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#ActualS1CA

Posted 10 February 2014 - 08:30 AM

How many games have you made yourself? Do you enter competitions like Ludum Dare? (etc etc) How many mods/levels have you made for existing games? Have you learnt to do any programming and/or art? Have you showcased your games (and other creations) much on forums such as this one? Have you covered a broad range of game genres in the stuff you've made (when it's a real 'job' you have to produce good work even for genres and IPs you hate)?

 
I haven't made any games of my own, but I have been thinking of some ideas.
...
Yeah I guess I need to make more games of my own.


Definitely! smile.png

Most ideas sound good. Most look good on paper too. In reality most have major flaws. Whenever I tell people (outside the industry) that I make games they tell me their 'great' games ideas (that are usually "it's just like XYZ but birds instead of planes") or how the film script they have in their head would make a great game. Sometimes (rarely) people even have ideas about actual gameplay mechanics. Everyone who plays games has some ideas and things they'd do differently.

Talk is cheap, ideas are cheaper - but how do you know an idea is going to work or be fun to play?

Turning those ideas into a reality by actually making something is how you prove your designs work. It's ok if your ideas fail - it's actually good if they fail - that's good experience, and if you get used to failing early it saves you time (and money once it's a job).

An incredibly important skill for a games designer is to work within constraints (time, hardware power, etc). You only fully realise the constraints inherent in your ideas by putting them into practice.

You might do some of that stuff on a degree course, but it's really not enough - your peers are coming in with completed games, mods for existing games and lots of little side prototypes that they've done across multiple genres simply because they love doing it not because they were required to do that as part of a course. This isn't an industry that does apprenticeships - you have to do that part on your own!

BTW to prove things like core gameplay mechanics ideas shouldn't need too much technical or art skill. 2D prototypes or simple boxy 3D are sufficient to prove most. On a related note, when something's actually playable, that itself generates new ideas and improvements.
 
 

Do you work for Ubisoft Reflections in Newcastle? What Universities do you work with? I attended Northumbria University and did BSc Computer Games Design / Production. I had a guy from Ubisoft Reflection, come in and teach some of our module. Teeside University have links to Ubisoft.


Yep, I work at Reflections smile.png The universities we work with change from year to year, and the level of connection varies and involve more than just placements (e.g. guest lectures), so "all of the local ones" is the most accurate answer.

#4S1CA

Posted 10 February 2014 - 08:29 AM

How many games have you made yourself? Do you enter competitions like Ludum Dare? (etc etc) How many mods/levels have you made for existing games? Have you learnt to do any programming and/or art? Have you showcased your games (and other creations) much on forums such as this one? Have you covered a broad range of game genres in the stuff you've made (when it's a real 'job' you have to produce good work even for genres and IPs you hate)?

 
I haven't made any games of my own, but I have been thinking of some ideas.
...
Yeah I guess I need to make more games of my own.


Definitely! smile.png

Most ideas sound good. Most look good on paper too. In reality most have major flaws. Whenever I tell people (outside the industry) that I make games they tell me their 'great' games ideas (that are usually "it's just like XYZ but birds instead of planes") or how the film script they have in their head would make a great game. Sometimes (rarely) people actually have ideas about actual gameplay mechanics. Everyone who plays games has some ideas and things they'd do differently.

Talk is cheap, ideas are cheaper - but how do you know an idea is going to work or be fun to play?

Turning those ideas into a reality by actually making something is how you prove your designs work. It's ok if your ideas fail - it's actually good if they fail - that's good experience, and if you get used to failing early it saves you time (and money once it's a job).

An incredibly important skill for a games designer is to work within constraints (time, hardware power, etc). You only fully realise the constraints inherent in your ideas by putting them into practice.

You might do some of that stuff on a degree course, but it's really not enough - your peers are coming in with completed games, mods for existing games and lots of little side prototypes that they've done across multiple genres simply because they love doing it not because they were required to do that as part of a course. This isn't an industry that does apprenticeships - you have to do that part on your own!

