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#ActualSwordmaster

Posted 05 December 2013 - 02:09 AM

There was an arcade game entitled 'War Gods' back in the 90's, and I remember it for having in particularly photorealistic character models (more so for one character at the least; Vallah).  Which at this time could be considered the infant stages of 3D games to some.

 

Anyways, this follwing video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ro8icXuBkP8  shows some gameplay from said game.  To me at least, the character Vallah, has quite realistic looking skin and sheen for a game of that era anyways.  I mean, I look at some 3D games nowadays and while I can see a step in the right direction... many triple-A games end up looking almost 'cartoonish' in their final product, intentional or not.  Case in point; the most recent Mortal Kombat or Killer instinct.  I'm not saying this game looks 100% realistic either, but I think the developers did a pretty god job with the visuals considering it's age and in comparison to the aforementioned games.

 

My question is this though...  technically speaking, how did the 3D modelers achieve this look?  Did they do anything out of the norm from current games?  I know video talent is sited in the credits along with the actors that played the character.  What exactly is 'video talent' though?

I'm quite new to all the inner workings of 3D, so maybe someone can enlighten me on the matter.  Also I know this game may not be the best example, but it's the best example I can give. 

 

Thank you to anyone who can offer me any advice.


#2Swordmaster

Posted 05 December 2013 - 02:09 AM

There was an arcade game entitled 'War Gods' back in the 90's, and I remember it for having in particularly photorealistic character models (more so for one character at the least; Vallah).  Which at this time could be considered the infant stages of 3D games to some.

 

Anyways, this follwing video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ro8icXuBkP8  shows some gameplay from said game.  To me at least, the character Vallah, has quite realistic looking skin and sheen for a game of that era anyways.  I mean, I look at some 3D games nowadays and while I can see a step in the right direction... many triple-A games end up looking almost 'cartoonish' in their final product, intentional or not.  Case in point; the most recent Mortal Kombat or Killer instinct.  I'm not saying this game looks 100% realistic either, but I think the developers did a pretty god job with the visuals considering it's age and in comparison to the aforementioned games.

 

My question is this though...  technically speaking, how did the 3D modelers achieve this look?  Did they do anything out of the norm from current games?  I know video talent is sited in the credits along with the actors that played the character.  What exactly is 'video talent' though?

I'm quite new to all the inner workings of 3D, so maybe someone can enlighten me on the matter.  Also I know this game may not be the best example, but it's the best example I can give.  Thank you to anyone who can offer me any advice.


#1Swordmaster

Posted 05 December 2013 - 02:08 AM

There was an arcade game entitled 'War Gods' back in the 90's, and I remember it for having in particularly photorealistic character models (more so for one character at the least; Vallah).  Which at this time could be considered the infant stages of 3D games to some.

 

Anyways, this follwing video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ro8icXuBkP8  shows some gameplay from said game.  To me at least, the character Vallah, has quite realistic looking skin and sheen for a game of that era anyways.  I mean, I look at some 3D games nowadays and while I can see a step in the right direction... many triple-A games end up looking almost 'cartoonish' in their final product, intentional or not.  Case in point; the most recent Mortal Kombat or Killer instinct.  I'm not saying this game looks 100% realistic either, but I think the developers did a pretty god job with the visuals considering it's age and in comparison to the aforementioned games.

 

My question is this though...  technically speaking, how did the 3D modelers achieve this look?  Did they do anything out of the norm from current games?  I know video talent is sited in the credits along with the actors that played the character.  What exactly is 'video talent' though?

I'm quite new to all the inner workings of 3D, so maybe someone can enlighten me on the matter.  Also I know this game may not be the best example, but it's the best example I can give right now.  Thank you to anyone who can offer me any advice.

 

 

 

 


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