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Fighting Game A.I.


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#1 DirectorX   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 16 May 2003 - 04:44 PM

Hello, Can anyone provide information regarding obtaining source code or some reference on 3D fighting games A.I. ? Have anyone in here ever developed an A.I. system for a fighting game ? Thanks DirectorX ICQ#175747591

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#2 Russell   Members   -  Reputation: 118

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Posted 19 May 2003 - 01:42 PM

I wanted to make a fighting game with AI a long time ago, but never did. My best guess at how the AI works is that it uses some form of a finite state machine, but I don''t know anything about fighting game AI so don''t take that as gospel.

#3 capn_midnight   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1375

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Posted 21 May 2003 - 03:29 PM

as a fighter myself, I would say it''s something along the line of a finite state machine with simple pattern recognition.

When I''m fighting, I look for certain patterns. Most fighters use the same sequence of moves, and when the first move of the sequence is thrown, the next few moves are almost certain to follow. For example, a simple combo: jab+punch+kick. for most amatuer fighters, if they throw this combo once, then it is almost a certainty they will throw a kick once they have thrown a jab+punch.

also, depending on what set of combos a fighter is useing, I will adjust my timing to suit. If someone is using a lot of kicking combos, I will try to preemptively attack with hands, or block and counter with a power kick or punch, or stay out of range and counter. However, if a fighter is using more punching combos, I will fight with more kicks, trying to keep the fighter at the edge of my range.

Now, disregarding the opponent completely, I have certain techniques that I like to use. For some people its hands. They should generally fight more aggressively, beginning combonations with kicks to bring them in range to use hands. For other people, it''s kicks using speed generally with very weak hands. They should also fight aggressively, but should use a variety of kicks and lay off the hands. Finally, there are people that like to use powerful kicks. The should fight more defensively, generally looking to counter-attack more often then attacking straight on. Combonations will usually start with hands and end with kicks as the fighter retreats back to a safe distance.

Technique is useless if it has no chance of hitting a target. All it does is create openings for your opponent to exploit and allows your opponent to analyze your fighting style. Attacks should only be thrown if the target is in range. The opponent may come into range, or the attacker may launch himself into range, but either way it is dangerous to throw technique that hits nothing.

some fighters have unconcious habits, like "poker faces", or "nervous ticks". in fighting they are called "telegraphs". Some fighters are bad about it. For example, I knew a guy that would wipe his nose before throwing a kick to the head. Eventually, after walking head first into it for about a month, I realised this and was able to counter. A lot of people tend to tap their foot before kicking, or bob their hand before punching. Watching for these little tells can really enhance the ability to counter.

And that''s all i care to tell you...

#4 Dauntless   Members   -  Reputation: 314

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Posted 23 May 2003 - 03:26 PM

Not all fighters follow "programmatic" responses, so I''m not sure a FSM with pattern recognition would be the only way to go. While a great many people can and do develop repetitive patterns or telegraph their moves, some are better than others about this.

Plus, what happens when you face a fighter of a style you''ve never seen before? I''ve had the privilege to have been exposed (and sometimes trained) to at least 10 different martial styles (off the top of my head, Shotokan, Wing Chun, Escrima, Judo, Aiki-jiujitsu, Hapkido, Boxing, College Wrestling, Choy Lay Fut, Baguazhang, Tai Chi and even western fencing). What''s amazing is both the similarities all martial styles have, and some really huge differences. I''ve seen first hand and have participated in fights against opponents of totally different styles. It''s funny sometimes to watch what happens when a fighter who is used to fighting against certain techniques or fighting strategies to be paired off against someone with very differnt techniques and/or strategies.

Ultimately, a fighter learns not to think, and the more mental "chatter" you have in your head (ie "ohh, he just rotated his hip...I bet a roundhouse kick is coming" or, "I''ve got to throw a feint to get him to lower his guard") the worse off you''ll be. So how does a fighter do what he does? Partially it''s autonomic "wiring" that when an attack is initiated, a certain move is initiated in response. This follows capn_midnight''s suggestion of an FSM.

