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#ActualJeremy Williams

Posted 19 August 2013 - 06:16 AM

Very extensive work there, Jeremy.

 

But I think you misunderstood Cablefish a bit. It wasn't about copying some historical styles. I think he meant that you should study existing examples of alien races / human cultures that portray various aspects. Like how does one convey words like "arrogant", "noble", "pragmatic" audio-visually in general. Certain shades of colors or musical styles lead to certain assumptions by the viewer. I would have tried to answer in similar way myself, maybe we got your question wrong.

 

I'm fairly certain Cablefish didn't understand my intent, rather than me not understanding Cablefish's response. In hindsight, I probably could have worded my question better.

 

I personally find the alien races you've created a bit one-dimensional and extreme. Seems like you wanted to make all of them different from humans but they don't seem so different from each other? Cold and machine-like thinking lacking the softer side altogether.

 

No. While bahaar are unquestioningly obedient, they aren't cold or emotionless at all. They're like a dog, they jump right to master's orders without a second thought, but they do it because of their emotional attachment to their master. Simini are possibly the most emotionally-driven race present, save the andhieli which I didn't describe, which is implied by me saying they are arrogant and prone to tunnel vision. Arrogance is an irrational emotional construct, as is tunnel vision. Their extreme phobia of their ocean (and anything resembling it) is also an irrational emotional construct. The only "cold, emotionless" species would be the ferroningen, and it's an act. While ferroningen are amoral in nature, they are still emotional and simply seek to hide it and cover it up, usually holding them in until they explode. (Not literally, of course, although literal explosions may be involved if they go postal.)

 

On the other hand you didn't try to describe kokome in short summary of their ideals. Rather you write many chapters about how they have various kinds of x and y without extremities. Why is that?

 

Different context within the post.

 

Because I was starting to wonder if you can really make such a rule for the alien races consisting of billions of individuals? All kinds of humans exist and even small nations or counties aren't homogeneous in morale, social values and nature. Every day people fall victim to stereotypes and misconceptions so on the other hand I would like to see some sci-fi handle alien nations a bit more in-depth. Maybe that was your intention and it was just misrepresented due to the different motives in that post.

 

If I were to say, for instance, "men tend to be strong, women tend to be flexible", would that mean that the sexes were homogeneous in their physicality? Would it mean that men were always stronger than women, and women always more flexible then men? No. All it would mean was that men have greater strength then women on average, and women greater flexibility than men on average. Same concept here. If I say simini tend to be arrogant, does that mean all simini are? Or does it mean that, on average, simini tend to be more arrogant than the accepted baseline?

 

Well, good luck with your project anway. You've done lots of writing and you'll have immense amount of work ahead of you when you turn that novel into a game smile.png

 

"Novel?"

 

As for the game, I've got the concept up here in the game design section. It's also not the game I'm going to be working on first, it's just a creative exercise at the moment. I'm probably going to do it later on, as I don't like wasting good game ideas.


#2Jeremy Williams

Posted 19 August 2013 - 06:16 AM

Very extensive work there, Jeremy.

 

But I think you misunderstood Cablefish a bit. It wasn't about copying some historical styles. I think he meant that you should study existing examples of alien races / human cultures that portray various aspects. Like how does one convey words like "arrogant", "noble", "pragmatic" audio-visually in general. Certain shades of colors or musical styles lead to certain assumptions by the viewer. I would have tried to answer in similar way myself, maybe we got your question wrong.

 

In this context, I'm fairly certain Cablefish didn't understand my intent, rather than me not understanding Cablefish's response. In hindsight, I probably could have worded my question better.

 

I personally find the alien races you've created a bit one-dimensional and extreme. Seems like you wanted to make all of them different from humans but they don't seem so different from each other? Cold and machine-like thinking lacking the softer side altogether.

 

No. While bahaar are unquestioningly obedient, they aren't cold or emotionless at all. They're like a dog, they jump right to master's orders without a second thought, but they do it because of their emotional attachment to their master. Simini are possibly the most emotionally-driven race present, save the andhieli which I didn't describe, which is implied by me saying they are arrogant and prone to tunnel vision. Arrogance is an irrational emotional construct, as is tunnel vision. Their extreme phobia of their ocean (and anything resembling it) is also an irrational emotional construct. The only "cold, emotionless" species would be the ferroningen, and it's an act. While ferroningen are amoral in nature, they are still emotional and simply seek to hide it and cover it up, usually holding them in until they explode. (Not literally, of course, although literal explosions may be involved if they go postal.)

