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#ActualHodgman

Posted 13 July 2013 - 09:37 AM

Yes, this applies to pretty much any skill. Another version of this rule that I've seen is 10 years of practice (~1000 hours a year I guess).

I prefer this version, because it's possible for someone to cram 10000 hours of practice into 3/4 years, but that person will still likely only be a beginner -- such as a university graduate about to enter their first job in a 'junior' role.

 

Every year that I've used C++ after the first year, I've felt like I was a C++ expert.

Every single year, I've looked back at my skills from 12 months prior, and realised I was in no way an expert (but still thinking that now I am...).

After about 12 years, this slowed down, and I started to feel ok with where my expertise was at a year prior, so I guess that was the beginnings of C++ mastery.

I've now been using C++ for about 15 years, and have still almost mastered it.

 

Looking back, at my younger selves with my current level of knowledge -- if I was interviewing them for a job, I probably wouldn't see them as being a "good C++ programmer" (something I'm now a tough critic on) until the version of me that's somewhere around the 10-11 years of practice mark ;)

 

That's just one aspect of programming though. I don't have the same level of mastery in gameplay programming, or special effects, or PHP, or SQL, or any of the other countless technologies and fields that a programmer will come into contact with ;)


#3Hodgman

Posted 13 July 2013 - 09:34 AM

Yes, this applies to pretty much any skill. Another version of this rule that I've seen is 10 years of practice (~1000 hours a year I guess).

 

Every year that I've used C++ after the first year, I've felt like I was a C++ expert.

Every single year, I've looked back at my skills from 12 months prior, and realised I was in no way an expert (but still thinking that now I am...).

After about 12 years, this slowed down, and I started to feel ok with where my expertise was at a year prior, so I guess that was the beginnings of C++ mastery.

I've now been using C++ for about 15 years, and have still almost mastered it.

 

Looking back, at my younger selves with my current level of knowledge -- if I was interviewing them for a job, I probably wouldn't see them as being a "good C++ programmer" (something I'm now a tough critic on) until the version of me that's somewhere around the 10-11 years of practice mark ;)

 

That's just one aspect of programming though. I don't have the same level of mastery in gameplay programming, or special effects, or PHP, or SQL, or any of the other countless technologies and fields that a programmer will come into contact with ;)


#2Hodgman

Posted 13 July 2013 - 09:31 AM

Yes, this applies to pretty much any skill. Another version of this rule that I've seen is 10 years of practice (~1000 hours a year I guess).

 

Every year that I've used C++ after the first year, I've felt like I was a C++ expert.

Every single year, I've looked back at my skills from 12 months prior, and realised I was in no way an expert (but I am now).

After about 12 years, this slowed down, and I feel ok with where my expertise was at a year prior.

I've now been using C++ for about 15 years, and have still almost mastered it.

 

Looking back, at my younger selves with my current level of knowledge -- if I was interviewing them for a job, I probably wouldn't see them as being a "good C++ programmer" (something I'm now a tough critic on) until the version of me that's somewhere around the 10-11 years of practice mark ;)


#1Hodgman

Posted 13 July 2013 - 09:31 AM

Yes, this applies to pretty much any skill. Another version of this rule that I've seen is 10 years of practice (~1000 hours a year I guess).

 

Every year that I've used C++ after the first year, I've felt like I was a C++ expert.

Every single year, I've looked back at my skills from 12 months prior, and realised I was in no way an expert (but I am now).

After about 12 years, this slowed down, and I feel ok with where my expertise was at a year prior.

I've now been using C++ for about 15 years, and have almost mastered it.

 

Looking back, at my younger selves with my current level of knowledge -- if I was interviewing them for a job, I probably wouldn't see them as being a "good C++ programmer" (something I'm now a tough critic on) until the version of me that's somewhere around the 10-11 years of practice mark ;)


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