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#Actualtonemgub

Posted 03 October 2013 - 03:20 PM

The use of HeapAlloc() is entirely implementation-dependent and not mandatory. In fact, it is perfectly legitimate - even common - for C or C++ runtimes to have their own allocators running between the OS and the application.

You also missed the other important factor, which is that we're talking about a custom allocator here, which by definition is a layer of indirection between whatever the runtime offers (whether that goes straight to the OS or not) and the application itself.

 

Unless his custom allocator (or the runtime allocator) uses virtual memory directly, or if it uses non-virtual memory, the memory allocated by his own allocator will come from a process heap.

 

Anyway, I have no idea how ASLR works, but Goolge'ing it, I did find mentions that the randomized addresses it produces can be seen in WinDbg...

 

So I think it should also be visible in Visual Studio.


#1tonemgub

Posted 03 October 2013 - 03:19 PM

The use of HeapAlloc() is entirely implementation-dependent and not mandatory. In fact, it is perfectly legitimate - even common - for C or C++ runtimes to have their own allocators running between the OS and the application.

You also missed the other important factor, which is that we're talking about a custom allocator here, which by definition is a layer of indirection between whatever the runtime offers (whether that goes straight to the OS or not) and the application itself.

 

Unless his custom allocator (or the runtime allocator) uses virtual memory directly, or if it uses non-virtual memory, the memory allocated by his own allocator will come from a process heap.

 

Anyway, I have no idea how ASLR works, but Goolge'ing it, I did find mentions that the randomized addresses it produces can be seen in WinDbg...


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