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#ActualInvalidPointer

Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:58 PM

Just throwing this out there, I think the problem is more that most of the classical BRDFs used in rendering are designed to be 'one-shot' in the sense they don't offer a breakdown for diffuse and specular terms. When a theoretical graphics programmer is using said BRDFs as intended, there's no energy competition between the two terms, and  our 'diffuse Fresnel' problem goes away. In fact, the reason we have these models more has to do with the rather crappy indirect lighting situation most games find themselves in-- we have to get a little more bang for our buck from existing point lights, etc. so we have a sort of multilayered BRDF approach that's designed to show detail not immediately in the specular area of influence.

 

EDIT: Yeah, I wrote this on reduced sleep and in a rush to get to work; I'm not sure where I was going with the whole GI/multilayer BRDF thing. See MJP's post below for a nice explanation of what I think I was originally going for wink.png


#1InvalidPointer

Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:38 AM

Just throwing this out there, I think the problem is more that most of the classical BRDFs used in rendering are designed to be 'one-shot' in the sense they don't offer a breakdown for diffuse and specular terms. When a theoretical graphics programmer is using said BRDFs as intended, there's no energy competition between the two terms, and  our 'diffuse Fresnel' problem goes away. In fact, the reason we have these models more has to do with the rather crappy indirect lighting situation most games find themselves in-- we have to get a little more bang for our buck from existing point lights, etc. so we have a sort of multilayered BRDF approach that's designed to show detail not immediately in the specular area of influence.


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