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#ActualBGB

Posted 16 October 2013 - 01:40 AM

 

2. If God doesn't exist you must highly consider life to be automatically generated in the universe. The universe is homogenous, the same events repeat everywhere, so you should have life everywhere

Welcome to Fermi's paradox.

 

 

 

possibly, but there is another factor:

as-is, at present, most of this "everywhere" is very far away, and thus any alien life can't be confirmed or denied (via observation).

 

(ignoring claims of UFOs and conspiracy theories and so on...).

 

 

more likely it is identifying if anything is alive on other planets around in this solar system (microbes, ...), and if some more distant planet has lots of critters (or a civilization), there isn't really any good way to know.

 

 

however, whether or not this life exists may not say that much, since there isn't much to say life *doesn't* exist elsewhere, and otherwise it may boil down largely to a probabilities game (as-in, if the chances of complex life existing is statistically rare, so chance encounters are uncommon or unlikely...).

 

though, it has turned out that apparently planets are pretty common at least, so there is at least this is a starting point...


#2BGB

Posted 16 October 2013 - 01:34 AM

 

2. If God doesn't exist you must highly consider life to be automatically generated in the universe. The universe is homogenous, the same events repeat everywhere, so you should have life everywhere

Welcome to Fermi's paradox.

 

 

 

possibly, but there is another factor:

as-is, at present, most of this "everywhere" is very far away, and thus any alien life can't be confirmed or denied (via observation).

 

(ignoring claims of UFOs and conspiracy theories and so on...).

 

 

more likely it is identifying if anything is alive on other planets around in this solar system (microbes, ...), and if some more distant planet has lots of critters, there isn't really any good way to know.

 

 

however, whether or not this life exists may not say that much, since there isn't much to say life *doesn't* exist elsewhere, and otherwise it may boil down largely to a probabilities game (as-in, if the chances of complex life existing is statistically rare...).

 

though, it has turned out that apparently planets are pretty common at least, so there is at least this as a starting point...


#1BGB

Posted 16 October 2013 - 01:34 AM

 

2. If God doesn't exist you must highly consider life to be automatically generated in the universe. The universe is homogenous, the same events repeat everywhere, so you should have life everywhere

Welcome to Fermi's paradox.

 

 

 

possibly, but there is another factor:

as-is, at present, most of this "everywhere" is very far away, and thus any alien life can't be confirmed or denied.

 

(ignoring claims of UFOs and conspiracy theories and so on...).

 

 

more likely it is identifying if anything is alive on other planets around in this solar system (microbes, ...), and if some more distant planet has lots of critters, there isn't really any good way to know.

 

 

however, whether or not this life exists may not say that much, since there isn't much to say life *doesn't* exist elsewhere, and otherwise it may boil down largely to a probabilities game (as-in, if the chances of complex life existing is statistically rare...).

 

though, it has turned out that apparently planets are pretty common at least, so there is at least this as a starting point...


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