 

On the other hand you didn't try to describe kokome in short summary of their ideals. Rather you write many chapters about how they have various kinds of x and y without extremities. Why is that?

 

Different context within the post.

 

Because I was starting to wonder if you can really make such a rule for the alien races consisting of billions of individuals? All kinds of humans exist and even small nations or counties aren't homogeneous in morale, social values and nature. Every day people fall victim to stereotypes and misconceptions so on the other hand I would like to see some sci-fi handle alien nations a bit more in-depth. Maybe that was your intention and it was just misrepresented due to the different motives in that post.

 

If I were to say, for instance, "men tend to be strong, women tend to be flexible", would that mean that the sexes were homogeneous in their physicality? Would it mean that men were always stronger than women, and women always more flexible then men? No. All it would mean was that men have greater strength then women on average, and women greater flexibility than men on average. Same concept here. If I say simini tend to be arrogant, does that mean all simini are? Or does it mean that, on average, simini tend to be more arrogant than the accepted baseline?

 

Well, good luck with your project anway. You've done lots of writing and you'll have immense amount of work ahead of you when you turn that novel into a game smile.png

 

"Novel?"

 

As for the game, I've got the concept up here in the game design section. It's also not the game I'm going to be working on first, it's just a creative exercise at the moment. I'm probably going to do it later on, as I don't like wasting good game ideas.


#1Jeremy Williams

Posted 19 August 2013 - 06:15 AM

Very extensive work there, Jeremy.

 

But I think you misunderstood Cablefish a bit. It wasn't about copying some historical styles. I think he meant that you should study existing examples of alien races / human cultures that portray various aspects. Like how does one convey words like "arrogant", "noble", "pragmatic" audio-visually in general. Certain shades of colors or musical styles lead to certain assumptions by the viewer. I would have tried to answer in similar way myself, maybe we got your question wrong.

 

In this context, I'm fairly certain Cablefish didn't understand my intent, rather than me not understanding Cablefish's response. In hindsight, I probably could have worded my question better.

 

 

 

I personally find the alien races you've created a bit one-dimensional and extreme. Seems like you wanted to make all of them different from humans but they don't seem so different from each other? Cold and machine-like thinking lacking the softer side altogether.

 

No. While bahaar are unquestioningly obedient, they aren't cold or emotionless at all. They're like a dog, they jump right to master's orders without a second thought, but they do it because of their emotional attachment to their master. Simini are possibly the most emotionally-driven race present, save the andhieli which I didn't describe, which is implied by me saying they are arrogant and prone to tunnel vision. Arrogance is an irrational emotional construct, as is tunnel vision. Their extreme phobia of their ocean (and anything resembling it) is also an irrational emotional construct. The only "cold, emotionless" species would be the ferroningen, and it's an act. While ferroningen are amoral in nature, they are still emotional and simply seek to hide it and cover it up, usually holding them in until they explode. (Not literally, of course, although literal explosions may be involved if they go postal.)

 

 

 

On the other hand you didn't try to describe kokome in short summary of their ideals. Rather you write many chapters about how they have various kinds of x and y without extremities. Why is that?

 

Different context within the post.

 

 

 

Because I was starting to wonder if you can really make such a rule for the alien races consisting of billions of individuals? All kinds of humans exist and even small nations or counties aren't homogeneous in morale, social values and nature. Every day people fall victim to stereotypes and misconceptions so on the other hand I would like to see some sci-fi handle alien nations a bit more in-depth. Maybe that was your intention and it was just misrepresented due to the different motives in that post.

 

If I were to say, for instance, "men tend to be strong, women tend to be flexible", would that mean that the sexes were homogeneous in their physicality? Would it mean that men were always stronger than women, and women always more flexible then men? No. All it would mean was that men have greater strength then women on average, and women greater flexibility than men on average. Same concept here. If I say simini tend to be arrogant, does that mean all simini are? Or does it mean that, on average, simini tend to be more arrogant than the accepted baseline?

 

 

 

Well, good luck with your project anway. You've done lots of writing and you'll have immense amount of work ahead of you when you turn that novel into a game smile.png

 

"Novel?"

 

As for the game, I've got the concept up here in the game design section. It's also not the game I'm going to be working on first, it's just a creative exercise at the moment.


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