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#Actuallask1

Posted 17 September 2013 - 04:45 PM

Hi guys,

 

It has been awhile since I last posted. I wouldn't exactly call the project that I am working on a game however, I am using OpenGL ES 2 in C++ to take advantage of the gpu on a device that really does not have that many resources to use. Even with OpenGL my program seemed to be running slow just because so many polygons were on the screen so what I have done is prebaked all the graphics to a texture during runtime and then displayed them as a texture. When I am prebaking a large amount of textures during runtime I run into memory problems since all these textures are filling up all the gpu memory.

 

My Question

What I am asking is if anyone can just throw me suggestions about reducing the memory of these textures that are generated at runtime. I apologize for being so vague with my question.

 

Thanks,

 

John

 

EDIT

 

I have tried prebaking the graphics right before they appear on the screen and destroying them as they leave and although this works I would like to avoid it. It may also be useful to know that I am using a FBO.


#3lask1

Posted 17 September 2013 - 04:12 PM

Hi guys,

 

It has been awhile since I last posted. I wouldn't exactly call the project that I am working on a game however, I am using OpenGL ES 2 in C++ to take advantage of the gpu on a device that really does not have that many resources to use. Even with OpenGL my program seemed to be running slow just because so many polygons were on the screen so what I have done is prebaked all the graphics to a texture during runtime and then displayed them as a texture. When I am prebaking a large amount of textures during runtime I run into memory problems since all these textures are filling up all the gpu memory.

 

My Question

What I am asking is if anyone can just throw me suggestions about reducing the memory of these textures that are generated at runtime. I apologize for being so vague with my question.

 

Thanks,

 

John

 

EDIT

 

I have tried prebaking the graphics right before they appear on the screen and destroying them as they leave and although this works I would like to avoid it. Maybe it will be also useful to know that I am using an FBO.


#2lask1

Posted 17 September 2013 - 03:48 PM

Hi guys,

 

It has been awhile since I last posted. I wouldn't exactly call the project that I am working on a game however, I am using OpenGL ES 2 in C++ to take advantage of the gpu on a device that really does not have that many resources to use. Even with OpenGL my program seemed to be running slow just because so many polygons were on the screen so what I have done is prebaked all the graphics to a texture during runtime and then displayed them as a texture. When I am prebaking a large amount of textures during runtime I run into memory problems since all these textures are filling up all the gpu memory.

 

My Question

What I am asking is if anyone can just throw me suggestions about reducing the memory of these textures that are generated at runtime. I apologize for being so vague with my question.

 

Thanks,

 

John


#1lask1

Posted 17 September 2013 - 03:47 PM

Hi guys,

 

It has been awhile since I last posted. I wouldn't exactly call the project that I am working on a game however, I am using OpenGL ES 2 in C++ to take advantage of the gpu on a device that really does not have that many resources to use. Even with OpenGL my program seemed to be running slow just because so many polygons were on the screen so what I have done is prebaked all the graphics to a texture during runtime and then displayed them as a texture. When I am prebaking a large amount of textures during runtime I run into memory problems since all these textures are filling up all the gpu memory.

 

My Question

What I am asking is if anyone can just throw me suggestions about reducing the memory of these textures that are generated at runtime. I apologize for being so vague with my question.

 

Thanks,

 

John


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