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#Actualfrob

Posted 20 September 2013 - 11:25 AM

Let's look at a few of those details.
 

I was attending IADT Vegas

The school offers a "Bachelor of Fine Arts in Game Production".  It is accredited as a trade degree.
 
That is NOT the degree normally used for game programmers, which is a traditional Computer Science degree.
 
It looks like you unfortunately picked up a school that wants your money by offering something popular rather than wanting you to get a solid education.  Sadly of the over 4000 schools offering bachelors degrees in the United States, some of them are like that. 
 

I have 6 years of Game Design Experience.

When employers use the word "experience", they mean time spent as a full-time employee with that job title. You have six years of personal projects. Your personal projects may be impressive and noteworthy, and if that is the case an employer would consider them as evidence that you can do the job. Even so, it is not what employers mean by "experience".

My reasons for leaving College, where simply that I was told by the Academic Advisor that I should look for a job, as they where an excellerated school and it would be a waste of time and money to stay. She told me I should find a job, and just start working. Even the Chair of Game Production said the same thing. They just said I was too advanced for the School.


It is quite likely that they are correct, although that probably says more about the school than the student.

Just looking over what the school covers makes me doubt that a student with those competencies would succeed in the industry. It looks like they lightly touch on some art subjects and don't cover any programming topics in depth. 

Do you have a solid grasp on all the core CS algorithms and core CS data structures? Could you explain the inner workings of a linked list, dynamic array, heap, stack, kd-tree, and a hash table? Could you implement any of them in less than an hour? If I asked you to implement at ten different sorting methods, could you do it in less than a day, and also explain cases when each sorting method would be the best? Do you have at least a passing understanding of how compilers and linkers work, how operating systems work, how computers communicate, how grammars and formal languages work, and what is meant by algorithm complexity? Could you explain when an O(n^4) algorithm or a factorial-time algorithm gives acceptable performance, and a case when linear time algorithm may be too slow?

Do you have a solid understanding of linear algebra? That is the basic underpinning of 3D mathematics, so you better be able to not just explain matrix multiplies, vectors, dot products and cross products, quaternions and Euler angles, but also explain why each would be important in games, with examples. Do you have at least a passing understanding of discrete mathematics and calculus? Everything in computers is discrete mathematics so there is no avoiding the subject, and calculus is useful although often ignored by gameplay programmers.

I can tell from reading your forum posts that you are either lacking skills in communications and written English, or you are choosing not to apply them. Proper spelling and grammar are important in written communication.

These are only a few things you should know. Getting your degree means more than just knowing the topics. Having earned the degree implies that you have reached the point where you are able to learn on your own, or at least with minimal guidance. It also means you have the tenacity to finish a long project even when parts of it may be difficult. It generally means a person has other competencies, such as the ability to work.

 

 

There was a time when you didn't need a CS degree to succeed at making games and be competitive in the marketplace.  Today it is rare to find self-educated programmers who can compete effectively.


#1frob

Posted 20 September 2013 - 11:23 AM

Let's look at a few of those details.
 

I was attending IADT Vegas

The school offers a "Bachelor of Fine Arts in Game Production".  It is accredited as a trade degree.
 
That is NOT the degree normally used for game programmers, which is a traditional Computer Science degree.
 
It looks like you unfortunately picked up a school that wants your money by offering something popular rather than wanting you to get a solid education.  Sadly of the over 4000 schools offering bachelors degrees in the United States, some of them are like that. 
 

I have 6 years of Game Design Experience.

When employers use the word "experience", they mean time spent as a full-time employee with that job title. You have six years of personal projects. Your personal projects may be impressive and noteworthy, and if that is the case an employer would consider them as evidence that you can do the job. Even so, it is not what employers mean by "experience".

My reasons for leaving College, where simply that I was told by the Academic Advisor that I should look for a job, as they where an excellerated school and it would be a waste of time and money to stay. She told me I should find a job, and just start working. Even the Chair of Game Production said the same thing. They just said I was too advanced for the School.


It is quite likely that they are correct, although that probably says more about the school than the student.

Just looking over what the school covers makes me doubt that a student with those competencies would succeed in the industry. It looks like they lightly touch on some art subjects and don't cover any programming topics in depth. 

Do you have a solid grasp on all the core CS algorithms and core CS data structures? Could you explain the inner workings of a linked list, dynamic array, heap, stack, kd-tree, and a hash table? Could you implement any of them in less than an hour? If I asked you to implement at ten different sorting methods, could you do it in less than a day, and also explain cases when each sorting method would be the best? Do you have at least a passing understanding of how compilers and linkers work, how operating systems work, how computers communicate, how grammars and formal languages work, and what is meant by algorithm complexity? Could you explain when an O(n^4) algorithm or a factorial-time algorithm gives acceptable performance, and a case when linear time algorithm may be too slow?

Do you have a solid understanding of linear algebra? That is the basic underpinning of 3D mathematics, so you better be able to not just explain matrix multiplies, vectors, dot products and cross products, quaternions and Euler angles, but also explain why each would be important in games, with examples. Do you have at least a passing understanding of discrete mathematics and calculus? Everything in computers is discrete mathematics so there is no avoiding the subject, and calculus is useful although often ignored by gameplay programmers.

I can tell from reading your forum posts that you are either lacking skills in communications and written English, or you are choosing not to apply them. Proper spelling and grammar are important in written communication.

These are only a few things you should know. Getting your degree means more than just knowing the topics. Having earned the degree implies that you have reached the point where you are able to learn on your own, or at least with minimal guidance. It also means you have the tenacity to finish a long project even when parts of it may be difficult. It generally means a person has other competencies, such as the ability to work.

 

 

There was a time when you didn't need a CS degree to succeed at making games.  Today it is rare to find self-educated programmers.


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