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FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


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#Actualdejaime

Posted 22 February 2014 - 12:04 PM

The problem with programming for both iPhone and Android is that Android uses open technologies, while iPhone uses apple's own breed of C, called Objective-C, that doesn't seem to be used anywhere outside of iThings.

HTML5 is a good choice, but even though it was thought as the new programming wonder, that initial hype has gone cold over problematic and incomplete implementations on most platforms; it's taking way too long to be fully supported. Still, I guess this is just a question of time.

There is the option of using Unity with C# and their JavaScript, it would enable you to export your game to both platforms, but Unity isn't free. The good news is that you can use a free version to learn, but it is missing some performance features and has an in-built ad that generates no revenue for you. If you want to break from the free version limitations, you'd need to pay a monthly subscription (Android and iPhone independently) or acquire the license (also separately, really expensive for an individual). It is worth mentioning that the Unity 2D systems are pretty new and I always avoid using brand new technology, I prefer waiting until I deem them as mature enough.

Also consider Gamesalad, Construc2, Stencyl, GameMaker and other similar, usually ignored, but one of these is what I probably would pick (personally) for mobile. They are cheaper than Unity, and you can make games just as fast. There is also http://enigma-dev.org/, and other open source alternatives.

 

You could also use Objective-C, and then port to Android using Apportable, but I personally recommend Unity and those cheaper tools over this any day.

A last option that comes to mind (and really not suited to any beginners) is programming in C and keeping a clean and thin interface; just a little portion of the code would need changes when moving from Android NDK to the Objective-C iOS API (or vice versa).

The only thing I wouldn't recommend is using Flash or Java, since you'd need to rewrite your game completely in order to release for iThings.


#4dejaime

Posted 22 February 2014 - 11:52 AM

The problem with programming for both iPhone and Android is that Android uses open technologies, while iPhone uses apple's own breed of C, called Objective-C, that doesn't seem to be used anywhere outside of iThings.

HTML5 is a good choice, but even though it was thought as the new programming wonder, that initial hype has gone cold over problematic and incomplete implementations on most platforms; it's taking way too long to be fully supported. Still, I guess this is just a question of time.

There is the option of using Unity with C# and their JavaScript, it would enable you to export your game to both platforms, but Unity isn't free. The good news is that you can use a free version to learn, but it is missing some performance features and has an in-built ad that generates no revenue for you. If you want to break from the free version limitations, you'd need to pay a monthly subscription (Android and iPhone independently) or acquire the license (also separately, really expensive for an individual). It is worth mentioning that the Unity 2D systems are pretty new and I always avoid using brand new technology, I prefer waiting until I deem them as mature enough.

Also consider Gamesalad, Construc2, Stencyl, GameMaker and other similar, usually ignored, but one of these is what I probably would pick (personally) for mobile. They are cheaper than Unity, and you can make games just as fast. There is also http://enigma-dev.org/, and other open source alternatives.

You could also use Objective-C, and then port to Android using Apportable, but I personally recommend Unity and GameMaker over this any day.

A last option that comes to mind (and really not suited to any beginners) is programming in C and keeping a clean and thin interface; just a little portion of the code would need changes when moving from Android NDK to the Objective-C iOS API (or vice versa).

The only thing I wouldn't recommend is using Flash or Java, since you'd need to rewrite your game completely in order to release for iThings.


#3dejaime

Posted 22 February 2014 - 11:50 AM

The problem with programming for both iPhone and Android is that Android uses open technologies, while iPhone uses apple's own breed of C, called Objective-C, that doesn't seem to be used anywhere outside of iThings.

HTML5 is a good choice, but even though it was thought as the new programming wonder, that initial hype has gone cold over problematic and incomplete implementations on most platforms; it's taking way too long to be fully supported. Still, I guess this is just a question of time.

There is the option of using Unity with C# and their JavaScript, it would enable you to export your game to both platforms, but Unity isn't free. The good news is that you can use a free version to learn, but it is missing some performance features and has an in-built ad that generates no revenue for you. If you want to break from the free version limitations, you'd need to pay a monthly subscription (Android and iPhone independently) or acquire the license (also separately, really expensive for an individual). It is worth mentioning that the Unity 2D systems are pretty new and I always avoid using brand new technology, I prefer waiting until I deem them as mature enough.

