Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Banner advertising on our site currently available from just $5!


1. Learn about the promo. 2. Sign up for GDNet+. 3. Set up your advert!


#ActualCDProp

Posted 02 August 2013 - 10:21 PM

I wanted to try to keep this as succinct as possible, because I'm definitely sensitive to the fact that no one wants to read paragraphs upon paragraphs of some schmoe's biography. However, I can't decide what else to cut. So, I apologize for the length, but if you are a professional game programmer (especially a graphics or engine programmer), I would be much obliged if you could read this monstrosity and give me whatever advice you can give. I desperately need direction!

 

I am one of the countless programmers who got their foot in the door without a degree. In 2006, I got a job at a local game developer as a sort of build engineer. By the end of my first project, I had automated most of my job, and so I had the programmers on my team give me some basic programming tasks to work on. I eventually became a full-time programmer. In 2008, the company went bust, and so I lost my job.

 

It turns out that two and a half years of game programming experience at a defunct (and honestly, crappy) game development studio does not make for a great resume, especially if you don't have a degree. So, I took a low-paying job at a very tiny web development company (think "working-in-some-dude's-basement" tiny). I had to learn a completely new skill set. There, I did both back end (Perl, MySQL) and front-end (HTML, JQuery w/ AJAX, CSS) stuff. Unfortunately, that company also went bust 5 months later.

 

Shortly after that, in late 2009, I found another job as a graphics programmer for a simulation company. This is my current job, and I've been here for almost 4 years.

 

So that about brings you current on my job history.

 

As you can probably tell, at the time that I was hired for my current position, they weren't looking for a graphics programming guru (if they were, they would not have hired someone with so little experience!). They were just looking for a good, smart programmer who could take ownership of the visual side of things. During the interview process, I programmed a very simple DX9 demo involving a pool of water (environment mapped reflections, refractions, fresnel), and an archway that casted a planar shadow. I modeled everything myself in Blender and exported it to a custom (albeit simplistic) file format using a script I wrote in Python. The company uses OpenGL, which I had no experience with, but I guess they decided that I knew enough about graphics to take ownership of their visual side of things.

 

The problem I am having with this job is that they have decided that their graphics fidelity needs are very modest, and so they've made realistic graphics programming an extremely low priority. Most of the time, they fill my plate with tasks that are only peripherally-related to graphics programming. For instance, they began work on a new level editor, and they needed me to code all of the 3D GUI stuff for it (dropping objects into the scene, picking, moving, rotating them, etc.). It turns out that this is 80% of the programming needed on it, and I quickly became THE owner of the level editor, responsible for the other 20% as well. For the first two years of this job, about 90% of what I did was related to this level editor. I essentially felt like a tools programmer, not a graphics programmer.

 

Edit: There are many other examples of non-graphics stuff that they've had me work on. but for the sake of brevity, I won't list them!

 

 

Meanwhile, I'm trying to get them excited about updating their graphics fidelity. When I first got there, their graphics already looked old (think original Half-Life, but with higher-res textures). I've done a few things over the years to update the graphics (added some normal mapping, gloss mapping, splatting to reduce the tiled look in grass and dirt textures -- all stuff that has been commonplace for more than a decade). When you combine this with the third-party libraries that I've integrated for ocean and sky rendering, the graphics look quite a bit nicer than they once did. But they still look horrendously out-dated. 

 

I thought I had them convinced, at one point, that we really needed to change things. They gave me the go-ahead to re-architect the visual software from the ground-up so that it would be more flexible. The old visual software was so static; it was full of hard-coded behavior and ad-hoc hacks, and adding new stuff to it was very cumbersome. So, I took several months to reformulate things, and we just shipped our first project on the new architecture. Yay! I'm ready to add some new awesome effects.

 

But now they are loading my plate with more menial tasks that, at this point, I feel like would be better-handled by a junior programmer under my direction. We still have a long way to go on the graphics front. I haven't even been able to sell them on the importance of HDR yet, for example. We're still using simple single-buffer shadow mapping, and so we don't have full-scene shadows. I try to stay abreast of new developments, and I keep reading about things that I really want to do -- tiled light culling for nighttime simulations with lots of headlights and other work lights, image-based reflections to make the rain effects look more realistic, etc. -- that I think have practical value for the company, but I'm having a tough time selling them on it.