However, there''s a problem with this. Once you figured out your opponent''s "wiring", he''s in trouble. I suppose you could use a GA to have the AI learn what kinds of combinations or reactions are typical of a certain style or even an individual. And then from this, use this knowledge to your advantage. A truly good fighter however doesn''t have "technique" or form anymore, and is what Bruce Lee referred to about formlessness. Indeed, Japanese martial arts often talks about "mu" which means void or emptiness, and that from this nothingness comes form. In other words, you just do what you do without sticking to a formalized way of doing something. It seems paradoxical that people train for decades in a structured and ritualized way to learn to just "do it".

There''s a story about Chang Sang Fen (the creator of Tai Chi) and how he taught a disciple. He asked this disciple to study for one year on a remote mountain top the Tai Chi forms. When the student came back after one year, Chang asked him how his training went. The student replied, "it was okay, but I feel as if I''m doing the forms wrong, some of the moves don''t feel right". Chang shook his head and told him to spend another year alone practicing the forms. Again, after a year, the student came back and was asked how his training went. This time the student apologetically replied, "I''m sorry master, but my training has become worse, I feel as if I''m doing all of my forms wrong now". Chang looked sternly at the student and told him he must practice one more year again. Finally after one year, the student could not bare to look in Chang''s eyes. When Chang asked the student how his training went the student replied with bowed head, "forgive me master, but I no longer remember the forms as you have taught me. They all feel different". At last Chang sighed then laughed, and told the student that he had made Tai Chi his own and had learned well.

The moral of the story is that techniques aren''t random at the highest level, they just don''t really have a shape or form anymore. Now, how you can represent this in a game...I don''t know. Admittedly, I''m talking master level fighting skills here that few attain, so you can probably do away with alot of this and just go with the FSM that capn suggested as it will account for the majority of fighters. I do think that FSM''s will fail when encountering a martial style that the AI has never seen before, so some kind of learning algorithm will have to be used instead.



They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Benjamin Franklin


#5 C-Junkie   Members   -  Reputation: 1099

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Posted 23 May 2003 - 03:48 PM

Chase the player when you''re healthy

Run when hurting

Attack when you can

move to where you can attack when you can''t

[ just felt like telling you something useful rather than random musings over martial arts ]

#6 DirectorX   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 23 May 2003 - 06:08 PM

From conception Fighting games have been dominated by the Japanese. The most popular in the arcades Street Fighter, Virtua Fighter, Tekken and King of Fighters are all Japanese games. There is rarely no tutorials or books available on writing A.I. for fighting games. The western hemisphere of the world have a fetish for A.I. for First Person Shooter games. Can someone please provide me with some reference on creating good A.I. for a fighting game.

Thanks
Director X

#7 project_oo   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 24 May 2003 - 12:40 AM

Just to correct the Zhang San Feng story, which is in Jin Yong''s Heavenly Sword and Dragon Sabre (my translation):

The disciple in the story is Zhang Wuji (who used to be from Wudang), and he in his own right is one of the best pugilists around, but no one knew at the moment. But some people wanted to challenge the Wudang sect (where Zhang San Feng is the leader) and most of the guys in Wudang were either injured or too weak. So Zhang Sanfeng taught Wuji the Taiji-Quan (or the Fist of Tai-Chi).

After the first time he demonstrated, Wuji said, "I only remember half of it."

After the second time, Wuji said, "I cannot remember anything."

And that was when he mastered it.

#8 uncutno   Members   -  Reputation: 146

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Posted 24 May 2003 - 01:03 AM

I would go with the finite state machine with simple pattern recognition!

Make a table with all posibilities (should not be that many (since you controle it with the keyboard)).
(with a posibility i mean:
ex:
1: in range for kick/not in range for punch/oponent is blocking
)
Then give the AI the same controles as the human player.

Now you could make an A.I. recorder, witch look at you playing another person, finds witch posibilitie you are in, and record your action....
if (close_enough_to_kick && oponent_dont_block_kick) kick :-)
There should be more then 5 options on each posibility, and they should be rated on how well they did.

