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#ActualTheComet

Posted 12 November 2013 - 11:50 AM

@ankhd - Grids are memory expensive and don't deliver accurate results when compared to a navigation mesh.

 

 

 

What exactly are the nodes of A* on navmesh?

 

Let me shed some more light on this question.

 

The nodes of A* on a navigation mesh are the vertices of the navigation mesh. When searching with A*, you assume the navigation mesh is a waypoint graph, because due to the convexity of each polygon, you know that each node is directly connected to every other node within the polygon, so there's absolutely no difference between a search on a navigation mesh and a search on a waypoint graph.

 

This article explains it very well.

http://udn.epicgames.com/Three/NavigationMeshReference.html

 

The only difference between a navigation mesh and a waypoint graph is the vertices of a navigation mesh hold information about an area rather than a single passable point. After the path has been found, the next step is to apply a funnel algorithm to simplify the found nodes into a more direct path.

http://digestingduck.blogspot.de/2010/03/simple-stupid-funnel-algorithm.html

 

I recommend reading through the documentation of the two libraries recastnavigation and detour. They are documented on CritterAI's website: http://www.critterai.org


#1TheComet

Posted 12 November 2013 - 11:50 AM

@ankhd - Grids are memory expensive and don't deliver accurate results when compared to a navigation mesh.

 

What exactly are the nodes of A* on navmesh?

 

Let me shed some more light on this question.

 

The nodes of A* on a navigation mesh are the vertices of the navigation mesh. When searching with A*, you assume the navigation mesh is a waypoint graph, because due to the convexity of each polygon, you know that each node is directly connected to every other node within the polygon, so there's absolutely no difference between a search on a navigation mesh and a search on a waypoint graph.

 

This article explains it very well.

http://udn.epicgames.com/Three/NavigationMeshReference.html

 

The only difference between a navigation mesh and a waypoint graph is the vertices of a navigation mesh hold information about an area rather than a single passable point. After the path has been found, the next step is to apply a funnel algorithm to simplify the found nodes into a more direct path.

http://digestingduck.blogspot.de/2010/03/simple-stupid-funnel-algorithm.html

 

I recommend reading through the documentation of the two libraries recastnavigation and detour. They are documented on CritterAI's website: http://www.critterai.org


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