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#ActualSteveDeFact0

Posted 22 April 2014 - 12:22 AM

 

 

So I saw that movie, "Indie Game: The Movie" last night, and I really couldn't get that emotional over it. I mean, I am not as in to games as these people were in this movie. And I am wondering if it takes that type of desperation to want to keep a job in this industry. 

 

Dude said if he does not release this game, he will kill himself. Uh....

 

I mean, there are so many developers who are not as successful, do they actually end up killing themselves? 

 

Other guy, after they had succeeded greatly said, "I am starting to think it was worth it." 

 

If anything it makes me be more considerate of how I respond to another person's work, because I don't know all the labor that was put into it. But there is no way I can play all of the indie games out there enough to get sentimental about each and every one. 

 

Everyone has a story to tell, and each person is unique, but there are millions of peoples with stories to tell, and I am sure each one is unique. What makes one stand out over another

 

This is an important topic, for beginners and experienced devs alike. 

 

Anyone have/had similar experiences in the indie game development world?

Yes, I did watch it. There was a time when I was like those people and considered it either do or die. I made insane progress in a very short period of time. I placed everything else in my life on the back burner. Then I started going to college and just didn't care anymore. Now I am making almost no progress other than mindlessly doing school work but I am not crazy anymore. So their insanity is probably the reason they were successful.

 

One thing to be mindful of is that 90% of a commercial-ready product is content, polish, and tuning. Often times, the core of what you hope for can be achieved with relatively little investment of time and resources. Blow created the core of Braid's mechanics and workings in a weekend or two, and its recognizable as such even with incredibly rough graphics. That's why we have that joke about being 90% finished, and now we just have to finish the other 90%.

 

When a project appears to be moving very slowly WRT to features and such, its often a symptom of production being unnecessarily bottlenecked on aesthetics, either as a result of a direct dependency, or as a motivational issue. Or, the project is mature, all major features exist in their essential form, and they're in the tuning stage where progress is less apparent.

 

My problem is that my attention is hard to shift once I get started on something. I can't casually work on anything. Once I get started I forget about all other things I have to do. If I decide to fix some minor bug then the next thing I know it is 6am and some paper I completely forgot about was due at mid night the day before. I've found that the only way I can get through college is by always being your standard lazy college senior who doesn't give a fuck.


#2SteveDeFact0

Posted 22 April 2014 - 12:21 AM

 

 

So I saw that movie, "Indie Game: The Movie" last night, and I really couldn't get that emotional over it. I mean, I am not as in to games as these people were in this movie. And I am wondering if it takes that type of desperation to want to keep a job in this industry. 

 

Dude said if he does not release this game, he will kill himself. Uh....

 

I mean, there are so many developers who are not as successful, do they actually end up killing themselves? 

 

Other guy, after they had succeeded greatly said, "I am starting to think it was worth it." 

 

If anything it makes me be more considerate of how I respond to another person's work, because I don't know all the labor that was put into it. But there is no way I can play all of the indie games out there enough to get sentimental about each and every one. 

 

Everyone has a story to tell, and each person is unique, but there are millions of peoples with stories to tell, and I am sure each one is unique. What makes one stand out over another

 

This is an important topic, for beginners and experienced devs alike. 

 

Anyone have/had similar experiences in the indie game development world?

Yes, I did watch it. There was a time when I was like those people and considered it either do or die. I made insane progress in a very short period of time. I placed everything else in my life on the back burner. Then I started going to college and just didn't care anymore. Now I am making almost no progress other than mindlessly doing school work but I am not crazy anymore. So their insanity is probably the reason they were successful.

 

One thing to be mindful of is that 90% of a commercial-ready product is content, polish, and tuning. Often times, the core of what you hope for can be achieved with relatively little investment of time and resources. Blow created the core of Braid's mechanics and workings in a weekend or two, and its recognizable as such even with incredibly rough graphics. That's why we have that joke about being 90% finished, and now we just have to finish the other 90%.

 

When a project appears to be moving very slowly WRT to features and such, its often a symptom of production being unnecessarily bottlenecked on aesthetics, either as a result of a direct dependency, or as a motivational issue. Or, the project is mature, all major features exist in their essential form, and they're in the tuning stage where progress is less apparent.

 

My problem is that my attention is hard to shift once I get started on something. I can't casually work on anything. Once I get started I forget about all other things I have to do. If I decide to fix some minor bug then the next thing I know it is 6am and some paper I completely forgot about was due as mid night the day before. I've found that the only way I can get through college is by always being your standard lazy college senior who doesn't give a fuck.


#1SteveDeFact0

Posted 22 April 2014 - 12:20 AM

 

 

So I saw that movie, "Indie Game: The Movie" last night, and I really couldn't get that emotional over it. I mean, I am not as in to games as these people were in this movie. And I am wondering if it takes that type of desperation to want to keep a job in this industry. 

 

Dude said if he does not release this game, he will kill himself. Uh....

 

I mean, there are so many developers who are not as successful, do they actually end up killing themselves? 

 

Other guy, after they had succeeded greatly said, "I am starting to think it was worth it." 

 

If anything it makes me be more considerate of how I respond to another person's work, because I don't know all the labor that was put into it. But there is no way I can play all of the indie games out there enough to get sentimental about each and every one. 

 

Everyone has a story to tell, and each person is unique, but there are millions of peoples with stories to tell, and I am sure each one is unique. What makes one stand out over another

 

This is an important topic, for beginners and experienced devs alike. 

 

Anyone have/had similar experiences in the indie game development world?

Yes, I did watch it. There was a time when I was like those people and considered it either do or die. I made insane progress in a very short period of time. I placed everything else in my life on the back burner. Then I started going to college and just didn't care anymore. Now I am making almost no progress other than mindlessly doing school work but I am not crazy anymore. So their insanity is probably the reason they were successful.

 

One thing to be mindful of is that 90% of a commercial-ready product is content, polish, and tuning. Often times, the core of what you hope for can be achieved with relatively little investment of time and resources. Blow created the core of Braid's mechanics and workings in a weekend or two, and its recognizable as such even with incredibly rough graphics. That's why we have that joke about being 90% finished, and now we just have to finish the other 90%.

 

When a project appears to be moving very slowly WRT to features and such, its often a symptom of production being unnecessarily bottlenecked on aesthetics, either as a result of a direct dependency, or as a motivational issue. Or, the project is mature, all major features exist in their essential form, and they're in the tuning stage where progress is less apparent.

 

My problem is that my attention is hard to shift once I get started on something. I can't casulally work on anything. Once I get started I forget about all other things I have to do. If I decide to fix some minor bug then the next thing I know it is 6am and some paper I completely forgot about was due as mid night the day before. I've found that the only way I can get through college is by always being your standard lazy college senior who doesn't give a fuck.


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