Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


Read more in this forum topic or make sure you're signed up (from the right-hand sidebar on the homepage) and read Thursday's newsletter to get in the running!


#ActualRavyne

Posted 22 July 2013 - 03:02 PM

One final note, is that some of the less-expensive "720p" televisions you can find are actually 1366x768 panels that internally upscale the 720p signal, and there's very little you can do about it. I suggest you just write those off, as they're relatively uncommon anyway.

 

Also, 720p televisions themselves are getting scarcer, enough people still have them that it matters, but there are very few new production 720p televisions. If you absolutely cannot do with 640x360 *AND* you absolutely do not have the budget or means to do 2x oversize art or separate hand-drawn assets, design first for 1080p, and provide a simple fallback for 720p -- either accepting non-perfect scaling, or letterboxing in 720p with an active screen area of 960x540.


#2Ravyne

Posted 22 July 2013 - 03:02 PM

One final note, is that some of the less-expensive "720p" televisions you can find are actually 1366x768 panels that internally upscale the 720p signal, and there's very little you can do about it. I suggest you just write those off, as they're relatively uncommon anyway.

 

Also, 720p televisions themselves are getting scarcer, enough people still have them that it matters, but there are very few new production 720p televisions. If you absolutely cannot do with 540x360 *AND* you absolutely do not have the budget or means to do 2x oversize art or separate hand-drawn assets, design first for 1080p, and provide a simple fallback for 720p -- either accepting non-perfect scaling, or letterboxing in 720p with an active screen area of 960x540.


#1Ravyne

Posted 22 July 2013 - 02:57 PM

One final note, is that some of the less-expensive "720p" televisions you can find are actually 1366x768 panels that internally upscale the 720p signal, and there's very little you can do about it. I suggest you just write those off, as they're relatively uncommon anyway. Also, 720p televisions themselves are getting scarcer, enough people still have them that it matters, but there are very few new production 720p televisions.


PARTNERS