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#ActualGeometrian

Posted 07 September 2013 - 02:51 PM

I was in exactly the same boat--I knew how to program, and had great experience with multiple programming languages--especially Python and C++. Not only this, I had reverse engineered many graphics algorithms (I had implemented, for example, a GPU cloth simulation based on GLSL and FBOs before I ever even applied anywhere).
 
Basically, I didn't take any of the introductory classes, and I started immediately on higher level coursework (I took, for example, the graduate course in graphics algorithms my first semester). Especially at a big university, there's always more to learn about your field. I quickly learned about functional programming languages, asymptotic analysis, and design patterns. I was constantly learning things, and I eventually realized I wanted to double major in abstract mathematics just to get the most out of my future coursework.
 
The point is, universities will teach you. That's kindof what they do. As others have mentioned, a CS degree is not just about programming--if that's all you can do, you're a software engineer, not a computer scientist. And there's a huge difference.
 
Plus, being at a university is wonderful in its own right. Basically everyone has a triple digit IQ (which for me was a refreshing change from high school) and by and large you can learn whatever you want. There's almost always core requirements, but you have much much much more leeway in choosing.


#1Geometrian

Posted 07 September 2013 - 02:50 PM

I was in exactly the same boat--I knew how to program, and had great experience with multiple programming languages--especially Python and C++. Not only this, I had reverse engineered many graphics algorithms (I had implemented a GPU cloth simulation based on GLSL and FBOs before I ever even applied anywhere).
 
Basically, I didn't take any of the introductory classes, and I started on higher level coursework (I took, for example, the graduate course in graphics algorithms my first semester). Especially at a big university, there's always more to learn about your field. I quickly learned about functional programming languages, asymptotic analysis, and design patterns. I was constantly learning things, and I eventually realized I wanted to double major in abstract mathematics just to get the most out of my future coursework.
 
The point is, universities will teach you. That's kindof what they do. As others have mentioned, a CS degree is not just about programming--if that's all you can do, you're a software engineer, not a computer scientist. And there's a huge difference.
 
Plus, being at a university is wonderful in its own right. Basically everyone has a triple digit IQ (which for me was a refreshing change from high school) and by and large you can learn whatever you want. There's almost always core requirements, but you have much much much more leeway in choosing.


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