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#ActualRavyne

Posted 06 September 2013 - 03:30 PM

Not really. Strictly speaking, I suppose non-uniform-scaling isn't common in processing things like geometry, but it certainly has a meaning that's rational enough to be useful, and vectors and vector spaces have other applications. For example, if you consider a color space (like RGB), as a vector space, then operations like gamma-correction are just non-uniform scales. We can argue mathematical pedantries all day but when we're being pragmatic there's not a strong argument to be made for keeping to a 100% correct, mathematical definition of vectors intact (unless you're specifically working in a pure-math domain, and want the type system to chain you to the mathematical definition intentionally). For example, even though vectors and points are entirely different mathematical concepts, they can be represented in unified form, and often are, without making any dangerous compromises.


#1Ravyne

Posted 06 September 2013 - 03:29 PM

Not really. Strictly speaking, I suppose non-uniform-scaling doesn't isn't common in processing things like geometry, but it certainly has a meaning that's rational enough to be useful, and vectors and vector spaces have other applications. For example, if you consider a color space (like RGB), as a vector space, then operations like gamma-correction are just non-uniform scales. We can argue mathematical pedantries all day but when we're being pragmatic there's not a strong argument to be made for keeping to a 100% correct, mathematical definition of vectors intact (unless you're specifically working in a pure-math domain, and want the type system to chain you to the mathematical definition intentionally). For example, even though vectors and points are entirely different mathematical concepts, they can be represented in unified form, and often are, without making any dangerous compromises.


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