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FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


Read more in this forum topic or make sure you're signed up (from the right-hand sidebar on the homepage) and read Thursday's newsletter to get in the running!


#ActualjHaskell

Posted 24 October 2013 - 11:47 AM

Work on creating a portfolio of demos to show prospective employers.  These projects should have a few key traits in common:

  1. Keep them relatively small.  Don't expect interviewers to spend more than a few minutes looking at them, unless they are truly wowzer demonstrations.
  2. Each demo should be a focused demonstration.  A graphics demo doesn't need great sound or AI (or really any, for that matter).  A content management demo doesn't actually need great content (typically just a lot of content, hopefully to show off how well it's all managed).  A multi-threaded demo should only be complicated enough to provide the possibility of race conditions, dead-locks, etc to show successful synchronization and concurrency.
  3. The portfolio should contain a single, concise document that lists each demo with a short overview of what the project is and what it's meant to demonstrate.  All other documentation should just be the source code.
  4. Spend the time to make sure the source code is polished.  This is your sales pitch to the company.  Make it a good one.

Outside your portfolio, for your own usage, create a list of talking points for your portfolio.  Two talking points you should have for each demo are:

What was your biggest hurdle/challenge in creating that demo?

What was your biggest sense of accomplishment from creating that demo?

 

Other potential talking points (be sure to think about potential talking points WHILE you work on the demos):

Other methods of implementation you thought about when developing a given demo, and why you chose the one you did.

Any funny or oh duh! moments when working on a given demo.  Just be careful not to talk about anything that may make you look incompetent, but everybody makes mistakes, and sometimes those mistakes are funny.  Other developers can appreciate the humor and being able to acknowledge that you make mistakes is an important part of meshing well with a team.

 

Keep the portfolio as small and as easy to distribute as possible.  That means minimal media.  Simple graphics and audio.  You're after a Software Development job, not a graphics artist or musician job.  The portfolio should be easily distributable by email, so no more than a few megabytes at the most.

 

And don't provide demos of stuff you aren't absolutely comfortable discussing.  You'll only ruin your credibility if you provide a demo of some advanced graphics technique and during the interview you completely fumble any discussion about that demo, and the pressures of interviewing can sometimes turn less than solid understanding of a concept into a blank stare.


#1jHaskell

Posted 24 October 2013 - 11:46 AM

Work on creating a portfolio of demos to show prospective employers.  These projects should have a few key traits in common:

  1. Keep them relatively small.  Don't expect interviewers to spend more than a few minutes looking at them, unless they are truly wowzer demonstrations.
  2. Each demo should be a focused demonstration.  A graphics demo doesn't need great sound or AI (or really any, for that matter).  A content management demo doesn't actually need great content (typically just a lot of content, hopefully to show off how well it's all managed).  A multi-threaded demo should only be complicated enough to provide the possibility of race conditions, dead-locks, etc to show successful synchronization and concurrency.
  3. The portfolio should contain a single, concise document that lists each demo with a short overview of what the project is and what it's meant to demonstrate.  All other documentation should just be the source code.
  4. Spend the time to make sure the source code is polished.  This is your sales pitch to the company.  Make it a good one.

Outside your portfolio, for your own usage, create a list of talking points for your portfolio.  Two talking points you should have for each demo are:

What was your biggest hurdle/challenge in creating that demo?

What was your biggest sense of accomplishment from creating that demo?

 

Other potential talking points (be sure to think about potential talking points WHILE you work on the demos):

Other methods of implementation you thought about when developing a given demo, and why you chose the one you did.

Any funny or oh duh! moments when working on a given demo.  Just be careful not to talk about anything that may make you look incompetent, but everybody makes mistakes, and sometimes those mistakes are funny.  Other developers can appreciate the humor and being able to acknowledge that you make mistakes is an important part of meshing well with a team.

 

Keep the portfolio as small and as easy to distribute as possible.  That means minimal media.  Simple graphics and audio.  You're after a Software Development job, not a graphics artist or musician job.  The portfolio should be easily distributable by email, so no more than a few megabytes at the most.

 

And don't provide demos of stuff you aren't absolutely comfortable discussing.  You'll only ruin your credibility if you provide a demo of some advanced graphics technique and during the interview you completely fumble any discussion about that demo.


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