You should not create the perfect fighter! (that would be booring to always loose, the human player is always slower, and smarter)

Now when you have the big table of all the fighting posibilities, and all data is stored, you can start to create personalities!
feks:
a kicker: ( lower the rate on all punches)
a boss: ( remove all with rates below this and that )

Now in the game, find out what situation the player is in, find what action that are good... choose action (randomly or patterned) do action.

to make it bether, you can mark every action(in a psiibility) with a timer!
if the action was bad, mark it -10, and the AI will not do it for some time ( ten seconds... ??? )
if the action was bad, mark it +10, witch means that this move works realy good!

hope i helped, and that my englis is not to bad!

[edited by - uncutno on May 24, 2003 8:06:29 AM]

#9 capn_midnight   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1375

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Posted 24 May 2003 - 06:58 AM

I would have to disagree with the idea that fighters become totally confused when facing a style they have no experience with. Or, atleast it depends on the particular style the person studies.

My school competed in a large tournament about a year ago. We study Tae Kwon Do (or rather, our masters art which is based on Tae Kwon Do). There was a Kung Fu school represented at the tournament with a lot of students. The most Kung Fu we have ever seen has been from Hong Kong action flicks. I didn''t get to fight any of them, but some of our other students did. These Kung Fu stylists were fooling everyone else at the tournament, except our students. They would try these Crane stances, and Tiger stances, and generally strange things. (in our expeirence, we''re used to fighters staying level with both feet on the ground). But, our students destroyed them, and I think it was because we haven''t been taught "Use this technique versus this technique", or "when your oppenent throws a reverse punch, you throw this kick", we''ve been taught, "When your opponent creates this OPENING, use this technique". For us, our fighting is completely independent of our opponents style. We study human nature as well, ie. if I flick a punch in someones face, or fake a kick, and they flinch, they are fairly certain to do it again. Humans are creatures of habit. Even the greatest fighters have their habits. Bill "Superfoot" Wallace, WPK Undefeated Champion, retired at 20 consecutive wins with 11 KO''s, beating nearly everyone with a hook kick. Everyone knew what he was doing, he was too fast for you to stop it.

Anyway, fighting should be independent of style. There isn''t that much difference between styles anyway (except for stance, and that''s just an illusion). A punch HAS to have a starting and ending point, it HAS to have a target, and it always opens the body up for a counter. It doesn''t matter if it''s a Kung Fu punch or a Karate punch or a Boxing punch. There are only just so many ways to start and end a particular technique.

For example, three kicks, the rising kicking, the round kick, and the cut kick. The only difference between these kicks are the starting and end point. Rising Kick starts low and ends high.
Round Kick stays level. Cut kick starts high and ends low. All three kicks are basically the same otherwise, they both contact with the same part of the foot, both follow right to left (or left to right, depending on which foot you use), both use manly the lower leg.

#10 Flarelocke   Members   -  Reputation: 410

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Posted 24 May 2003 - 12:34 PM

quote:
There was a Kung Fu school represented at the tournament with a lot of students. The most Kung Fu we have ever seen has been from Hong Kong action flicks. I didn''t get to fight any of them, but some of our other students did. These Kung Fu stylists were fooling everyone else at the tournament, except our students. They would try these Crane stances, and Tiger stances, and generally strange things. (in our expeirence, we''re used to fighters staying level with both feet on the ground). But, our students destroyed them, and I think it was because we haven''t been taught "Use this technique versus this technique", or "when your oppenent throws a reverse punch, you throw this kick", we''ve been taught, "When your opponent creates this OPENING, use this technique". For us, our fighting is completely independent of our opponents style. We study human nature as well, ie. if I flick a punch in someones face, or fake a kick, and they flinch, they are fairly certain to do it again
Don''t kid yourself. You beat them because they sucked. A better fighter would know that he fliches, and incorporate that into his style. I pull my face back when you feint a punch? Great, use an inverted knifehand or ridgehand with your front hand to siphon the power of your retreating body into an attack.

And nobody really stands on one leg in kung fu. The reason for doing so is so you can feint a kick or lift your foot up to avoid sweeps that are too short or kicks to the shin or ankle, and still throw really nasty attacks without needing to set your foot down. The moving up and down stuff is for fighting people who have fallen down (and are probably trying to get up), or dodging. (or just fighting really short people) At the advanced levels, you fall and rise with your falling and rising attacks to increase the power.

