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Sound Effect Gurus


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#1 Wayfarer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 21 June 2000 - 12:12 PM

I''m creating a bunch of sounds for my game, and I would like to know how to normalize (?) all of them so they all sound consistent when playing together and over each other. Are there any programs out there that can peform a batch operation on a bunch of sounds at once or do something like this? Could someone explain how this process works? What details should I pay attention to when creating sounds that will be played together in a game? Wayfarer

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#2 baskuenen   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 21 June 2000 - 12:30 PM

You probably saw the latest tutorial here on gamedev, but because I can''t tell you much about this topic but want to try and help - here''s the link: Writing Game Music : Part II



#3 Kaspian   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 21 June 2000 - 04:08 PM

Sound Forge might do the trick, that program is supposed to be good for batching, just that it costs a fair bit.

#4 cyberben   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 21 June 2000 - 04:23 PM

If you have the equipment, you should use a compressor when you record them... but it sounds to late to do that now for you. So yah, look around..... (If your still recording use a compressor, then it''ll all be done for you! :-)
- Ben

#5 Wayfarer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 June 2000 - 10:30 AM

I''m sorry to say the gamedev music article didn''t help much, since
it was mostly about creating midi music, not about sounds in general.

What I have is a bunch of sound effects, like weapons firing,
explosions, etc. all in WAV format. Most of these sounds were
created by me directly with a sound program that can generate
different kinds of waves and other cool stuff. I didn''t actually
do any recording with a mic, so I guess I don''t need a compressor.

All my sounds have different volume levels, and when they''re playing,
they don''t seem consistent. Some are too loud, some are too quiet,
and some have too much noise going on. And when a lot of them start
playing at once, they saturate to static.

Do the game pros treat digitally created sounds any different than
analog created sounds?


Wayfarer

#6 pacman   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 June 2000 - 10:46 AM

Hey Wayfarer, what sound program do you use? That sounds really cool.

initiates shouldn't have signatures.

#7 Kaspian   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 June 2000 - 05:18 PM

Yeah, it looks like the easiest thing to try is Sound Forge or some other sound editor with good batching abilities. That way you should be able to get them around the same volume, and take care of the overflow. I''m gonna be looking at doing this within the next month or so, so I guess I''ll be learning by doing.

As far as your question about analogue vs digital creation is concerned, I''d imagine they''re prime concerns is sound quality and realism. Sound Designers will often just mic something up to grab a sound just so they don''t have to spend two hours sifting through their libraries, when slamming a door and grabbing the sound does the same thing :D .

#8 Self_Afflicted   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 June 2000 - 06:25 PM

There are loads of ways to normalise sounds. The easiest and most effective way is to use a decent sound editor. Personally, I use Sound Forge but I''m pretty sure that most others have the same ability. All you have to do is click on the normalise button and tell the program what you want the average peak value to be.

If you''ve got an audio editor but it hasn''t got a normalise option then you can due it manually. Basically, you want the peaks on all the sounds to be the same height. If you set yourself an amplitude that you want them to reach and then work out how much you are going to have to increase them to (or reduce them by) you can do it using only a volume option.

If you haven''t got an audio editor then download a freeware one from the net.

If you have any other queries fel free to e-mail me at

selfafflicted@netscapeonline.co.uk

P.S. I''m not a Pro but as far digital vs. analog goes it shouldn''t make a difference. Provided all the sounds are of the same quality then who cares how they were created?

#9 Wayfarer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 June 2000 - 07:09 PM

pacman,

I''ve been downloading a bunch of shareware and freeware sound programs
from a site called www.sonicspot.com. There''s one program called Goldwave
(www.goldwave.com) that has something called an expression evaluator.
You can basically type in any mathematical expression (sin,cos,sqrt,rand,
etc.) and it creates the sound for you. Other sound programs might have
something like this, but I just happen to come across this one first.

They have a bunch of presets already made if you don''t really know how
to create a complicated sound. Here''s one. Can you even guess what
this sounds like:

sin(2*pi*t*725)*exp(-t*5)*(1-exp(-t*30))+(step(t-5)-step(t-.3))*
sin(2*pi*(t-.3)*565)*1.3*exp(-(t-.3)*5)*(1-exp(-(t-.3)*30))

[answer in reverse: llebrood a s''ti

But that''s just the beginning. You can flange it, throw it echo,
random noise, doppler effects, etc.. lots of way to get an original sound.

Oh, and I didn''t even notice it, it can normalize sounds. I just
found out today.


Wayfarer

#10 Wayfarer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 23 June 2000 - 11:46 AM


Hey, I wouldn''t mind seeing an article on the mathematics of sound
on Gamedev. My calculus is a bit rusty.