BTW to prove things like core gameplay mechanics ideas shouldn't need too much technical or art skill. 2D prototypes or simple boxy 3D are sufficient to prove most. On a related note, when something's actually playable, that itself generates new ideas and improvements.
 
 

Do you work for Ubisoft Reflections in Newcastle? What Universities do you work with? I attended Northumbria University and did BSc Computer Games Design / Production. I had a guy from Ubisoft Reflection, come in and teach some of our module. Teeside University have links to Ubisoft.


Yep, I work at Reflections smile.png The universities we work with change from year to year, and the level of connection varies and involve more than just placements (e.g. guest lectures), so "all of the local ones" is the most accurate answer.

#3S1CA

Posted 10 February 2014 - 08:29 AM

How many games have you made yourself? Do you enter competitions like Ludum Dare? (etc etc) How many mods/levels have you made for existing games? Have you learnt to do any programming and/or art? Have you showcased your games (and other creations) much on forums such as this one? Have you covered a broad range of game genres in the stuff you've made (when it's a real 'job' you have to produce good work even for genres and IPs you hate)?

 
I haven't made any games of my own, but I have been thinking of some ideas.
...
Yeah I guess I need to make more games of my own.


Definitely! smile.png

Most ideas sound good. Most look good on paper too. In reality most have major flaws. Whenever I tell people (outside the industry) that I make games they tell me their 'great' games ideas (that are usually "it's just like XYZ but birds instead of planes") or how the film script they have in their head would make a great game. Sometimes (rarely) people actually have ideas about actual gameplay mechanics. Everyone who plays games has some ideas and things they'd do differently.

Talk is cheap, ideas are cheaper - but how do you know an idea is going to work or be fun to play?

Turning those ideas into a reality by actually making something is how you prove your designs work. It's ok if your ideas fail - it's actually good if they fail - that's good experience, and if you get used to failing early it saves you time (and money once it's a job).

An incredibly important skill for a games designer is to work within constraints (time, hardware power, etc). You only fully realise the constraints inherent in your ideas by putting them into practice.

You might do some of that stuff on a degree course, but it's really not enough - your peers are coming in with completed games, mods for existing games and lots of little side prototypes that they've done across multiple genres simply because they love doing it not because they were required to do that as part of a course. This isn't an industry that does apprenticeships - you have to do that part on your own!

BTW to prove things like core gameplay mechanics ideas shouldn't need too much technical or art skill. 2D prototypes or simple boxy 3D are sufficient to prove most. On a related note, when something's actually playable, that itself generates new ideas and improvements.
 
 
 

Do you work for Ubisoft Reflections in Newcastle? What Universities do you work with? I attended Northumbria University and did BSc Computer Games Design / Production. I had a guy from Ubisoft Reflection, come in and teach some of our module. Teeside University have links to Ubisoft.




Yep, I work at Reflections smile.png The universities we work with change from year to year, and the level of connection varies and involve more than just placements (e.g. guest lectures), so "all of the local ones" is the most accurate answer.

#2S1CA

Posted 10 February 2014 - 08:28 AM

How many games have you made yourself? Do you enter competitions like Ludum Dare? (etc etc) How many mods/levels have you made for existing games? Have you learnt to do any programming and/or art? Have you showcased your games (and other creations) much on forums such as this one? Have you covered a broad range of game genres in the stuff you've made (when it's a real 'job' you have to produce good work even for genres and IPs you hate)?[/quote]
 
I haven't made any games of my own, but I have been thinking of some ideas.
...
Yeah I guess I need to make more games of my own.[/quote]

Definitely! smile.png

Most ideas sound good. Most look good on paper too. In reality most have major flaws. Whenever I tell people (outside the industry) that I make games they tell me their 'great' games ideas (that are usually "it's just like XYZ but birds instead of planes") or how the film script they have in their head would make a great game. Sometimes (rarely) people actually have ideas about actual gameplay mechanics. Everyone who plays games has some ideas and things they'd do differently.

