Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


Read more in this forum topic or make sure you're signed up (from the right-hand sidebar on the homepage) and read Thursday's newsletter to get in the running!


#ActualHodgman

Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:36 PM

If you're going for a programming job, then a strong maths background will always be a plus that sets you apart from others.

 

There's lots of programming tasks where a strong mathematician might be able to solve the task in a more elegant way than someone who's "just a programmer" -- but in those situations, programming is the primary task, and maths is a secondary tool that helps you complete the primary task.

 

In a games programming team, someone who's an expert programmer + a basic mathematician will be more often useful than someone who's an expert mathematician + a basic programmer :/

But, an average programmer + expert mathematician will be a lot more useful than an average programmer + average mathematician.

 

There's not that much need to be a maths expert for general games work - linear algebra and trigonometry are the most common areas that games programmers will require, and a few tasks will require a basic understanding of calculus too.

As a graphics programmer, I read a lot of research papers (this is also true for other specialists too), which often contain compact a lot of their content down into a few dense lines of formal math, instead of pages of code, so a strong maths background would help a lot with these research tasks.

 

At some companies, there might be room for a good statistician / "data miner" to develop tools to analyse large volumes of raw data collected from customers.

 

In the "gaming industry" (i.e. gambling, not video games), mathematicians can earn a lot of money working as a "game designer" -- the choice of symbols, ordering and rules in gambling games (like video poker / slot machines) is based on extremely refined and deliberate choices made by mathematicians... There's also complex formal proofs (and monte-carlo simulations) required to show that the game rules deliver a certain amount of profit (high enough to satisfy the casinos, and low enough to satisfy the government).


#3Hodgman

Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:34 PM

If you're going for a programming job, then a strong maths background will always be a plus that sets you apart from others.

 

There's lots of programming tasks where a strong mathematician might be able to solve the task in a more elegant way than someone who's "just a programmer" -- but in those situations, programming is the primary task, and maths is a secondary tool that helps you complete the primary task.

 

In a games programming team, someone who's an expert programmer + a basic mathematician will be more often useful than someone who's an expert mathematician + a basic programmer :/

But, an average programmer + expert mathematician will be a lot more useful than an average programmer + average mathematician.

 

There's not that much need to be a maths expert for general games work - linear algebra and trigonometry are the most common areas that games programmers will require, and a few tasks will require a basic understanding of calculus too.

As a graphics programmer, I read a lot of research papers (this is also true for other specialists too), which often contain compact a lot of their content down into a few dense lines of formal math, instead of pages of code, so a strong maths background would help a lot with these research tasks.

 

In the "gaming industry" (i.e. gambling, not video games), mathematicians can earn a lot of money working as a "game designer" -- the choice of symbols, ordering and rules in gambling games (like video poker / slot machines) is based on extremely refined and deliberate choices made by mathematicians... There's also complex formal proofs (and monte-carlo simulations) required to show that the game rules deliver a certain amount of profit (high enough to satisfy the casinos, and low enough to satisfy the government).


#2Hodgman

Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:32 PM

If you're going for a programming job, then a strong maths background will always be a plus that sets you apart from others.

 

There's lots of programming tasks where a strong mathematician might be able to solve the task in a more elegant way than someone who's "just a programmer" -- but in those situations, programming is the primary task, and maths is a secondary tool that helps you complete the primary task.

 

In a games programming team, someone who's an expert programmer + a basic mathematician will be more often useful than someone who's an expert mathematician + a basic programmer :/

But, an average programmer + expert mathematician will be a lot more useful than an average programmer + average mathematician.

 

There's not that much need to be a maths expert for general games work - linear algebra and trigonometry are the most common areas that games programmers will require, and a few tasks will require a basic understanding of calculus too.

As a graphics programmer, I read a lot of research papers (this is also true for other specialists too), which often contain compact a lot of their content down into a few dense lines of formal math, instead of pages of code, so a strong maths background would help a lot with these research tasks.

 

In the "gaming industry" (i.e. gambling, not video games), mathematicians can earn a lot of money working as a "game designer" -- the choice of symbols, ordering and rules in gambling games (like video poker / slot machines) is based on extremely refined and deliberate choices made by mathematicians...


#1Hodgman

Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:28 PM

If you're going for a programming job, then a strong maths background will always be a plus that sets you apart from others.

 

There's lots of programming tasks where a strong mathematician might be able to solve the task in a more elegant way than someone who's "just a programmer" -- but in those situations, programming is the primary tasks, and maths is a secondary tool that helps you complete the primary task.

 

There's not that much need to be a maths expert - linear algebra and trigonometry are the most common areas that games programmers will require, and graphics programmers will require an understanding of calculus too.

As a graphics programmer, I read a lot of research papers (this is also true for other specialists too), which often contain compact a lot of their content down into a few dense lines of formal math, instead of pages of code, so a strong maths background would help with these research tasks.

 

In the "gaming industry" (i.e. gambling, not video games), mathematicians can earn a lot of money working as a "game designer" -- the choice of symbols, ordering and rules in gambling games (like video poker / slot machines) is based on extremely refined and deliberate choices made by mathematicians...


PARTNERS