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Hybrid TCP


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#1 DayTripper   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 31 March 2000 - 06:40 AM

Is there some way I can force winsock to ignore the TCP standard that all packets be received in order? I would like to take advantage of TCP''s small header size w\o uzing the guaranteed in-order delivery. Thanks

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#2 SiCrane   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9675

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Posted 31 March 2000 - 06:59 AM

If you don''t want the guaranteed in-order delivery, then don''t you just want UDP? Or do you want TCP without in-order but guaranteed delivery? You can''t get it to work like that. Best you can do is use UDP and implement your own packet checking system. (And TCP has a huge header size at least compared to UDP.)

#3 DrJohnB   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 31 March 2000 - 07:18 AM

SiCrane, I think he wants the compression of TCP, but the more gaming appropriate ''send and forget'' style of delivery UDP offer.

DayTripper, there is no header compression for UDP yet, but I remember reading someone that a company was working on it. I think it was Valve?


#4 DavidRM   Members   -  Reputation: 270

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Posted 31 March 2000 - 07:19 AM

TCP includes in-order delivery as part of its definition. It cannot be disabled.

To respond to SiCrane: TCP''s header is larger than UPD''s, but the TCP header is compressed during transmission, while the UDP header is not. How much that affects your overhead depends on how many individual transmissions you make.



DavidRM
Samu Games


#5 SiCrane   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9675

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Posted 01 April 2000 - 05:42 AM

TCP header compression can only be done over a SLIP or PPP connection. It''s decompressed after it leaves that datalink. Even the best compression I''ve seen in comparison with UDP is only two bytes shorter per packet.




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