Giving yourself a new "nature" isn''t that tough, either. I''ve only been studying jujutsu for two years, and I''ve already stopped resisting pushes to my body almost completely.

For the record, crane and tiger are easy, and relatively similar to tae kwon do. Come back when you''ve fought against someone good at preying mantis or monkey.

quote:
Anyway, fighting should be independent of style. There isn''t that much difference between styles anyway (except for stance, and that''s just an illusion). A punch HAS to have a starting and ending point, it HAS to have a target, and it always opens the body up for a counter. It doesn''t matter if it''s a Kung Fu punch or a Karate punch or a Boxing punch. There are only just so many ways to start and end a particular technique.

Stance is an illusion only so far as stances are evanescent. The differences between stances have strong effects on the number of techniques available to you and the power of them. Your stances also have a very strong effect on your ability to counter, move around, and dodge.

Anyway, there are two categories of martial arts, one of which invalidates your statement that fighting is independent of style. There are striking and grappling arts. The older a martial art is, the more likely it is to straddle the boundary. If you were to fight an aikido expert, you would find yourself completely confused. There may be little difference between a kung fu punch and a karate punch, but there''s a hell of a difference between a kung fu punch and an aikido punch, considering that there''s no punches in aikido (correct me if I''m wrong about that). It''s not a deficiency, not a blind spot, it''s a style.

quote:
Even the greatest fighters have their habits. Bill "Superfoot" Wallace, WPK Undefeated Champion, retired at 20 consecutive wins with 11 KO''s, beating nearly everyone with a hook kick. Everyone knew what he was doing, he was too fast for you to stop it.
I don''t know the specifics of the WPK (google finds nothing), but I''ve heard in Tae Kwon Do tournaments, it''s against the rules to punch the kidneys. In most tournaments, it''s against the rules to aim for the groin. In tournaments for striking arts, throwing is either not allowed or strongly discouraged (and certainly not taught). Without any of these options, a spinning hook kick is mostly unstoppable. Even if you counter, you still get kicked really hard.

The trivial method of stopping a hook kick, without these restrictions, is to tackle your opponent. Almost regardless of the point in the attack when you realize your opponent''s attack, a tackle mitigates or avoids the damage. A spinning hook kick is useless at close range, and if you put your head on the opposite side from the kick, the only available target is your shoulder, which can take extreme amounts of punishment without being damaged.

Back on topic:
The finite state machine is definately the way to go. At the broadest level, there are two states -- free to move and not free to move. Beyond "free to move", there''s states that correspond to the different distances from your opponent: too far to matter, jump kick distance, kicking distance, punching distance, knee/elbow distance, trapping distance (real fighting games never seem to get to the last two). If you''re too far to matter, move in. If you''re in jump kick distance, move in. If you''re in kicking distance, choose the fastest move for which you are in range or the move that precipitates the most devastating combo or simply move in to punching distance. If you''re in punching distance, choose the fastest move or the move that precipitates the most devastating combo. Or, for any of the above, just wait.

To choose from one of the choices, you could vary the selections from character to character, or you could use the history of the character to choose. If the player frequently uses slow, devastating attacks, the AI should wait, then block, then counter. At a design level, you need only select "wait" as your action and let the "wait" command block and counter, rather than add states like "incoming attack" for which the action is to block.

#11 capn_midnight   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1375

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Posted 24 May 2003 - 06:26 PM

I don't think we were ever talking about a "realistic self defense style simulation". Certainly grappling is different from striking, it was my assumption we were talking about the striking arts only. I don't care how effective a grappler you are, it still makes for a pretty boring game (oh look, I've had my face stuck in my partners ass for the last 15 minutes!).
In terms of striking arts, there is no difference in technique. As soon as you realize this, you will advance beyond the short-sighted approach that most martial artists have of the belief that their art is superior to all others.