 

I really do understand, to some extent. The items they are having me work on are things that the customers are asking for, and there really isn't anyone else in the company who work in this area. However, I don't know if this is working for me anymore. I need a steep learning curve that I can climb. I feel like I'm on a plateau.

 

So I know what you're probably thinking. "Why not work on these projects in your own time, and then present them to the company when you have a working demo?"

 

And the truth is, I do work on side-projects such as this. However, it is extremely slow going because I am also in school. You may remember from the beginning of this tome that I did not have a degree when I started. Well, I started school about two and a half years ago, and I'm now about halfway toward a bachelor's degree in physics.* I am going full time, and the courses aren't easy. In order to maintain a good GPA (currently 3.93), I easily spend 30-40 hours per week on school. This is in addition to work, which often demands 50- or 60-hour weeks during crunch times. Yes, I have some weeks where I spend 90+ hours on work and school (although 70 is far more frequent).

 

I also have a family, and so I find myself with precious little time for side projects. I feel like I'm in one of those "Pick Two" situations: work, school, side-projects.

 

I'm really loath to quit school. I am just over halfway through, so why quit now? A degree might not be as important now as it was in the beginning of my career, but I'm not a quitter. Plus, I'm really excited about what I'm learning in my physics and math classes. I'm also currently working on some undergrad research involving crystals and electric field gradients, which I find really interesting and fun.

 

I am also loath to quit my job. I can't afford it, first of all. I also don't want the gap in my work history. Plus, I really like it where I work. These complaints aside, it's a great place to work, with nice people. They've been kind enough to take a chance on me, back when my graphics programming skills were unproven, and they have been very flexible with scheduling while I go to school. I feel that I owe them some loyalty.

 

But I also feel that, if I spend a year or two more in this "Graphics Programming Kiddie Pool", it's going to severely stunt my career. People are going to start wondering why I spent 6 years as a graphics programmer and haven't even implemented a good tone mapping operator before. 

 

What should I do?

 

 

* Why physics? I would probably learn a lot from a CS degree, but I thought something cross-disciplinary would be more fun. It's not as though graphics is completely without a basics in physics, and most gaming and simulation companies seem to value knowledge in physics. So, why not?


#1CDProp

Posted 02 August 2013 - 10:14 PM

I wanted to try to keep this as succinct as possible, because I'm definitely sensitive to the fact that no one wants to read paragraphs upon paragraphs of some schmoe's biography. However, I can't decide what else to cut. So, I apologize for the length, but if you are a professional game programmer (especially a graphics or engine programmer), I would be much obliged if you could read this monstrosity and give me whatever advice you can give. I desperately need direction!

 

I am one of the countless programmers who got their foot in the door without a degree. In 2006, I got a job at a local game developer as a sort of build engineer. By the end of my first project, I had automated most of my job, and so I had the programmers on my team give me some basic programming tasks to work on. I eventually became a full-time programmer. In 2008, the company went bust, and so I lost my job.

 

It turns out that two and a half years of game programming experience at a defunct (and honestly, crappy) game development studio does not make for a great resume, especially if you don't have a degree. So, I took a low-paying job at a very tiny web development company (think "working-in-some-dude's-basement" tiny). I had to learn a completely new skill set. There, I did both back end (Perl, MySQL) and front-end (HTML, JQuery w/ AJAX, CSS) stuff. Unfortunately, that company also went bust 5 months later.

 

Shortly after that, in late 2009, I found another job as a graphics programmer for a simulation company. This is my current job, and I've been here for almost 4 years.

 

So that about brings you current on my job history.

 

As you can probably tell, at the time that I was hired for my current position, they weren't looking for a graphics programming guru (if they were, they would not have hired someone with so little experience!). They were just looking for a good, smart programmer who could take ownership of the visual side of things. During the interview process, I programmed a very simple DX9 demo involving a pool of water (environment mapped reflections, refractions, fresnel), and an archway that casted a planar shadow. I modeled everything myself in Blender and exported it to a custom (albeit simplistic) file format using a script I wrote in Python. The company uses OpenGL, which I had no experience with, but I guess they decided that I knew enough about graphics to take ownership of their visual side of things.

 

The problem I am having with this job is that they have decided that their graphics fidelity needs are very modest, and so they've made realistic graphics programming an extremely low priority. Most of the time, they fill my plate with tasks that are only peripherally-related to graphics programming. For instance, they began work on a new level editor, and they needed me to code all of the 3D GUI stuff for it (dropping objects into the scene, picking, moving, rotating them, etc.). It turns out that this is 80% of the programming needed on it, and I quickly became THE owner of the level editor, responsible for the other 20% as well. For the first two years of this job, about 90% of what I did was related to this level editor. I essentially felt like a tools programmer, not a graphics programmer.

