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Need Advice


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#1 jtecin   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 10:54 AM

Okay, I have this great idea(yeah, yeah, I know, great ideas come a dime a dozen). But seriously, this one is totally different from anything done before, more than a different genre, a whole new way of thinking about computer games. Now, since this idea would sound lame if I tried to explain it to a publisher, I am making the engine for it as we speak. Unfortunately, believe it or not, I don''t have the same resources as huge companies to compete with them. Heck, I don''t have half the programming skills that some of those microsoft and blizzard guys have. Still, I''m giving making this game a try (I''ve made games before, so I''m not a newbie, but I''m not a professional game programmer by all means as I have not sold a game). My question is, should I release the game and give information about it as soon as I get a decent demo? I mean, I''m afraid of one of the big guys copying this idea, and then selling a million copies before I release the actual game (A little exageration). Not copying the game persay, but rather the genre or whatever the game creates. I could wait until I get real good at programming and modeling before releasing the game, but it is the most fun in multiplayer, and I''m kinda looking forward to playing the game multiplayer! Hmmmm, I guess I did want to be a game programmer for the fun of it, and make an impact on the gaming industry, so even if I don''t get credit or money for it, it''ll still be fun. I guess I know what I have to do. The website I hope will be up soon. Later all, thanks for listening to me ramble. Oh, and if you see blizzard, sierra, microsoft, or some other company selling a game with this idea, remember I thought of it first!

Sponsor:

#2 daring[MAN]   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 01:07 PM

I wouldn''t bother sending any game company your idea. If you send it cold, most won''t even look at it for fear of causing a lawsuit down the line. ((I''ve seen it happen before)) Many companies get unsolicited game ideas, only to file-13 them out of hand.

I don''t want to bum you out, but most companies (expecially larger one''s) have a TON of ideas/concepts/prototypes on file already. You''d have to get some sort of NDA if you are worried about a company stealing your idea.

If your idea is truly "totally different" then work on it yourself, put together a business proposal and try to approach someone for development capital. Good ideas are indeed a dime a dozen, but if you can implement this idea well, and get it out under your control, you''ll get the most out of it.

I don''t envy. In fact I''m inclined to wonder.

#3 AtypicalAlex   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 03:28 PM

Hm, well, chances are that someone, somewhere actually HAS thought up what you have thought up ... just slightly differently. Completely new ideas are very, very rare in any form of media.

Now then, as the previous poster mentioned, most game companies won''t give you a second of their time. Especially if you, Joe Shmoe (no insult to you ... what I mean by that is that you have no "professional" history in the industry), pitch some major company a game idea they''ll just blow you off.

But if you work really hard and present it PROFESSIONALLY to a SMALLER publisher, you may get enough resources to at least impress some people. Then you''ll get more money to go farther. However, this is rare, and it has to be a REALLY good idea that you can prove will bring said publisher lots and lots of money.

My second point: One of the biggest downfalls of amateur designers is that they think everyone is out to steal their ideas. Truth is, NO ONE is out to steal your ideas. GT Interactive isn''t going to throw you from their office and then make a game based on what you just pitched them. If they threw you out, they didn''t like the idea. End of story, they''re not looking to cheat you. After all, if your the one that thought of it, wouldn''t they want YOU to be the one to see it through, since your the visionary and all...

Anyway, that''s about all I can say to you. Aim low and you won''t be disappointed. Once you''re further along then you can shoot the moon. And DON''T be paranoid. That won''t get you anywhere at all.

HTH

------------------------------
Changing the face of adventure gaming...
Atypical Interactive

#4 jtecin   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 05:37 PM

Ummm, I think you guys might have missed the essence of my post. I ended up deciding I would just create the game to the best of my ability, I didn''t think that sounded like I was aiming that high. Also, thinking that companies won''t steal ideas is being pretty naive. I''m not being paranoid, but let''s face it, Microsoft became huge by stealing ideas. Wolfenstein 3d game out, and now thousands of FPS are produced every year. I''m not going to a publisher, no. If I wanted to get the game published, I would probably just have it published with Andre Lamoth''s company. Now, if I really believed that nobody else has thought of anything close to my idea I would be pretty naive. However, I have been searching around a little (a lot) and have had no luck finding something that could be considered really close. So this leaves 3 possiblities: 1)Nobody has thought of the idea, 2)Somebody has thought of it but did nothing about it, 3)Somebody has thought of the idea, tried to do something about it, but the idea sucked, and they got nowhere with it. So, if it turns out to be number 1 or number 2 then I''m set. If it turns out to be number 3, well, I''m only "losing" time, and it''s more "using" time to learn than flat out losing it.

#5 Jeranon   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 05:49 PM

There''s one more.

4) Somebody has thought up the idea, but is keeping it secret for fear of someone else stealing the idea.


#6 Akura   Members   -  Reputation: 130

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Posted 26 June 2000 - 10:07 PM

well, sometimes ppl forget they can try finding investors, since they are easir to get some $$ out of them with ideas




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