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#ActualMalabyte

Posted 25 August 2013 - 04:49 PM

    Go and check out GameSalad or RPGMaker for some basic stuff, else I think Unity sounds like a good, solid start. I have minimal Unity background, but Unity is what keeps popping up when I look around the internet atm. But there's tons of engines out there that you can utilize (just pick the one that sounds best for you, after some hours of research):

 

    http://www.moddb.com/engines/top

 

 

    I only have some general advice, really:

 

    The reason why people tell you to start small is mainly because you're 1 person. You need to start small, because that's how you actually manage to finish a project. You can't imagine the Pandora's Box of bugs, glitches and hours of frustration you'll unlock if you start with a project too big, and this is demonstrable one of the biggest reasons why people fail at game development. The clue here isn't really just to know programming. The big secret to beginning as a game developer is to actually make stuff and have a portfolio to show off to someone.

 

    Also, real professionals try not to judge a book by its cover, they look for the actual experience. You might have ludicrously bad textures in your game, but they may still be interested because it's a simple matter of hiring a visual designer to make better textures later. Or similar.

 

 

    Here's a video for you:

http://youtu.be/bgwG-VBKStU

 

 

    Notice how the guys in that video all say the same thing: -- Make mods, create something, anything. -- Get a portfolio, but don't start massive undertakings that typically require either years of experience, the muscle memory and twitch to type 2000 lines of code per session, and/or a big team that coordinates their individual efforts.

 

    Start small. Seriously. I'm not joking. Make a mod for Skyrim or Minecraft, get some sprite sheets made, sound, 3D models, anything. Maybe you rather want to build your own Tetris game, Super Mario, anything that you could do in a reasonable amount of time with minimal debugging. Utilize your strengths, not your weaknesses (unless you want to make them into strengths, as an investment).

 

    My own project now is to just get through the Game Programming tutorial series of TheCherno on Youtube, then start making something of my own in Java. I've already dabbled a little in Elder Scrolls modding, Fallout 3 and similar, but right now I'm learning Java and I'm having lots of fun just learning stuff - not only Java and Eclipse, but XHTML, Javascript, HTML5, making sprites in Paint.NET and just having fun with studying games on the side. This is my current stance atm, but it's not exactly something that anyone would want to hire me for. That's why my first major step after this one, is to build my website and some basic portfolio.

 

    But whatever you do: Start. Small. Seriously! wink.png


#8Malabyte

Posted 25 August 2013 - 04:48 PM

    Go and check out GameSalad or RPGMaker for some basic stuff, else I think Unity sounds like a good start, according to some. There's tons of engines out there that you can utilize here (just pick the one that sounds best for you, after some hours of research):

 

    http://www.moddb.com/engines/top

 

 

    I only have some general advice, really:

 

    The reason why people tell you to start small is mainly because you're 1 person. You need to start small, because that's how you actually manage to finish a project. You can't imagine the Pandora's Box of bugs, glitches and hours of frustration you'll unlock if you start with a project too big, and this is demonstrable one of the biggest reasons why people fail at game development. The clue here isn't really just to know programming. The big secret to beginning as a game developer is to actually make stuff and have a portfolio to show off to someone.

 

    Also, real professionals try not to judge a book by its cover, they look for the actual experience. You might have ludicrously bad textures in your game, but they may still be interested because it's a simple matter of hiring a visual designer to make better textures later. Or similar.

 

 

    Here's a video for you:

http://youtu.be/bgwG-VBKStU

 

 

    Notice how the guys in that video all say the same thing: -- Make mods, create something, anything. -- Get a portfolio, but don't start massive undertakings that typically require either years of experience, the muscle memory and twitch to type 2000 lines of code per session, and/or a big team that coordinates their individual efforts.

 

    Start small. Seriously. I'm not joking. Make a mod for Skyrim or Minecraft, get some sprite sheets made, sound, 3D models, anything. Maybe you rather want to build your own Tetris game, Super Mario, anything that you could do in a reasonable amount of time with minimal debugging. Utilize your strengths, not your weaknesses (unless you want to make them into strengths, as an investment).

