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Game Development Dictionary


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  Term Name Description

Marketing

The process of convincing a gamer to buy that piece of cheap tat on the shelf. A good marketer can sell snow to Alaska. A bad marketer would have trouble selling snow in a desert. So if you find you've bought a dud game, criticize everyone but the marketing team: they're *paid* to make you buy these things.

Publishing Deal

A deal that is made, usually at first for funding, between a development company and a publisher. The developer will often get a royalty percentage of the net profit on the game once it is sold, minus their advance.

License

A right given to use a brandname or theme from another company for a game. For instance many movies have been licensed for video games, such as Goldeneye.

Price Point

A term used to classify a product in a price range.

Licensing Deal

An agreement between a publisher and a developer where the developer grants the rights to distribute a game. Deals are normally exclusive and detail regions for distribution, such as North America or world wide. See Work-For-Hire.

Work-For-Hire

A deal where a publisher pays a development team to do a specific set of work and all work done is owned by the publisher. These deals are normally initiated at the publishers request for a specific product, as opposed to the developer creating a spec and getting a deal on it. See Licensing Deal.

Sell-In

Units sold to retail stores. See Sell-Through.

Third Party Developer

A developer which is not owned or run by the maker of a platform or operating system. For instance all developers besides Microsoft are third party developers for Windows. Developers for consoles need to be licensed by their console manufacturer before they are allowed to develop for the platform.

Suit

(AKA: 'Corporate Suit') Derogatory term used by front-line development staff for anyone who _has_ to wear a suit to work. Usually applies to managers, producers, accountants, company directors and anyone else who generally has little to do with either programming, graphics, audio or game design. Also applied to anyone in the company who has little or know knowledge of how computer game design and development is done. ["Joe? Heck no, he don't know jack 'bout programming; he's just a Suit! We gotta kowtow to him, 'cuz he's the guy who pays us."]


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