Also consider Gamesalad, Construc2, Stencyl, GameMaker and other similar is usually ignored, but it would probably be what I'd pick (personally) for mobile. They are cheaper than Unity, and you can make games just as fast. There is also http://enigma-dev.org/, and other open source alternatives.

You could also use Objective-C, and then port to Android using Apportable, but I personally recommend Unity and GameMaker over this any day.

A last option that comes to mind (and really not suited to any beginners) is programming in C and keeping a clean and thin interface; just a little portion of the code would need changes when moving from Android NDK to the Objective-C iOS API (or vice versa).

The only thing I wouldn't recommend is using Flash or Java, since you'd need to rewrite your game completely in order to release for iThings.


#2dejaime

Posted 22 February 2014 - 11:47 AM

The problem with programming for both iPhone and Android is that Android uses open technologies, while iPhone uses apple's own breed of C, called Objective-C, that doesn't seem to be used anywhere outside of iThings.

HTML5 is a good choice, but even though it was thought as the new programming wonder, that initial hype has gone cold over problematic and incomplete implementations on most platforms; it's taking way too long to be fully supported. Still, I guess this is just a question of time.

There is the option of using Unity with C# and their JavaScript, it would enable you to export your game to both platforms, but Unity isn't free. The good news is that you can use a free version to learn, but it is missing some performance features and has an in-built ad that generates no revenue for you. If you want to break from the free version limitations, you'd need to pay a monthly subscription (Android and iPhone independently) or acquire the license (also separately, really expensive for an individual). It is worth mentioning that the Unity 2D systems are pretty new and I always avoid using brand new technology, I prefer waiting until I deem them as mature enough.

GameMaker is usually ignored, but it would probably be the one I would pick (personally) for mobile. It is cheaper than Unity, and you can make games just as fast with it. There is also http://enigma-dev.org/, an open source alternative to it.

 

Also consider Gamesalad.com , I guess it is the cheapest professional quality tool you'll find.

You could also use Objective-C, and then port to Android using Apportable, but I personally recommend Unity and GameMaker over this any day.

A last option that comes to mind (and really not suited to any beginners) is programming in C and keeping a clean and thin interface; just a little portion of the code would need changes when moving from Android NDK to the Objective-C iOS API (or vice versa).

The only thing I wouldn't recommend is using Flash or Java, since you'd need to rewrite your game completely in order to release for iThings.


#1dejaime

Posted 22 February 2014 - 11:38 AM

The problem with programming for both iPhone and Android is that Android uses open technologies, while iPhone uses apple's own breed of C, called Objective-C, that doesn't seem to be used anywhere outside of iThings.

HTML5 is a good choice, but even though it was thought as the new programming wonder, that initial hype has gone cold over problematic and incomplete implementations on most platforms; it's taking way too long to be fully supported. Still, I guess this is just a question of time.

There is the option of using Unity with C# and their JavaScript, it would enable you to export your game to both platforms, but Unity isn't free. The good news is that you can use a free version to learn, but it is missing some performance features and has an in-built ad that generates no revenue for you. If you want to break from the free version limitations, you'd need to pay a monthly subscription (Android and iPhone independently) or acquire the license (also separately, really expensive for an individual). It is worth mentioning that the Unity 2D systems are pretty new and I always avoid using brand new technology, I prefer waiting until I deem them as mature enough.

GameMaker is usually ignored, but it would probably be the one I would pick (personally) for mobile. It is cheaper than Unity, and you can make games just as fast with it. There is also http://enigma-dev.org/, an open source alternative to it.

You could also use Objective-C, and then port to Android using Apportable, but I personally recommend Unity and GameMaker over this any day.

A last option that comes to mind (and really not suited to any beginners) is programming in C and keeping a clean and thin interface; just a little portion of the code would need changes when moving from Android NDK to the Objective-C iOS API (or vice versa).

The only thing I wouldn't recommend is using Flash or Java, since you'd need to rewrite your game completely in order to release for iThings.


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