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Making a new game company work


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#1 Tsutomegi   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 17 June 2000 - 07:02 AM

Is there any easy way to get (or try to get) a bunch of people to work together on a game project effectively, when they all believe that even though it''s our first game, we''re going to be at #1 on the top games of the century list, and that we''ll make at least $1 000 000 on one week''s sales... i can''t for the life of me convince them that we are all newbies to the game industry, and our first game will probably end up on freeware sites across the world because no-one in their right mind would actually buy it. we have tried this before, and instead of ctually doing any work, they were planning out what they were going to do with their million dollars... anyone have any suggestions / examples???

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#2 Tiso   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 19 June 2000 - 04:59 AM

Well, if you can''t get through to them that they''re newbies, that it''s theitr first project, and that it probably won''t be successful then I suggest leaving them. If you can''t play together and have fun, then don''t play at all. :D

Just my thoughts.

............
Guardian Angel Interactive

#3 Domini   Members   -  Reputation: 126

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Posted 19 June 2000 - 07:47 AM

Your team just sounds young and inexperienced, not that I''m all that old. If your team is going to succeed, you need dedicated people. If wanting to make a game was enough, everyone would be making games. I''ve had to kick someone out because he wasn''t dedicated enough to making the game. I''m saying this because you say your team isn''t doing any work. What skills do the people on your team have? How old? You probably won''t get much out of anyone who is under 16 or 17. There are a few people who are mature for their age, but not many.

Domini

#4 DeltaVee   Members   -  Reputation: 138

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Posted 19 June 2000 - 07:58 AM

1. Start setting some project milestones.

2. Create teams (with team leaders, give them the power to get rid of team members). Make each one responsible for a project milestone.

3. Make it clear to them that nothing is goint to happen unless they do some actual work.

4. Get rid of the person doing the least work.

5. Get rid of the Team leader with the least productive team. Break that team up and replace it with effective members from other teams.

I''ve worked with a lot of @#$holes in my life and I have come to expect very little work at the beginning of a new project. This will usually pass as the whole team comes to realize that work is required.

The larger the project the more people involved and the greater need for MATURE team leaders. I couldn''t care less about code slingers, they get weeded out before long, especially when a team is not producing.




#5 Domini   Members   -  Reputation: 126

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Posted 19 June 2000 - 08:38 AM

In the six years or so(not including the real early years) I have been learning how to program and programming games, I''ve only found 3 people who are like me willing to work hard. I was talking to the 3D artist I work with about this last week. Too many people think making games is going to be always fun. That''s so not true. The best part about game development is when you finish a particular aspect of the project, or the entire thing and your like wow, I made that.

Don''t feel any need to keep people on that are not producing. Game developers don''t need added stress. Immature lazy team members are project destroyers, but I need more specifics about your team before I can make any real suggestions.

Domini

#6 Tiso   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 19 June 2000 - 09:38 AM

I''d just like to make another small addition to this discussion, age doesn''t really matter. It''s what that person does, can do, and how he/she acts.

I know Domini means, and he''s right, but don''t take that to far. Give the younger people a chance if it looks like they''re worth it, if it doesn''t turn out the way you expected, that''s okay. Just know that you gave it a shot.

I''d hate to see someone (me especially) who has he skills and determinitation refused a position because he was a little young. My 2 arrays.

............
Guardian Angel Interactive

#7 Domini   Members   -  Reputation: 126

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Posted 19 June 2000 - 10:39 AM

I clarify a little. I''m definitely not bashing young developers. I''m only 19 myself.

Domini

#8 bernatk   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 19 June 2000 - 11:55 AM

> Is there any easy way to get a bunch of people to work together

There isn''t. If no money involved in the project, you can expect 1 dedicated person / year growing in your team. No more than that. It took me 4 years to draw 3 graphicians attention even when I have showed them some cool game seed. And after 4 years I can show off something that is commercial quality.

Rule No1. Expect as little as you can from them, but at least as much as you do. Not more, nor less.

Rule No2. Keep in touch with them face to face on at least a weekly base. I would not thought how important the personal real life contact is.

Rule No3. Don''t expect any quality work from guys under age 22-23 who had not worked after/while college. It is my experience.

Our team make games on these terms with $0.00 involved, so it can be done. It''s my $0.02.

Regards,
bernie



#9 Tiso   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 19 June 2000 - 02:11 PM

Don''t worry Domini, I wasn''t saying you were.

Ahem, I''d appreciate it if people stopped saying that you shouldn''t expect much from younger people. Even though I don''t have enough experience or knowledge to be useful, I can asure you that I would work my butt off to complete a project and I would sure as hey do my best.

I''m glad that''s out of my system.

............
Guardian Angel Interactive

#10 socks   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 19 June 2000 - 02:17 PM

There is nothing wrong with have young people on your team. They are just as capable as anyone else. Just make sure you know them and what they are like, just as you would want to know anyone else you have on your team.

If all these errors are so fatal, why am I still alive?

#11 Orpheum   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 21 June 2000 - 10:04 AM

My problem is I dont know anyone IRL who can program that isnt a flake... My other problem is that I dont know anyone on the internet who can program that isnt a flake... This is why Im doing EVERYTHING myself, and why my simple game wont be done until new year!!! ........ owell

#12 bernatk   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 21 June 2000 - 10:23 AM

Hey guys, I was not meant to offend anyone. I worked a lot when I was in that age, too. I have stated that younger people have less value added work than experienced one. What more, college and 3+ years working is very good resume to find a job. So encourage you to make games. Just don''t complain if you find it hard below 23.

Regards,
bernie



#13 DavidRM   Members   -  Reputation: 270

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Posted 21 June 2000 - 12:40 PM

My recommendation is this: Don''t start with a group and expect to get anything done.

Start with 1-2 people who are dedicated to the project. Those core member(s) are the "vision keepers" for the project. They design the game from top to bottom, and then figure out what parts they can do and which ones they will have to either outsource or find new team members to handle.

On the assumption that you are one the "core members" of the team, do the work you can. Don''t wait for the whole team to be in existence before you start working. If you do, you''ll find that you''re not getting a lot done.

For our game, Artifact, my brother and I had our initial "design meetings" in fall, 1996. From past experience (and preference), we knew that he could handle the server-side programming and I could handle the client-side issues. In addition, I took responsibility as "team leader" since the artist and sound guys (when we found ''em) would have to report to me. We didn''t find an artist (a 19 year old college student) until summer, 1997, and the sound guy didn''t show up until the middle of 1998.

If we had waited until the team was fully assembled before starting, it would''ve been a long time starting. As it was, by the time each new team member joined, we had worked out what it was we actually needed from them.

Do what you can with what you have. If you just keep plugging away at it you''ll be amazed at what you can accomplish, even on limited means.


DavidRM
Samu Games


#14 Tiso   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 June 2000 - 02:20 AM

I recently partnered up with a beginner C++ programmer and we''re working together just fine. It''s just me him, and a computer screen. We''re making alot of headway in our project that just started a few days ago. It took us about a day to decide what we wanted to do, and how we would do it. (it''s a very basic low graphic game)

With that established we dove into coding the bugger. We almost have the foundation set, once it is, we''ll be on our way.

Just like what DavidRM, start small. A mustard seed grows to become a strong, fairly large tree.

............
Guardian Angel Interactive




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