 

    My own project now is to just get through the Game Programming tutorial series of TheCherno on Youtube, then start making something of my own in Java. I've already dabbled a little in Elder Scrolls modding, Fallout 3 and similar, but right now I'm learning Java and I'm having lots of fun just learning stuff - not only Java and Eclipse, but XHTML, Javascript, HTML5, making sprites in Paint.NET and just having fun with studying games on the side. This is my current stance atm, but it's not exactly something that anyone would want to hire me for. That's why my first major step after this one, is to build my website and some basic portfolio.

 

    But whatever you do: Start. Small. Seriously! wink.png


#7Malabyte

Posted 25 August 2013 - 03:33 PM

    Well, I only have some general advice, really:

 

    The reason why people tell you to start small is mainly because you're 1 person. You need to start small, because that's how you actually manage to finish a project. You can't imagine the Pandora's Box of bugs, glitches and hours of frustration you'll unlock if you start with a project too big, and this is demonstrable one of the biggest reasons why people fail at game development. The clue here isn't really just to know programming. The big secret to beginning as a game developer is to actually make stuff and have a portfolio to show off to someone.

 

    Also, real professionals try not to judge a book by its cover, they look for the actual experience. You might have ludicrously bad textures in your game, but they may still be interested because it's a simple matter of hiring a visual designer to make better textures later. Or similar.

 

 

    Here's a video for you:

http://youtu.be/bgwG-VBKStU

 

 

    Notice how the guys in that video all say the same thing: -- Make mods, create something, anything. -- Get a portfolio, but don't start massive undertakings that typically require either years of experience, the muscle memory and twitch to type 2000 lines of code per session, and/or a big team that coordinates their individual efforts.

 

    Start small. Seriously. I'm not joking. Make a mod for Skyrim or Minecraft, get some sprite sheets made, sound, 3D models, anything. Maybe you rather want to build your own Tetris game, Super Mario, anything that you could do in a reasonable amount of time with minimal debugging. Utilize your strengths, not your weaknesses (unless you want to make them into strengths, as an investment).

 

    My own project now is to just get through the Game Programming tutorial series of TheCherno on Youtube, then start making something of my own in Java. I've already dabbled a little in Elder Scrolls modding, Fallout 3 and similar, but right now I'm learning Java and I'm having lots of fun just learning stuff - not only Java and Eclipse, but XHTML, Javascript, HTML5, making sprites in Paint.NET and just having fun with studying games on the side. This is my current stance atm, but it's not exactly something that anyone would want to hire me for. That's why my first major step after this one, is to build my website and some basic portfolio.

 

    But whatever you do: Start. Small. Seriously! wink.png


#6Malabyte

Posted 25 August 2013 - 03:32 PM

    Well, I only have some general advice, really:

 

    The reason why people tell you to start small is mainly because you're 1 person. You need to start small, because that's how you actually manage to finish a project. You can't imagine the Pandora's Box of bugs, glitches and hours of frustration you'll unlock if you start with a project too big, and this is demonstrable one of the biggest reasons why people fail at game development. The clue here isn't really just to know programming. The big secret to beginning as a game developer is to actually make stuff and have a portfolio to show off to someone.

 

    Also, real professionals try not to judge a book by its cover, they look for the actual experience. You might have ludicrously bad textures in your game, but they may still be interested because it's a simple matter of hiring a visual designer to make better textures later. Or similar.

 

 

    Here's a video for you:
 

http://youtu.be/bgwG-VBKStU

 

 

    Notice how the guys in that video all say the same thing: -- Make mods, create something, anything. -- Get a portfolio, but don't start massive undertakings that typically require either years of experience, the muscle memory and twitch to type 2000 lines of code per session, and/or a big team that coordinates their individual efforts.

 

    Start small. Seriously. I'm not joking. Make a mod for Skyrim or Minecraft, get some sprite sheets made, sound, 3D models, anything. Maybe you rather want to build your own Tetris game, Super Mario, anything that you could do in a reasonable amount of time with minimal debugging. Utilize your strengths, not your weaknesses (unless you want to make them into strengths, as an investment).

 

    My own project now is to just get through the Game Programming tutorial series of TheCherno on Youtube, then start making something of my own in Java. I've already dabbled a little in Elder Scrolls modding, Fallout 3 and similar, but right now I'm learning Java and I'm having lots of fun just learning stuff - not only Java and Eclipse, but XHTML, Javascript, HTML5, making sprites in Paint.NET and just having fun with studying games on the side. This is my current stance atm, but it's not exactly something that anyone would want to hire me for. That's why my first major step after this one, is to build my website and some basic portfolio.