And no, I would not be totally confused by an Aikido master. I've seen them in action, I know the technique they are using, I know the physics behind it. Certainly _I_ would not be able to beat an Aikido master, as I have only recently earned my first degree a year ago. However, I am confident that I could give a student with similar experience as I a good fight. This is not because of arrogance, this comes from the knowledge that there are no "Mystical" arts, and anything that my sparring partner does to me can be stopped, someway, somehow. There is no end-all, ultimate move that trumps everything. All it takes is time and perserverence.

Once again, I want to point out, THERE ARE NO MYSTICAL ARTS! THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS KI/CHI! It's all simple physics (simple, in that it involves Newtonian Physics, not Quantum or otherwise). Even Bruce Lee's one-inch punch can be explained by physics (pure acceleration power. Master Lee was able to accelerate his fist to the appropriate speed over the short distance of one inch. However, when you study the forces necessary to create such an acceleration, you will realize this is not an impossible or magical task. Even Master Lee admitted everything he did had no basis in the mystical).

There are only a few basic stances. 1) Facing your opponent 2) Standing sideways to your opponent, and 3) back to your opponent. Anything else is just a feint, just an illusion to try to trick the opponent into thinking something big is coming.

Finally, grappling arts are not inherently superior to striking arts. I used to know some amazing Combat Sambo practitioners, and the only reason why my kicks would not work against them was because of their conditioning, an element completely seperate from their grappling training. A striker with such conditioning would be an amazing thing (oh, wait, there is such a thing, a WESTERN BOXER!). Constantly, I would land kicks that would crush a normal man on them well before they could get a hold of me and squeeze the air out of me. The point is, their "ART" was not superior to mine becuase of technique. They were superior "FIGHTERS" because they had effectively elliminated all of my weapons.

Now, I think some fighters take the dangerous approach of believing they can suck it up and take a hit to allow themselves to be in position to counter attack. I don't believe in blocking powerful technique. I much prefer to evade and counter, or even jam attack. With a jam attack you must have fairly fast reflexes. When you see a powerful (and consequently slow) technique coming, you throw your most powerful technique that can land before the incoming attack connects with YOU. In doing this, you throw your opponent off balance. In some cases, this can be my only defense against much larger opponents (I'm only 5'8", 150lb and usually fight 6' 225lb guys. 75lbs is a large margin to make up).

In short, fighting is independent of style. ALL striking arts are essentially equivalent, with the exception of the illusion of different stances. All arts use the same basic stances, modifying them to look different. Confusion plays a large role in fighting, a fighter that is thinking is not fighting. Human nature plays an equally large role in fighting, a fighter can be relied on to have SOME kind of habit. This is the problem with AI fighters, they have no habits, making them almost perfect. Sometimes it is better to attack quickly rather than block. Sometimes it's better to jump out of the way rather than block. Conditioning the body to withstand powerful hits can makeup for most (but not all) lack of technique.

[edited by - capn_midnight on May 25, 2003 1:38:34 AM]

#12 Flarelocke   Members   -  Reputation: 410

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Posted 24 May 2003 - 08:54 PM

quote:
Certainly grappling is different from striking, it was my assumption we were talking about the striking arts only. I don''t care how effective a grappler you are, it still makes for a pretty boring game (oh look, I''ve had my face stuck in my partners ass for the last 15 minutes!).
True enough, but the intermediates make for excellent entertainment. Enter the Matrix, for example, uses aikido-like moves for some of its disarmament techniques and jujutsu moves for some of its counters.

quote:
Certainly _I_ would not be able to beat an Aikido master, as I have only recently earned my first degree a year ago. However, I am confident that I could give a student with similar experience as I a good fight.
I''m inclined to agree, but I think that as time goes on, if both you and your hypothetical aikido practicing opponent continue practicing, it will become less and less true.

quote:
This is not because of arrogance, this comes from the knowledge that there are no "Mystical" arts, and anything that my sparring partner does to me can be stopped, someway, somehow. There is no end-all, ultimate move that trumps everything. All it takes is time and perserverence.
Sure there is: convincing your mother to have an abortion before you''re ever born. But that would take some crazy-ass mastery

quote:
Once again, I want to point out, THERE ARE NO MYSTICAL ARTS! THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS KI/CHI!
Preaching to the choir, here. It''s a useful illusion for some purposes, however. Tell someone to hold their bent arm still, and a single stronger person can pull their arm straight. Tell them to infuse their arm with ki, and it takes a truck to straighten it.

