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#ActualKryzon

Posted 29 November 2013 - 12:21 PM

Hello.

I don't know that many games to ascertain that no game at all hasn't got what you want, but it's very unlikely that you will find any professional game with the assets in interchange formats (these common formats that 3DS Max and Blender can import). I hope someone here knows of some games like that.

 

As I recall, there are two reasons for this:

 

1) Metadata. The artists load the models (originally under an interchange format) into their game engine, establish tags, animations, collision primitives etc. and compile or save all that information into a single file. The final game file has a proprietary structure with more than the geometry and animation information.

 

2) Performance. An interchange format can be optimized to only keep what the game engine needs to know about the model, but then you walk away from the original specification of the format and cannot load it into the modelling programmes anymore.

Some engines also serialize this final game-engine model so it's faster to load, but makes the file compatible with only the game engine that produced it. This means you don't have to parse chunks of the interchange file or rebuild the mesh into memory; You can deserialize it straight into memory, which is a faster process.

 

With that in mind, there are a couple of tools that read final game-engine formats:

MilkShape3D - 3D modeller and animator programme. If you look at the formats it loads you'll have an idea of which games to go after. You can import a game format and export to an interchange format (like FBX for instance).

Wally - Texture editing tool that opens a few proprietary game texture formats from id Software. The official website is down.


#5Kryzon

Posted 29 November 2013 - 12:19 PM

Hello.

I don't know that many games to ascertain that no game at all hasn't got what you want, but it's very unlikely that you will find any professional game with the assets in interchange formats (these common formats that 3DS Max and Blender can import).

 

As I recall, there are two reasons for this:

 

1) Metadata. The artists load the models (originally under an interchange format) into their game engine, establish tags, animations, collision primitives etc. and compile or save all that information into a single file. The final game file has a proprietary structure with more than the geometry and animation information.

 

2) Performance. An interchange format can be optimized to only keep what the game engine needs to know about the model, but then you walk away from the original specification of the format and cannot load it into the modelling programmes anymore.

Some engines also serialize this final game-engine model so it's faster to load, but makes the file compatible with only the game engine that produced it. This means you don't have to parse chunks of the interchange file or rebuild the mesh into memory; You can deserialize it straight into memory, which is a faster process.

 

With that in mind, there are a couple of tools that read final game-engine formats:

MilkShape3D - 3D modeller and animator programme. If you look at the formats it loads you'll have an idea of which games to go after. You can import a game format and export to an interchange format (like FBX for instance).

Wally - Texture editing tool that opens a few proprietary game texture formats from id Software. The official website is down.


#4Kryzon

Posted 29 November 2013 - 12:19 PM

Hello.

I don't know that many games to ascertain that no game at all hasn't got what you want, but it's very unlikely that you will find any professional game with the assets in interchange formats (these common formats that 3DS Max and Blender can import).

 

As I recall, there are two reasons for this:

 

1) Metadata. The artists load the models (originally under an interchange format) into their game engine, establish tags, animations, collision primitives etc. and compile or save all that information into a single file. The final game file has a proprietary structure with more than the geometry and animation information.

 

2) Performance. An interchange format can be optimized to only keep what the game engine needs to know about the model, but then you walk away from the original specification of the format and cannot load it into the modelling programmes anymore.

Some engines also serialize this final game-engine model so it's faster to load, but makes the file compatible with only the game engine that produced it. This means you don't have to parse chunks of the interchange file or rebuild the mesh into memory; You can deserialize it straight into memory, which is a faster process.

 

With that in mind, there are a couple of tools that read final game-engine formats:

MilkShape3D - 3D modeller and animator programme. If you look at the formats it loads you'll have an idea of which games to go after. You can import a game format and export to an interchange format (like FBX for instance)

Wally - Texture editing tool that opens a few proprietary game texture formats from id Software. The official website is down.


#3Kryzon

Posted 29 November 2013 - 12:07 PM

Hello.

I don't know that many games to ascertain that no game at all hasn't got what you want, but it's very unlikely that you will find any professional game with the assets in interchange formats (these common formats that 3DS Max and Blender can import).

 

As I recall, there are two reasons for this:

 

1) Metadata. The artists load the models (originally under an interchange format) into their game engine, establish tags, animations, collision primitives etc. and compile or save all that information into a single file. The final game file has a proprietary structure with more than the geometry and animation information.

 

2) Performance. An interchange format can be optimized to only keep what the game engine needs to know about the model, but then you walk away from the original specification of the format and cannot load it into the modelling programmes anymore.

Some engines also serialize this final game-engine model so it's faster to load, but makes the file compatible with only the game engine that produced it. This means you don't have to parse chunks of the interchange file or rebuild the mesh into memory; You can deserialize it straight into memory, which is a faster process.

 

With that in mind, there are a couple of tools that read final game-engine formats:

MilkShape3D - 3D modeller and animator programme. If you look at the formats it loads you'll have an idea of which games to go after.

Wally - Texture editing tool that opens a few proprietary game texture formats from id Software. The official website is down.


#2Kryzon

Posted 29 November 2013 - 12:04 PM

Hello.

I don't know that many games to ascertain that no game at all hasn't got what you want, but it's very unlikely that you will find any professional game with the assets in interchange formats (these common formats that 3DS Max and Blender can import).

 

As I recall, there are two reasons for this:

 

1) Metadata. The artists load the models (originally under an interchange format) into their game engine, establish tags, animations, collision primitives etc. and compile or save all that information into a single file. The final game file has a proprietary structure with more than the geometry and animation information.

 

2) Performance. An interchange format can be optimized to only keep what the game engine needs to know about the model, but then you walk away from the original specification of the format and cannot load it into the modelling programs anymore.

Some engines also serialize this final game-engine model so it's faster to load, but makes the file compatible with only the game engine that produced it. This means you don't have to parse chunks of the interchange file or rebuild the mesh into memory; You can deserialize it straight into memory, which is a faster process.

 

With that in mind, there are a couple of tools that read final game-engine formats:

MilkShape3D - 3D modeller and animator programme. If you look at the formats it loads you'll have an idea of which games to go after.

Wally - Texture editing tool that opens a few proprietary game texture formats from id Software. The official website is down.


#1Kryzon

Posted 29 November 2013 - 12:01 PM

Hello.

I don't know that many games to ascertain that no game at all hasn't got what you want, but it's very unlikely that you will find any professional game with the assets in interchange formats (these common formats that 3DS Max and Blender can import).

 

As I recall, there are two reasons for this:

 

1) Metadata. The artists load the models (originally under an interchange format) into their game engine, establish tags, animations, collision primitives etc. and compile or save all that information into a single file. The final game file has a proprietary structure with more than the geometry and animation information.

 

2) Performance. An interchange format can be optimized to only keep what the game engine needs to know about the model, but then you walk away from the original specification of the format and cannot load it into the modelling programs anymore.

Some engines also serialize this final game-engine format so it's faster to load. This means you don't have to parse chunks of the file or rebuild the internal mesh into memory; You can deserialize it straight into memory, which is a faster process.

 

With that in mind, there are a couple of tools that read final game-engine formats:

MilkShape3D - 3D modeller and animator programme. If you look at the formats it loads you'll have an idea of which games to go after.

Wally - Texture editing tool that opens a few proprietary game texture formats from id Software. The official website is down.


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