 

Other examples of tasks that they've loaded onto my plate to keep me busy: an alignment tool (for easy setup of the correct projection matrices needed for each visual channel), integrating other 3rd party graphics libraries for sky and ocean rendering, PiP insets, mirrors, and so on. These are all features that our customers ask for, and so I understand why it's important to have them, and I understand why I am the guy to do it. And don't get me wrong -- some of this stuff was truly challenging for me in the beginning, but now it's very tedious and not even remotely challenging work.

 

Meanwhile, I'm trying to get them excited about updating their graphics fidelity. When I first got there, their graphics already looked old (think original Half-Life, but with higher-res textures). I've done a few things over the years to update the graphics (added some normal mapping, gloss mapping, splatting to reduce the tiled look in grass and dirt textures -- all stuff that has been commonplace for more than a decade). When you combine this with the third-party libraries that I've integrated for ocean and sky rendering, the graphics look quite a bit nicer than they once did. But they still look horrendously out-dated. 

 

I thought I had them convinced, at one point, that we really needed to change things. They gave me the go-ahead to re-architect the visual software from the ground-up so that it would be more flexible. The old visual software was so static; it was full of hard-coded behavior and ad-hoc hacks, and adding new stuff to it was very cumbersome. So, I took several months to reformulate things, and we just shipped our first project on the new architecture. Yay! I'm ready to add some new awesome effects.

 

But now they are loading my plate with more menial tasks that, at this point, I feel like would be better-handled by a junior programmer under my direction. We still have a long way to go on the graphics front. I haven't even been able to sell them on the importance of HDR yet, for example. We're still using simple single-buffer shadow mapping, and so we don't have full-scene shadows. I try to stay abreast of new developments, and I keep reading about things that I really want to do -- tiled light culling for nighttime simulations with lots of headlights and other work lights, image-based reflections to make the rain effects look more realistic, etc. -- that I think have practical value for the company, but I'm having a tough time selling them on it.

 

I really do understand, to some extent. The items they are having me work on are things that the customers are asking for, and there really isn't anyone else in the company who work in this area. However, I don't know if this is working for me anymore. I need a steep learning curve that I can climb. I feel like I'm on a plateau.

 

So I know what you're probably thinking. "Why not work on these projects in your own time, and then present them to the company when you have a working demo?"

 

And the truth is, I do work on side-projects such as this. However, it is extremely slow going because I am also in school. You may remember from the beginning of this tome that I did not have a degree when I started. Well, I started school about two and a half years ago, and I'm now about halfway toward a bachelor's degree in physics.* I am going full time, and the courses aren't easy. In order to maintain a good GPA (currently 3.93), I easily spend 30-40 hours per week on school. This is in addition to work, which often demands 50- or 60-hour weeks during crunch times. Yes, I have some weeks where I spend 90+ hours on work and school (although 70 is far more frequent).

 

I also have a family, and so I find myself with precious little time for side projects. I feel like I'm in one of those "Pick Two" situations: work, school, side-projects.

 

I'm really loath to quit school. I am just over halfway through, so why quit now? A degree might not be as important now as it was in the beginning of my career, but I'm not a quitter. Plus, I'm really excited about what I'm learning in my physics and math classes. I'm also currently working on some undergrad research involving crystals and electric field gradients, which I find really interesting and fun.

 

I am also loath to quit my job. I can't afford it, first of all. I also don't want the gap in my work history. Plus, I really like it where I work. These complaints aside, it's a great place to work, with nice people. They've been kind enough to take a chance on me, back when my graphics programming skills were unproven, and they have been very flexible with scheduling while I go to school. I feel that I owe them some loyalty.

 

But I also feel that, if I spend a year or two more in this "Graphics Programming Kiddie Pool", it's going to severely stunt my career. People are going to start wondering why I spent 6 years as a graphics programmer and haven't even implemented a good tone mapping operator before. 

 

What should I do?

 

 

* Why physics? I would probably learn a lot from a CS degree, but I thought something cross-disciplinary would be more fun. It's not as though graphics is completely without a basics in physics, and most gaming and simulation companies seem to value knowledge in physics. So, why not?


PARTNERS