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#ActualTheChubu

Posted 07 September 2013 - 03:25 PM

In the first 2 years of my degree, that means 12 courses, around 4 were about programming.

The progression was:

learning algorithms and control structures -> learning basic data structures and pseudocode ->
learning advanced data structures and put all of that in a programming language -> shift to object oriented programming and patterns.

So the "programming" part isn't that intensive at all, and you lightly touch over programming languages. Its pretty much the big elephant in the room that you're supposed to learn to progress anyway.

 

Now the other 8 courses dealt with algebra, function analysis, statistics, logic and boolean algebra, assembly, logic gates and low level workings of CPUs, system/organization analysis and database design and normalization.

And still all of those subjects are pretty much introductory, you're not going to skillfully use SSE intrinsics in your codebase after an assembly course, you're not going to understand everything inside the CPU after a few classes on logic gates and basic circuits, you're not going to properly make a big database after just learning small normalization and what a schema is. It is a very "broadener" of knowledge, it can open your mind to many, many applications that computing in general can have.

 

I consider it a good experience.


#1TheChubu

Posted 07 September 2013 - 03:24 PM

In the first 2 years of my degree, that means 12 courses, around 4 were about programming.

The progression was:

learning algorithms and control structures -> learning basic data structures and pseudocode ->
learning advanced data structures and put all of that in a programming language -> shift to object oriented programming and patterns.

So the "programming" part isn't that intensive at all, and you lightly touch over programming languages. Its pretty much the big elephant in the room that you're supposed to learn to progress anyway.

 

Now the other 8 courses dealt with algebra, function analysis, statistics, logic and boolean algebra, assembly, logic gates and low level workings of CPUs, system/organization analysis and database design and normalization.

And still all of those subjects are pretty much introductory, you're not going to skillfully use SSE intrinsics in your codebase after an assembly course, you're not going to understand everything inside the CPU after a few classes on logic gates and basic circuits, you're not going to properly make a big database after just learning small normalization and what a schema is. It is a very "broadener" of knowledge, it can open your mind to many, many applications that computing in general can have.

I consider it a good experience.


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