quote:
It''s all simple physics (simple, in that it involves Newtonian Physics, not Quantum or otherwise). Even Bruce Lee''s one-inch punch can be explained by physics (pure acceleration power. Master Lee was able to accelerate his fist to the appropriate speed over the short distance of one inch. However, when you study the forces necessary to create such an acceleration, you will realize this is not an impossible or magical task. Even Master Lee admitted everything he did had no basis in the mystical).
If it were impossible, then he wouldn''t be able to do it. If it were magical and he could nevertheless do it consistently, the scientific method would at some point explain it, thus proving it is not magical.

Knowing that it''s explained by physics doesn''t really do anything for you, though. If the physics were inaccurate, the experience would still be the same.

quote:
There are only a few basic stances. 1) Facing your opponent 2) Standing sideways to your opponent, and 3) back to your opponent. Anything else is just a feint, just an illusion to try to trick the opponent into thinking something big is coming.
Yeah. So what? Knowing that there are mammals and there are birds doesn''t mean there aren''t platypi.

So tell me this: how does the spread of your feet perpendicular to your opponent affect your ability to move in sparring? To what extent does reducing your profile (i.e. turning to the side to become a smaller target) become a liability? Why do most people have the weight on their back leg when they''re in a side-on stance? In what situations is it a really, really bad idea to have unevenly distributed weight? What stance should you use to thrash an opponent who is below the reach of your arms? What are the advantages and disadvantages of resting your weight on the ball of your foot vs. your heel? How does uneven or treacherous terrain affect your stance and/or movement? How do you move from one stance in one position to another stance in another position without leaving vulnerabilities?

quote:
I don''t believe in blocking powerful technique.
Of course not -- you practice Tae Kwon Do.
quote:
I much prefer to evade and counter, or even jam attack. With a jam attack you must have fairly fast reflexes. When you see a powerful (and consequently slow) technique coming, you throw your most powerful technique that can land before the incoming attack connects with YOU. In doing this, you throw your opponent off balance. In some cases, this can be my only defense against much larger opponents
I prefer gunting(sp?), which means attacking an attack. If you see a roundhouse, you don''t really block it, although that''s the effect; you punch the shin. (this is one reason for a vertical punch (where your knuckles are in a vertical row instead of a horizontal one). If you are just a little off, you can hurt your hand using a horizontal punch)
quote:
In short, fighting is independent of style. ALL striking arts are essentially equivalent, with the exception of the illusion of different stances. All arts use the same basic stances, modifying them to look different.
They modify them for better reasons than that. The northern foot; southern hand observation comes to mind. It''s pretty easy to see in kung fu where the styles assume that it will be difficult to move your feet freely versus being able to move and kick with wild abandon. There are also inherent differences in teaching methods among the striking arts. Jeet kune do comes to mind as an example.

quote:
This is the problem with AI fighters, they have no habits, making them almost perfect.
This is why I suggested that the choices be determined for the different characters in the fighting game. And I don''t know what kind of fighting games you''ve been playing, but I haven''t gotten the impression that the fighters have no habits. Just the really tough ones. The indian guy, the spanish guy, and the electric guy from Street Fighter 2 have remarkably different habits, to name a well-known example. If nothing else, the different available combos make for very different styles.

#13 capn_midnight   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1375

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Posted 25 May 2003 - 07:02 AM

quote:
Original post by Flarelocke
So tell me this: how does the spread of your feet perpendicular to your opponent affect your ability to move in sparring?


distance between feet is proportional to stability and inversely proportional to mobility. In other words, wide feet make you harder to knock over but harder for you to move, closer feet make you faster to move but easier to knock over.
quote:

To what extent does reducing your profile (i.e. turning to the side to become a smaller target) become a liability?


