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#Actualnsmadsen

Posted 01 August 2013 - 08:20 PM

3. This last tip has to do with creating a smooth music loop. For some reason, when saving as an mp3 in Sound Forge, there is always extra space added to the front and end of the track. My final step before sending it to the developer is opening it in Audacity (which is free) and trimming the ends. Why Audacity does this and not a much more expensive program (Sound Forge)...I have no clue 

 

Hmmm, provided that you're still bouncing out an MP3 file after editing the silent bookends in Audacity, this tip actually wont fix the loop. The MP3 codec itself is placing those silent bookends (it gets more harsh the lower the bit rate), so editing out the bookends and re-exporting out an MP3 means they'll still be there. This is not the fault of Sound Forge. A better solution would be: 

 

1) Selecting another format that is still lossy so as not to hurt performance/footprint. OGG can work well and Apple's CAF can do a good job too - especially in the hands of a good programmer. 

 

2) Use code to "subtract" those bookends. Some middleware applications, like Unity, will do this for you! If you're not using middleware, a quick Google search will yield several hits for how others have solved this issue. 

 

3) I used to use a program called MP3Trim which could set the playback regions to remove those bookends. It wasn't the best method and now it's practically unusable due to a bad developer patch that was released. I emailed the creator but never heard back so I've dropped it as a viable option. But perhaps there are other apps that work better now. 


#3nsmadsen

Posted 01 August 2013 - 08:19 PM

3. This last tip has to do with creating a smooth music loop. For some reason, when saving as an mp3 in Sound Forge, there is always extra space added to the front and end of the track. My final step before sending it to the developer is opening it in Audacity (which is free) and trimming the ends. Why Audacity does this and not a much more expensive program (Sound Forge)...I have no clue 

 

Hmmm, provided that you're still bouncing out an MP3 file after editing the silent bookends in Audacity, this tip actually wont fix the loop. The MP3 codec itself is placing those silent bookends (it gets more harsh the lower the bit rate), so editing out the bookends and re-exporting out an MP3 means they'll still be there. This is not the fault of Sound Forge. A better solution would be: 

 

1) Selecting another format that is still lossy so as not to hurt performance/footprint. OGG can work well and Apple's CAF can do a good job too - especially in the hands of a good programmer. 

 

2) Use code to "subtract" those bookends. Some middleware applications, like Unity, will do this for you! 

 

3) I used to use a program called MP3Trim which could set the playback regions to remove those bookends. It wasn't the best method and now it's practically unusable due to a bad developer patch that was released. I emailed the creator but never heard back so I've dropped it as a viable option. But perhaps there are other apps that work better now. 


#2nsmadsen

Posted 01 August 2013 - 08:19 PM

3. This last tip has to do with creating a smooth music loop. For some reason, when saving as an mp3 in Sound Forge, there is always extra space added to the front and end of the track. My final step before sending it to the developer is opening it in Audacity (which is free) and trimming the ends. Why Audacity does this and not a much more expensive program (Sound Forge)...I have no clue 

smile.png

 

Hmmm, provided that you're still bouncing out an MP3 file after editing the silent bookends in Audacity, this tip actually wont fix the loop. The MP3 codec itself is placing those silent bookends (it gets more harsh the lower the bit rate), so editing out the bookends and re-exporting out an MP3 means they'll still be there. This is not the fault of Sound Forge. A better solution would be: 

 

1) Selecting another format that is still lossy so as not to hurt performance/footprint. OGG can work well and Apple's CAF can do a good job too - especially in the hands of a good programmer. 

 

2) Use code to "subtract" those bookends. Some middleware applications, like Unity, will do this for you! 

 

3) I used to use a program called MP3Trim which could set the playback regions to remove those bookends. It wasn't the best method and now it's practically unusable due to a bad developer patch that was released. I emailed the creator but never heard back so I've dropped it as a viable option. But perhaps there are other apps that work better now. 


#1nsmadsen

Posted 01 August 2013 - 08:18 PM

3. This last tip has to do with creating a smooth music loop. For some reason, when saving as an mp3 in Sound Forge, there is always extra space added to the front and end of the track. My final step before sending it to the developer is opening it in Audacity (which is free) and trimming the ends. Why Audacity does this and not a much more expensive program (Sound Forge)...I have no clue 
smile.png

 

Hmmm, provided that you're still bouncing out an MP3 file after editing the silent bookends in Audacity, this tip actually wont fix the loop. The MP3 codec itself is placing those silent bookends (it gets more harsh the lower the bit rate), so editing out the bookends and re-exporting out an MP3 means they'll still be there. This is not the fault of Sound Forge. A better solution would be: 

 

1) Selecting another format that is still lossy so as not to hurt performance/footprint or

 

2) Use code to "subtract" those bookends. Some middleware applications, like Unity, will do this for you! Finally, 

 

3) I used to use a program called MP3Trim which could set the playback regions to remove those bookends. It wasn't the best method and now it's practically unusable due to a bad developer patch that was released. I emailed the creator but never heard back so I've dropped it as a viable option. But perhaps there are other apps that work better now. 


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