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#Actualzachprinz

Posted 20 August 2013 - 01:51 AM

Wow.  It looks like REALLY IS a game design class that covers some aspects of design.  Usually they are programming classes that get called design. Reading it over, it the course looks like it is about 1/3 design, 1/2 programming, and a little bit of other business tasks for the rest... but that's better than normal.

 

If you are interested in the course, take it.  Take courses because they expand your knowledge and expose you to new ideas, or take the course because it makes you a better human being.

 

Their courses are an interesting mix. A bit of industry history, a bit of animation exposure, a bit of programming exposure, a bit of music, a bit of film, for an arts degree. While much better than most "game design" courses, I'm still not entirely sure what major studio would hire such a graduate as an entry-level designer.

 

Tom has an excellent collection of articles focused on designers that I suggest you read if you haven't already. Note something that his advice frequently repeats: Game designer is not an entry level position.  You need to get into the industry doing something else.  The most reliable entry methods to the game industry are as a programmer, modeler, animator, or artist. Less reliable are QA and business support roles. Almost completely unreliable paths are production, audio, and design: you can try to break in with them, and a small number of people have done it, but your odds are better choosing things like being a career gambler.

 

Yeah, I'm majoring in computer science. I'm taking this course because I would like to work making games. My courses will be literally 100% computer science (+ some animation.) If I chose that path.  However I appreciate you're comment pertaining to what you got from the syllabus, that made me feel more confident that I will get something out of this. 

 

Game design?

 

Cool!

 

Who's teaching it?

 

Sid Meier?

 

Will Wright?

 

or some guy we've never heard of?

 

think about it....

 

BTW, you'd be so jealous....

 

i got to attend Abrash's lecture on building the Quake engine at CGDC 96.

 

now THAT'S the kind of lecture you want to attend.

 

[edit]

 

you know the old saying:

 

"them that can, do.  them that can't, teach.  them that can't teach, administrate."

 

I respect that opinion and I find myself thinking that these people are just trying to teach me how to emulate what other, innovative people have done. But the education can't hurt if for nothing else than to broaden my view of games.

 

@newVoxel, (I can't add another multiquote and it's like 4 so I am not going to try) I've always heard software engineering is more of a business side to computer science. I love teaching myself stuff. I've literally taught myself everything I know, and I'd like to think I'm a fairly capable programmer. But I really hope you're incorrect on the points you make. As nerdy as it sounds I'm actually looking forward to learning in college.

 

I think I'm going to add the course. Like cornstalks pointed out I could always drop it after I see what it's like.


#3zachprinz

Posted 20 August 2013 - 01:50 AM

Wow.  It looks like REALLY IS a game design class that covers some aspects of design.  Usually they are programming classes that get called design. Reading it over, it the course looks like it is about 1/3 design, 1/2 programming, and a little bit of other business tasks for the rest... but that's better than normal.

 

If you are interested in the course, take it.  Take courses because they expand your knowledge and expose you to new ideas, or take the course because it makes you a better human being.

 

Their courses are an interesting mix. A bit of industry history, a bit of animation exposure, a bit of programming exposure, a bit of music, a bit of film, for an arts degree. While much better than most "game design" courses, I'm still not entirely sure what major studio would hire such a graduate as an entry-level designer.

 

Tom has an excellent collection of articles focused on designers that I suggest you read if you haven't already. Note something that his advice frequently repeats: Game designer is not an entry level position.  You need to get into the industry doing something else.  The most reliable entry methods to the game industry are as a programmer, modeler, animator, or artist. Less reliable are QA and business support roles. Almost completely unreliable paths are production, audio, and design: you can try to break in with them, and a small number of people have done it, but your odds are better choosing things like being a career gambler.

 

Yeah, I'm majoring in computer science. I'm taking this course because I would like to work making games. My courses will be literally 100% computer science (+ some animation.) If I chose that path.  However I appreciate you're comment pertaining to what you got from the syllabus, that made me feel more confident that I will get something out of this. 

 

Game design?

 

Cool!

 

Who's teaching it?

 

Sid Meier?

 

Will Wright?

 

or some guy we've never heard of?

 

think about it....

 

BTW, you'd be so jealous....

 

i got to attend Abrash's lecture on building the Quake engine at CGDC 96.

 

now THAT'S the kind of lecture you want to attend.

 

[edit]

 

you know the old saying:

 

"them that can, do.  them that can't, teach.  them that can't teach, administrate."

 

I respect that opinion and I find myself thinking that these people are just trying to teach me how to emulate what other, innovative people have done. But the education can't hurt if for nothing else than to broaden my view of games.

 

@newVoxel, (I can't add another multiquote and it's like 4 so I am not going to try) I've always heard software engineering is more of a business side to computer science. I love teaching myself stuff. I've literally taught myself everything I know, and I'd like to think I'm a fairly capable programmer. But I really hope you're incorrect on the points you make. As nerdy as it sounds I'm actually looking forward to learning in college.

