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#ActualSimonForsman

Posted 29 July 2013 - 06:13 PM

 

One notable major site which uses Flash and which almost guarantees that Flash will not die out any time soon is Youtube.

 

I'd not ride much money on that bet if I were you.

 

Netflix is ditching SIlverlight for HTML5 video streaming -- If you visit Netflix with the IE 11 beta, it comes down over HTML5 today even. Then, you have the fact that Youtube is owned by Google, and Google are huge proponents of HTML5 and their VP8 codec, and it would appear pretty clear that they'll want to ditch flash ASAP. It may not be ready for adoption today, but Google is biding its time I'm sure. Once its feasible, flash will disappear from youtube in the blink of an eye. That's where my money is, anyhow. I think we're talking months, not years.

 

On the larger topic of flash -- Flash on the web is dead/dying now. Its just not a possibility on all of the different kinds of devices we use today, and with HTML5 and Javascript becoming more and more capable, and more and more proven, everyone's moving away from flash on the web. Even Adobe is repackaging flash as a way to make off-line apps (which, you'll recall was part of Microsoft's failed strategy for Silverlight). Where I think that Adobe might "save flash" or at least some part of it, is by repackaging the flash tooling as an authoring environment for HTML5 content. Really, the flash run time was inconsequential -- it was necessary at the time to deliver flash content -- but the value has always been in the tools. 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/html5

 

Google is working on it, you can use youtube without flash today if you want.

 

Adobe is working on it aswell, the latest version of Flash professional can export animations to HTML5 and i wouldn't be surprised if future versions will be able to export interactive content (scripts etc) as well.


#2SimonForsman

Posted 29 July 2013 - 06:13 PM

 

One notable major site which uses Flash and which almost guarantees that Flash will not die out any time soon is Youtube.

 

I'd not ride much money on that bet if I were you.

 

Netflix is ditching SIlverlight for HTML5 video streaming -- If you visit Netflix with the IE 11 beta, it comes down over HTML5 today even. Then, you have the fact that Youtube is owned by Google, and Google are huge proponents of HTML5 and their VP8 codec, and it would appear pretty clear that they'll want to ditch flash ASAP. It may not be ready for adoption today, but Google is biding its time I'm sure. Once its feasible, flash will disappear from youtube in the blink of an eye. That's where my money is, anyhow. I think we're talking months, not years.

 

On the larger topic of flash -- Flash on the web is dead/dying now. Its just not a possibility on all of the different kinds of devices we use today, and with HTML5 and Javascript becoming more and more capable, and more and more proven, everyone's moving away from flash on the web. Even Adobe is repackaging flash as a way to make off-line apps (which, you'll recall was part of Microsoft's failed strategy for Silverlight). Where I think that Adobe might "save flash" or at least some part of it, is by repackaging the flash tooling as an authoring environment for HTML5 content. Really, the flash run time was inconsequential -- it was necessary at the time to deliver flash content -- but the value has always been in the tools. 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/html5

 

Google is working on it, you can use youtube without flash today if you want.

 

Adobe is working on it aswell, the latest version of Flash professional can export animations to HTML5 and i wouldn't be surprised if future versions will be able to export interactive content (scripts etc) as well.


#1SimonForsman

Posted 29 July 2013 - 06:11 PM

 

One notable major site which uses Flash and which almost guarantees that Flash will not die out any time soon is Youtube.

 

I'd not ride much money on that bet if I were you.

 

Netflix is ditching SIlverlight for HTML5 video streaming -- If you visit Netflix with the IE 11 beta, it comes down over HTML5 today even. Then, you have the fact that Youtube is owned by Google, and Google are huge proponents of HTML5 and their VP8 codec, and it would appear pretty clear that they'll want to ditch flash ASAP. It may not be ready for adoption today, but Google is biding its time I'm sure. Once its feasible, flash will disappear from youtube in the blink of an eye. That's where my money is, anyhow. I think we're talking months, not years.

 

On the larger topic of flash -- Flash on the web is dead/dying now. Its just not a possibility on all of the different kinds of devices we use today, and with HTML5 and Javascript becoming more and more capable, and more and more proven, everyone's moving away from flash on the web. Even Adobe is repackaging flash as a way to make off-line apps (which, you'll recall was part of Microsoft's failed strategy for Silverlight). Where I think that Adobe might "save flash" or at least some part of it, is by repackaging the flash tooling as an authoring environment for HTML5 content. Really, the flash run time was inconsequential -- it was necessary at the time to deliver flash content -- but the value has always been in the tools. 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/html5

 

Google is working on it, you can use youtube without flash today if you want.


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