1, key2, t'),  convert it to Dual Quaternion, weight it and add it to T-Pose bone.
4. Combine all T-Pose bones which are now animated and send the skeleton to the GPU.

 

 

This procedure is OK as far as you normalize the weights. For the dual quaternions i have to say that i've never used it and know a little about it. I always use quaternions and it responds very well for rotations on CPU. I think you can use quaternions in CPU computations for animation blending. I have no idea about GPU computations.

 

 

I found an article describing "nlerp" http://number-none.com/product/Understanding%20Slerp,%20Then%20Not%20Using%20It/ . Supposedly it is more CPU friendly than Slerp and supposedly it is commutative, meaning I can blend the animation tracks in any order with the same results. Anyone here have experience with nlerp?

 

 

I have worked with nlerp before. I prefer to use nlerp when i want the animation LOD to be low. nlerp takes less computation. It can be calculated like this:

 

nlerp(q1, q2, t) = (1-t ) * q1 + t * q2;

 

Slerp is more accurate but it takes more computations because it has to extract the quaternions and calculate many sin, cos, arccos and again multiply them. You can consider this example for using slerp:

 

Lets assume that you want to create a side scroller action shooter and you have 3 animations for aiming. One is aiming 90 degrees up, other is aiming forward with 0 degree with respect to horizon and the third is aiming 90 degrees down. You want to blend between these three animations for character aiming. You get the mouse world position and calculate its difference with your character's world position. Then you calculate the deviation by using the vector dot multiplication of the resulted aim direction and character forward vector. The result shows that the deviation degree is 45. Now you want to blend between aim_up_90 and aim_forward animations so your character can target the mouse cursor with 45 degrees with respect to horizon. If you use slerp blending like this:

 

Slerp (aim_forward_key, aim_up_90_key, 45/90)

 

You will catch accurate results. Your character aims at 45. But if you use nlerp your character never looks at 45 degree. For example he might look at 30 degrees while the mouse aim is at 45 degrees. So it would be great to use nlerp for the purposes which the accurate blending is not really matters.

 

In other words, by using quaternion Slerp you can rotate one vector to another linearly with respect to degrees between them.


#1Sector0

Posted 12 July 2013 - 03:09 AM

 

Is this quaternion multiplication or slerp?
D3DXQUATERNION q_t_pose = GetTPoseQuaternion(BoneID);
D3DXQUATERNION q1 = GetQuaternionFromAnimation(Walking, BoneID, time);
D3DXQUATERNION q2 = GetQuaternionFromAnimation(Shooting, BoneID, time);
D3DXQUATERNION q3 = GetQuaternionFromAnimation(Hit, BoneID, time);

D3DXQUATERNION qFinal = q3 * q2 * q1 * q_t_pose;

D3DXMATRIX BoneMatrix;
D3DXMatrixRotationQuaternion(&BoneMatrix, &qFinal);

//Combine all BoneMatrices to a final skeleton for use for skinning vertices

 

 

This is quaternion mutiplication. Actaully this means that first you rotate your object with q_t_pose then with q1 next q2 and q3 respectively. This can be used for additive animation bledning but is not suitable for mixing animations.

 

 

 

So, is this how I should Animate characters?
CPU:
1. Build T-Pose bones in Dual Quaternion form.
2. Create a list of animation tracks to blend and set a weight for each track.
3. For each bone, enter every animation track and get the Bone Quaternion at time t by Slerp(key1, key2, t'),  convert it to Dual Quaternion, weight it and add it to T-Pose bone.
4. Combine all T-Pose bones which are now animated and send the skeleton to the GPU.

 

 

This procedure is OK as far as you normalize the weights. For the dual quaternions i have to say that i've never used it and know a little about it. I always use quaternions and it responds very well for rotations on CPU. I think you can use them at least in CPU computations. I have no idea about GPU computations.

 

 

I found an article describing "nlerp" http://number-none.com/product/Understanding%20Slerp,%20Then%20Not%20Using%20It/ . Supposedly it is more CPU friendly than Slerp and supposedly it is commutative, meaning I can blend the animation tracks in any order with the same results. Anyone here have experience with nlerp?

 

 

I have worked with nlerp before. I prefer to use nlerp when i want the animation LOD to be low. nlerp takes less computation. It can be calculated like this:

 

nlerp(q1, q2, t) = (1-t ) * q1 + t * q2;

 

Slerp is more accurate but it takes more computations because it has to extract the quaternions and calculate many sin, cos, arccos and again multiply them. You can consider this example for using slerp:

 

Lets assume that you want to create a side scroller action shooter and you have 3 animations for aiming. One is aiming 90 degrees up, other is aiming forward with 0 degree with respect to horizon and the third is aiming 90 degrees down. You want to blend between these three animations for character aiming. You get the mouse world position and calculate its difference with your character's world position. Then you calculate the deviation by using the vector dot multiplication of the resulted aim direction and character forward vector. The result shows that the deviation degree is 45. Now you want to blend between aim_up_90 and aim_forward animations so your character can target the mouse cursor with 45 degrees with respect to horizon. If you use slerp blending like this:

 

Slerp (aim_forward_key, aim_up_90_key, 45/90)

 

You will catch accurate results. Your character aims at 45. But if you use nlerp your character never looks at 45 degree. For example he might look at 30 degrees while the mouse aim is at 45 degrees. So it would be great to use nlerp for the purposes which the accurate blending is not really matters.

 

In other words, by using quaternion Slerp you can rotate one vector to another linearly with respect to degrees between them.


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