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#ActualNorman Barrows

Posted 29 August 2013 - 04:38 AM


I think you should start writing something if you haven't already.
 
well, lets see, i've done let's say a dozen, probably more, published games over the years. i'm guessing here. its like girls i've dated. each time i try to remember them all, i remember one i forgot the previous time i tried to remember them all!  <g>.
 
i got back into game development seriously for the 4th time about Jan 2012. since then, i've gotten a RTT game to alpha, a FPS/RPG to beta, and early prototypes of a flight sim, a city builder, and a RISK - type turn based strategy game going. I've also done  the de-regeur low level library for audio, graphics, timers, etc already.     
 
recently i did a generic "entities list" library, sort of as an experiment - searching for patterns for use in games.  soon after, i re-designed it, and added a basic "game engine" framework. In parallel with this work on the entity list and game engine code, i've been revisiting the topic of using traditional c++/oo for games.  I actually used to make and sell game development libraries and tools, and have been considering  perhaps releasing some of Rockland's in-house libraries or writing some articles or journal entries, but most folks would probably want to see them with a c++ api.   i've been a fulltime indie since before C++ was invented. when it came along, it didn't offer that much for the single developer working on a single game project.  its was mostly about reuse of code in enterprise level development with large teams, etc (which AAA game development has practically become these days).   recently i thought i might give it another look-see.  however, despite it having been around for years now, there doesn't appear to be much consensus on how to write a game in c++.    i would have thought that by now someone would have figured it out, given the popularity of both C++/OO and computer games compared to back then.  
 
the most recent thing i wrote was tonight. i took the combo game engine / entities list module, and made a new version that can be used as a stand alone library, without requiring any user defined callbacks, like the game engine version has. then i used this new version to rapid prototype a runtime module for a high level p-code game programming language virtual machine.  then i wrote a little 40 byte program in the language's virtual machine code that starts directx, loads all graphics and audio content, then goes into a loop where it clears the screen, displays the name of the programming language, displays the framerate, and checks for ESC being pressed. when ESC is pressed, it shuts down directx and quits. 
 
so as you can see, recently I've been playing around with game architecture, game library, game engine, and game module design a bit - and now, dedicated game programming languages too.

#2Norman Barrows

Posted 29 August 2013 - 04:27 AM


I think you should start writing something if you haven't already.
 
well, lets see, i've done let's say a dozen, probably more, published games over the years. i'm guessing here. its like girls i've dated. each time i try to remember them all, i remember one i forgot the previous time i tried to remember them all!  <g>.
 
i got back into game development seriously for the 4th time about Jan 2012. since then, i've gotten a RTT game to alpha, a FPS/RPG to beta, and early prototypes of a flight sim, a city builder, and a RISK - type turn based strategy game going. I've also done  the de-regeur low level library for audio, graphics, timers, etc already.     
 
recently i did a generic "entities list" library, sort of as an experiment - searching for patterns for use in games.  soon after, i re-designed it, and added a basic "game engine" framework. In parallel with this work on the entity list and game engine code, i've been revisiting the topic of using traditional c++/oo for games.  I actually used to make and sell game development libraries and tools, and have been considering  perhaps releasing some of Rockland's in-house libraries or writing some articles or journal entries, but most folks would probably want to see them with a c++ api.   i've been a fulltime indie since before C++ was invented. when it came along, it didn't offer that much for the single developer working on a single game project.  its was mostly about reuse of code in enterprise level development with large teams, etc (which AAA game development has practically become these days).   recently i thought i might give it another look-see.  however, despite it having been around for years now, there doesn't appear to be much consensus on how to write a game in c++.    i would have thought that by now someone would have figured it out, given the popularity of both C++/OO and computer games compared to back then.  
 
the most recent thing i wrote was tonight. i took the combo game engine / entities list module, and made a new version that can be used as a stand alone library, without requiring any user defined callbacks, like the game engine version has. then i used this new version to rapid prototype a runtime module for a high level p-code game programming language virtual machine.  then i wrote a little 40 byte program in the language's virtual machine code that starts directx, loads all graphics and audio content, then goes into a loop where it clears the screen, displays the name of the programming language, displays the framerate, and checks for ESC being pressed. when ESC is pressed, it shuts down directx and quits. 
 
so as you can see, recently i've been playing around with game arctitecture, game library, game engine, and game module design a bit.  

#1Norman Barrows

Posted 29 August 2013 - 04:23 AM


I think you should start writing something if you haven't already.
 
well, lets see, i've done let's say a dozen, probably more, published games over the years. i'm guessing here. its like girls i've dated. each time i try to remember them all, i remember one i forgot the previous time i tried to remember them all!  <g>.
 
i got back into game development seriously for the 4th time about Jan 2012. since then, i've gotten a RTT game to alpha, a FPS/RPG to beta, and early prototypes of a flight sim, a city builder, and a RISK - type turn based strategy game going. I've also done  the de-regeur low level library for audio, graphics, timers, etc already.     
 
recently i did a generic "entities list" library, sort of as an experiment - searching for patterns for use in games.  soon after, i re-designed it, and added a basic "game engine" framework. In parallel with this work on the entity list and game engine code, i've been revisiting the topic of using traditional c++/oo for games.  I actually used to make and sell game development libraries and tools, and have been considering  perhaps releasing some of Rockland's in-house libraries or writing some articles or journal entries, but most folks would probably want to see them with a c++ api.   i've been a fulltime indie since before C++ was invented. when it came along, it didn't offer that much for the single developer working on a single game project.  its was mostly about reuse of code in enterprise level development with large teams, etc (which AAA game development has practically become these days).   recently i thought i might give it another look-see.  however, despite it having been around for years now, there doesn't appear to be much consensus on how to write a game in c++.    i would have thought that by now someone would have figured it out, given the popularity of both C++/OO and computer games compared to back then.  
 
the most recent thing i wrote was tonight. i took the combo game engine / entities list module, and made a new version that can be used as a stand alone library, without requiring any user defined callbacks, like the game engine version has. then i used this new version to rapid prototype a runtime module for a high level p-code game programming language virtual machine.  then i wrote a little 40 byte program in the language's virtaul machine code that starts directx, loads all graphics and audio content, then goes into a loop where it clears the screen, displays the name of the programming language, displays the framerate, and checks for ESC being pressed. when ESC is pressed, it shuts down directx and quits. 
 
so as you can see, recently i've been playing around with game arctitecture, game library, game engine, and game module design a bit.  

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