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#ActualKryzon

Posted 25 September 2013 - 11:28 PM

Most of the time, the retro look comes from the game using a Virtual Resolution, or Nearest-Neighbour scaling (which preserves pixelation if you're scaling to resolutions that are multiples of the original - else it doesn't map 1:1 and the result is distorted). 

A virtual resolution is used to represent graphics with an appearance differently than that of the graphics context of the application - in other words, you can use it to display pixels that look bigger.

If you want your game to have a 480 x 800 resolution and still look retro\pixel-art, you can use a virtual resolution of 240 x 400. This maps in a way that the pixels will look two times bigger than they normally should.

This means you can open your painting program, create a canvas of 240 x 400 and start drawing your graphics with pixel art. When you're going to display your graphics in your game, they'll be scaled 200% to perfectly fit the 480 x 800 area.

 

Always do it like that, by having the engine scale the small graphics up to a bigger size.

Never draw the graphics directly with the doubled size, otherwise you would be wasting memory.


#2Kryzon

Posted 25 September 2013 - 11:26 PM

Most of the time, the retro look comes from the game using a Virtual Resolution, or Nearest-Neighbour scaling (which preserves pixelation if you're scaling to resolutions that are multiples of the original - else it doesn't map 1:1 and the result is distorted). 

A virtual resolution is used to represent graphics with an appearance differently than that of the graphics context of the application - in other words, you can use it to display pixels that look bigger.

If you want your game to have a 480 x 800 resolution and still look retro\pixel-art, you can use a virtual resolution of 240 x 400. This maps in a way that the pixels will look two times bigger than they normally should.

This means you can open your painting program, create a canvas of 240 x 400 and start drawing your graphics with pixel art. When you're going to display your graphics in your game, they'll be scaled 200% to perfectly fit the 480 x 800 area.

 

Always do it like that, by having the engine scale the small graphics up to a bigger size.

Never draw the graphics directly with the doubled size, otherwise you would be wasting memory.

 

PS: If you read it like this: "480 x 800", it means the width is 480 and the height is 800. This means it's a vertical screen and not horizontal as it is in that example screenshot you posted. It makes sense in this being vertical, since it's the common way that phones are structured.


#1Kryzon

Posted 25 September 2013 - 11:22 PM

Most of the time, the retro look comes from the game using a Virtual Resolution, or Nearest-Neighbour scaling (which preserves pixelation if you're scaling to resolutions that are multiples of the original - else it doesn't map 1:1 and the result is distorted). 

A virtual resolution is used to represent graphics with an appearance differently than that of the graphics context of the application - in other words, you can use it to display pixels that look bigger.

If you want your game to have a 480 x 800 resolution and still look retro\pixel-art, you can use a virtual resolution of 240 x 400. This maps in a way that the pixels will look two times bigger than they normally should.

This means you can open your painting program, create a canvas of 240 x 400 and start drawing your graphics with pixel art. When you're going to display your graphics in your game, they'll be scaled 200% to perfectly fit the 480 x 800 area.

 

PS: If you read it like this: "480 x 800", it means the width is 480 and the height is 800. This means it's a vertical screen and not horizontal as it is in that example screenshot you posted. It makes sense in this being vertical, since it's the common way that phones are structured.


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