Talk is cheap, ideas are cheaper - but how do you know an idea is going to work or be fun to play?

Turning those ideas into a reality by actually making something is how you prove your designs work. It's ok if your ideas fail - it's actually good if they fail - that's good experience, and if you get used to failing early it saves you time (and money once it's a job).

An incredibly important skill for a games designer is to work within constraints (time, hardware power, etc). You only fully realise the constraints inherent in your ideas by putting them into practice.

You might do some of that stuff on a degree course, but it's really not enough - your peers are coming in with completed games, mods for existing games and lots of little side prototypes that they've done across multiple genres simply because they love doing it not because they were required to do that as part of a course. This isn't an industry that does apprenticeships - you have to do that part on your own!

BTW to prove things like core gameplay mechanics ideas shouldn't need too much technical or art skill. 2D prototypes or simple boxy 3D are sufficient to prove most. On a related note, when something's actually playable, that itself generates new ideas and improvements.
 
 

Do you work for Ubisoft Reflections in Newcastle? What Universities do you work with? I attended Northumbria University and did BSc Computer Games Design / Production. I had a guy from Ubisoft Reflection, come in and teach some of our module. Teeside University have links to Ubisoft.



Yep, I work at Reflections smile.png The universities we work with change from year to year, and the level of connection varies and involve more than just placements (e.g. guest lectures), so "all of the local ones" is the most accurate answer.[/quote]
[/quote]


#1S1CA

Posted 10 February 2014 - 08:27 AM

How many games have you made yourself? Do you enter competitions like Ludum Dare? (etc etc) How many mods/levels have you made for existing games? Have you learnt to do any programming and/or art? Have you showcased your games (and other creations) much on forums such as this one? Have you covered a broad range of game genres in the stuff you've made (when it's a real 'job' you have to produce good work even for genres and IPs you hate)?[/quote]
 
I haven't made any games of my own, but I have been thinking of some ideas.
...
Yeah I guess I need to make more games of my own.[/quote][/quote]

Definitely! smile.png

Most ideas sound good. Most look good on paper too. In reality most have major flaws. Whenever I tell people (outside the industry) that I make games they tell me their 'great' games ideas (that are usually "it's just like XYZ but birds instead of planes") or how the film script they have in their head would make a great game. Sometimes (rarely) people actually have ideas about actual gameplay mechanics. Everyone who plays games has some ideas and things they'd do differently.

Talk is cheap, ideas are cheaper - but how do you know an idea is going to work or be fun to play?

Turning those ideas into a reality by actually making something is how you prove your designs work. It's ok if your ideas fail - it's actually good if they fail - that's good experience, and if you get used to failing early it saves you time (and money once it's a job).

An incredibly important skill for a games designer is to work within constraints (time, hardware power, etc). You only fully realise the constraints inherent in your ideas by putting them into practice.

You might do some of that stuff on a degree course, but it's really not enough - your peers are coming in with completed games, mods for existing games and lots of little side prototypes that they've done across multiple genres simply because they love doing it not because they were required to do that as part of a course. This isn't an industry that does apprenticeships - you have to do that part on your own!

BTW to prove things like core gameplay mechanics ideas shouldn't need too much technical or art skill. 2D prototypes or simple boxy 3D are sufficient to prove most. On a related note, when something's actually playable, that itself generates new ideas and improvements.

Do you work for Ubisoft Reflections in Newcastle? What Universities do you work with? I attended Northumbria University and did BSc Computer Games Design / Production. I had a guy from Ubisoft Reflection, come in and teach some of our module. Teeside University have links to Ubisoft.


Yep, I work at Reflections smile.png The universities we work with change from year to year, and the level of connection varies and involve more than just placements (e.g. guest lectures), so "all of the local ones" is the most accurate answer.


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