Depends on your desired technique. If you use powerful punches, you will tend to face your opponent square. To reduce your profile by turning sideways will slow your rear hand as a weapon. However, if you are kicking, you will want to turn your body sideways. Most powerful kicks are only possible from this sideways stance.
quote:
Why do most people have the weight on their back leg when they''re in a side-on stance?


To take the weight off their front leg, giving them much faster kicks with that leg. Also, it helps to reduce vulnerability to sweeps.
quote:
In what situations is it a really, really bad idea to have unevenly distributed weight?

having all your weight on your front leg makes you very vulnerable to sweeps. having all your weight on your rear leg makes you vulnerable to blitz technique if you do not use an effective counter attack.
quote:
What stance should you use to thrash an opponent who is below the reach of your arms?

I would still use the sideways stance and drop an axe kick down on my opponent. It works, I know, it was done to me during my black belt test.
quote:
What are the advantages and disadvantages of resting your weight on the ball of your foot vs. your heel?

I really can''t think of how resting on your heals would be advantageous. It makes you sluggish and unstable. In fact, if you study sport in general, you will find that ANY sport finds no advantage to "digging in your heals".
quote:

How does uneven or treacherous terrain affect your stance and/or movement?

I would think this is obvious. If it is not, it can adversly effect your balance, making kicking inordinantly more difficult. It would also, in my mind, make grappling more difficult, as you have lost the one sure constant of the ground as a point of leverage.
quote:
How do you move from one stance in one position to another stance in another position without leaving vulnerabilities?


Generally, I use an attack to switch stances. Of course, if the opponent is out of range, this isn''t necessary. Usually, sidestepping is a good way of changing stance. I would not just switch my feet, I would definitely make the change a part of something else (an attack, an evasion).

What else do you want to know?


#14 Flarelocke   Members   -  Reputation: 410

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Posted 25 May 2003 - 02:26 PM

I didn''t actually mean for you to answer all those questions. I only asked them rhetorically, as a way to demonstrate that there are considerations that cause significant variations in the stances; there are better reasons for them than just "looking different".

#15 steverino   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 28 May 2003 - 03:54 AM

You should check out the MUGEN website, i think its www.elecbyte.com

if you never heard of it, it basically a 2D fighting game "creator". Which means you can import your own 2D characters from different fighting game series such as SF, KOF etc... If you should check out some of the faq that they have, or maybe even download the demo. Its got lots and lots of FSM code for the system and characters, so it should have some sort of AI implemented too.

#16 RPGeezus   Members   -  Reputation: 216

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Posted 28 May 2003 - 07:01 AM

quote:
Original post by Flarelocke
For the record, crane and tiger are easy, and relatively similar to tae kwon do. Come back when you''ve fought against someone good at preying mantis or monkey.



I think you everyone should learn chromed Glock style!

Will

#17 vaneger   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 28 May 2003 - 03:47 PM

i would just use physics to make a finte state machine based on character position and possible moves, while taking into consideration pervious patterns. for instance if a player is doing a round house or other spinning move his momentum and balance will shift in a certain pattern, forcing certain types of movement. Therefore, you move in a way to negate the oppoennets momemtum and open up a counter attack position.

#18 themattgreen   Members   -  Reputation: 132

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Posted 29 May 2003 - 11:33 AM

[ just felt like telling you something useful rather than random musings over martial arts ]

Actually, I found the random musings alot more usefull than your comments. And I am NOT taking the piss here.

#19 BeerNutts   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2522

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Posted 30 May 2003 - 09:31 AM

I''ll put all of you in a Figure-Four leg lock and make you scream Uncle. Then I''ll stand up and tell you, "To be the Man, you gotta Beat the Man!" "WHOOOOOO!"



#20 vaneger   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 01 June 2003 - 05:35 AM

well lets see here. you could take a style and convert every kind of movement in it to a math problem and have your AI use math to choose its defenses. Or you could simplify that kind of algorithm and examine player position/stance then calculate what moves could off balance the player enough for your AI to form a combo attack. If the AI player is being attacked you look at the movement vector of the incoming attack and calculate the proper move to offset the momentum thus leaving the player vunerable to a counter attack. Or you can just have simple AI instead of using math to determine attacks.




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