 

I think I'm going to add the course. Like cornstalks pointed out I could always drop it after I see what it's like if I hate it.


#2zachprinz

Posted 20 August 2013 - 01:48 AM

Wow.  It looks like REALLY IS a game design class that covers some aspects of design.  Usually they are programming classes that get called design. Reading it over, it the course looks like it is about 1/3 design, 1/2 programming, and a little bit of other business tasks for the rest... but that's better than normal.

 

If you are interested in the course, take it.  Take courses because they expand your knowledge and expose you to new ideas, or take the course because it makes you a better human being.

 

Their courses are an interesting mix. A bit of industry history, a bit of animation exposure, a bit of programming exposure, a bit of music, a bit of film, for an arts degree. While much better than most "game design" courses, I'm still not entirely sure what major studio would hire such a graduate as an entry-level designer.

 

Tom has an excellent collection of articles focused on designers that I suggest you read if you haven't already. Note something that his advice frequently repeats: Game designer is not an entry level position.  You need to get into the industry doing something else.  The most reliable entry methods to the game industry are as a programmer, modeler, animator, or artist. Less reliable are QA and business support roles. Almost completely unreliable paths are production, audio, and design: you can try to break in with them, and a small number of people have done it, but your odds are better choosing things like being a career gambler.

 

Yeah, I'm majoring in computer science. I'm taking this course because I would like to work making games. My courses will be literally 100% computer science (+ some animation.) If I chose that path.  However I appreciate you're comment pertaining to what you got from the syllabus, that made me feel more confident that I will get something out of this. 

 

Game design?

 

Cool!

 

Who's teaching it?

 

Sid Meier?

 

Will Wright?

 

or some guy we've never heard of?

 

think about it....

 

BTW, you'd be so jealous....

 

i got to attend Abrash's lecture on building the Quake engine at CGDC 96.

 

now THAT'S the kind of lecture you want to attend.

 

[edit]

 

you know the old saying:

 

"them that can, do.  them that can't, teach.  them that can't teach, administrate."

 

I respect that opinion and I find myself thinking that these people are just trying to teach me how to emulate what other, innovative people have done. But the education can't hurt if for nothing else than to broaden my view of games.

 

@newVoxel, (I can't add another multiquote and it's like 4 so I am not going to try) I've always heard software engineering is more of a business side to computer science. I love teaching myself stuff. I've literally taught myself everything I know, and I'd like to think I'm a fairly capable programmer. But I really hope you're incorrect on the points you make. As nerdy as it sounds I'm actually looking forward to learning in college.

 

I think I'm going to add the course. 


#1zachprinz

Posted 20 August 2013 - 01:48 AM

Wow.  It looks like REALLY IS a game design class that covers some aspects of design.  Usually they are programming classes that get called design. Reading it over, it the course looks like it is about 1/3 design, 1/2 programming, and a little bit of other business tasks for the rest... but that's better than normal.

 

If you are interested in the course, take it.  Take courses because they expand your knowledge and expose you to new ideas, or take the course because it makes you a better human being.

 

Their courses are an interesting mix. A bit of industry history, a bit of animation exposure, a bit of programming exposure, a bit of music, a bit of film, for an arts degree. While much better than most "game design" courses, I'm still not entirely sure what major studio would hire such a graduate as an entry-level designer.

 

Tom has an excellent collection of articles focused on designers that I suggest you read if you haven't already. Note something that his advice frequently repeats: Game designer is not an entry level position.  You need to get into the industry doing something else.  The most reliable entry methods to the game industry are as a programmer, modeler, animator, or artist. Less reliable are QA and business support roles. Almost completely unreliable paths are production, audio, and design: you can try to break in with them, and a small number of people have done it, but your odds are better choosing things like being a career gambler.

 

Yeah, I'm majoring in computer science. I'm taking this course because I would like to work making games. My courses will be literally 100% computer science (+ some animation.) If I chose that path.  However I appreciate you're comment pertaining to what you got from the syllabus, that made me feel more confident that I will get something out of this. 

 

Game design?

 

Cool!

 

Who's teaching it?

 

Sid Meier?

 

Will Wright?

 

or some guy we've never heard of?

 

think about it....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BTW, you'd be so jealous....

 

i got to attend Abrash's lecture on building the Quake engine at CGDC 96.

 

now THAT'S the kind of lecture you want to attend.

 

 

[edit]

 

you know the old saying:

 

"them that can, do.  them that can't, teach.  them that can't teach, administrate."

 

I respect that opinion and I find myself thinking that these people are just trying to teach me how to emulate what other, innovative people have done. But the education can't hurt if for nothing else than to broaden my view of games.

 

@newVoxel, (I can't add another multiquote and it's like 4 so I am not going to try) I've always heard software engineering is more of a business side to computer science. I love teaching myself stuff. I've literally taught myself everything I know, and I'd like to think I'm a fairly capable programmer. But I really hope you're incorrect on the points you make. As nerdy as it sounds I'm actually looking forward to learning in college.

 

I think I'm going to add the course. 


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