Wayfarer


#11 baskuenen   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 23 June 2000 - 11:54 AM

Some time ago, I tried to write my own software synthesizer using sin/cos/exp and other functions. At the moment I believe it may be best to use a "filter-approach-calculation".
Have you checked out "Generator"? You can build your own synth with building blocks like:
  • Sin generator
  • Lots of filters
  • Midi support
  • ...

  • Even a decent 303 emulator can be build



    Edited by - baskuenen on June 23, 2000 6:55:01 PM

    #12 Wayfarer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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    Posted 23 June 2000 - 09:30 PM

    I haven''t used that one before, but for creating music, I got this
    tracking program called Buzz. It was absolutely hard as hell to learn,
    because it has terrible docs and a terrible GUI, but it makes some pretty
    unique sounds when you understand how to use it. You can dynamically
    string together a bunch of generator and effect machines like building
    blocks (input-to-output) and see what it sounds like.


    Wayfarer


    #13 baskuenen   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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    Posted 24 June 2000 - 03:43 AM

    Generator: www.nativeinstruments.com

    This generator is almost the same as Buzz, only you need a midi sequencer like CuBase orso.
    With generator you can build your machines YOURSELF You might find this very interresting considering your previous posts...



    #14 Wayfarer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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    Posted 24 June 2000 - 10:42 AM

    Hmmm, they must have renamed Generator to Reaktor because I can''t find
    it on their website.

    I used to like doing MIDI sequencing, but I never really created anything
    that sounded good by myself. But then I recently got into tracking, and
    that just blew everything else away. I downloaded a whole library of
    808 and 909 wav samples and just went crazy with it ever since.

    If you can convince me that MIDI sequencing is better than tracking,
    then I might take another look.


    Wayfarer


    #15 Colin Barry   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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    Posted 28 June 2000 - 10:32 PM

    I do believe that Native Instruments have all but abandoned Generator now in favour of Reaktor. Reaktor is basically Generator ''with extras'' such as granular synthesis. You won''t make a realistic 303, the filters are IMHO awful. If you want 303, get Rebirth. Reaktor is also a CPU hog - if you want more than a few notes of polyphony than you are going to struggle to sync it to Cubase in real time. The coolest thing about Reaktor is that you can use it to model your own DirectX plugins. Nice ...

    Someone has made a freeware ( at least it was free last time I looked ) version of Generator called SynC Modular. It does more or less everything Generator can do, and seems to be slightly less crash prone. http://www.mtu-net.ru/syncmodular/

    MIDI is better than tracking if you can afford the equipment - a decent sound card at the minimum but preferably some decent sound modules ( the Roland JV-1080 has excellent sounds, is fully programmable, has great upgrade options and is cheap.) MIDI gives you a LOT more control and is a better abstraction for written music than MOD''s. However, if all you have is a cheapy soundblaster with its plinky FM instruments than stick with tracking and a decent sample lib.

    #16 Wayfarer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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    Posted 29 June 2000 - 09:43 AM

    I tried Rebirth out for a while, and liked some of its features, but a
    couple of things just turned me off. The GUI is so cramped together with
    tiny controls, I felt like I needed a zoom-in feature to isolate the machine
    I wanted to work on. And with my monitor at 800x600, the program window was
    too huge for my screen. I really don''t like using a screen resolution larger
    than that. And you can''t display your song in some kind of spreadsheet form.
    This I really don''t like because you can''t see all the patterns you are using
    at once, i.e. the big picture.


    Wayfarer


    #17 Colin Barry   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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    Posted 29 June 2000 - 09:47 PM

    Besides which you end up breaking your wrist trying to rotate the controllers in real-time with the mouse. *ugh* Shame they saw fit to emulate the look of a 303 instead of doing a nice computer friendly GUI. Song editing is such a swine too - let''s hope they rectify all these mistakes when Reason comes out.

    #18 Marcuz   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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    Posted 01 July 2000 - 12:49 AM

    Hello,

    I just want to say that the module format is underestimated.
    One of the reasons is that it is easier to leanr how to make MIDI''s than MODs, since MODs have so so many effects and stuff that you can use, and often when someone tries out making module music, he/she gets tired of it quickly because it seems too strange and hard to learn. It takes years to fully master making modules...to learn the effects, trix etc etc etc.

    I started making MODs years ago and I wan to show you that module music does *not* belong to the past. The old .mod format does but not the .XM .IT .S3M etc.

    Listen to the songs here: www.mp3.com/marcuz
    and tell me if you can hear that this is made in .XM format. It sounds just as good as CD.

    Have a nice day!




    / Marcus Knudsen /MDM

    Game music composer

    www.mp3.com/marcuz

    --------------------------/

    #19 Colin Barry   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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    Posted 02 July 2000 - 09:11 PM

    And, as we all know that great music for Unreal, Unreal Tournament and Deus Ex was all MODs.

    #20 Marcuz   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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    Posted 02 July 2000 - 10:45 PM

    Yes, exactly

    But... Deus ex...is that released yet?

    /Marcuz




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