 

    But whatever you do: Start. Small. Seriously! wink.png


#5Malabyte

Posted 25 August 2013 - 03:31 PM

    Well, I only have some general advice, really:

 

    The reason why people tell you to start small is mainly because you're 1 person. You need to start small, because that's how you actually manage to finish a project. You can't imagine the Pandora's Box of bugs, glitches and hours of frustration you'll unlock if you start with a project too big, and this is demonstrable one of the biggest reasons why people fail at game development. The clue here isn't really just to know programming. The big secret to beginning as a game developer is to actually make stuff and have a portfolio to show off to someone.

 

    Also, real professionals try not to judge a book by its cover, they look for the actual experience. You might have ludicrously bad textures in your game, but they may still be interested because it's a simple matter of hiring a visual designer to make better textures later. Or similar.

 

 

    Here's a video for you:
 

http://youtu.be/bgwG-VBKStU

 

 

    Notice how the guys in that video all say the same thing: -- Make mods, create something, anything. -- Get a portfolio, but don't start massive undertakings that typically require either years of experience, the muscle memory and twitch to type 2000 lines of code per session, and/or a big team that coordinates their individual efforts.

 

    Start small. Seriously. I'm not joking. Make a mod for Skyrim or Minecraft, get some sprite sheets made, sound, 3D models, anything. Maybe you rather want to build your own Tetris game, Super Mario, anything that you could do in a reasonable amount of time with minimal debugging. Utilize your strengths, not your weaknesses (unless you want to make them into strengths, as an investment).

 

    My own project now is to just get through the Game Programming tutorial series of TheCherno on Youtube, then start making something of my own in Java. I've already dabbled a little in Elder Scrolls modding, Fallout 3 and similar, but right now I'm learning Java and I'm having lots of fun just learning stuff - not only Java and Eclipse, but XHTML, Javascript, HTML5, making sprites in Paint.NET and just having fun with studying games on the side. This is my current stance atm, but it's not exactly something that anyone would want to hire me for. That's why my first major step after this one, is to build my website and some basic portfolio.

 

    But whatever you do: Start. Small. Seriously! wink.png


#4Malabyte

Posted 25 August 2013 - 03:27 PM

    Well, I only have some general advice, really:

 

    The reason why people tell you to start small is mainly because you're 1 person. You need to start small, because that's how you actually manage to finish a project. You can't imagine the Pandora's Box of bugs, glitches and hours of frustration you'll unlock if you start with a project too big, and this is demonstrable one of the biggest reasons why people fail at game development. The clue here isn't really just to know programming. The big secret to beginning as a game developer is to actually make stuff and have a portfolio to show off to someone.

 

    Also, real professionals try not to judge a book by its cover, they look for the actual experience. You might have ludicrously bad textures in your game, but they may still be interested because it's a simple matter of hiring a visual designer to make better textures later. Or similar.

 

 

    Here's a video for you:
 

http://youtu.be/bgwG-VBKStU

 

 

    Notice how the guys in that video all say the same thing: -- Make mods, create something, anything. -- Get a portfolio, but don't start massive undertakings that typically require either years of experience, the muscle memory to type 2000 lines of code per session, and/or a big team that coordinates their individual efforts.

 

    Start small. Seriously. I'm not joking. Make a mod for Skyrim or Minecraft, get some sprite sheets made, sound, 3D models, anything. Maybe you rather want to build your own Tetris game, Super Mario, anything that you could do in a reasonable amount of time with minimal debugging. Utilize your strengths, not your weaknesses (unless you want to make them into strengths, as an investment).

 

    My own project now is to just get through the Game Programming tutorial series of TheCherno on Youtube, then start making something of my own in Java. I've already dabbled a little in Elder Scrolls modding, Fallout 3 and similar, but right now I'm learning Java and I'm having lots of fun just learning stuff - not only Java and Eclipse, but XHTML, Javascript, HTML5, making sprites in Paint.NET and just having fun with studying games on the side. This is my current stance atm, but it's not exactly something that anyone would want to hire me for. That's why my first major step after this one, is to build my website and some basic portfolio.

 

    But whatever you do: Start. Small. Seriously! wink.png


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