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On Publisher Reputations


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#21 chronos   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 17 July 2000 - 12:40 PM

quote:
Original post by cyberben
Here in Canada we have the Better Business Burea (BBB) Which I believe may also cover the United States.



Thank you for bringing that up. I believe the BBB does indeed service the United States as well. Their website is at "http://www.bbb.com". Possibly a valuable resource for those considering a business relationship.



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#22 DavidRM   Members   -  Reputation: 270

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Posted 17 July 2000 - 03:30 PM

Chronos,

No, the public does *not* have a right to know. In almost all cases, the information is covered under non-disclosure agreements and business contracts. Not only does the disbursement of information such as you seem to want to "ferret out" constitute a breach in contract, it can also be construed as libel. And once things hit the "libel" category, the lawyers come a-calling. It''s not pretty.

Thus, as I said before, the information you want cannot reasonably be obtained by posting messages on public forums. You will need to contact the people directly involved and convince them to disclose it to you...off the record, of course, because anything else leaves them liable. And good luck on doing that if you''re not either a personal contact, or at most a contact of a contact.

If a developer is going to enter an agreement with a publisher, it is up to that developer to do whatever research they deem necessary prior to signing anything. If you are the developer, and want to find out about how the publisher treats its developers, you can (a) ask the publisher for a list of references you can check, and/or (b) ask other people you know in the industry to put you in contact with someone who has done business with the publisher. Asking for such information in a public forum is going to result in a signal to noise ratio that is ''way off the scope, and possibly generate enough negative "vibe" that the publisher just pulls the plug on your agreement. After all, why deal with an unprofessional developer more interested in controversy than in getting the job done?

No respectable game development web page will ever maintain a list of "good" and "bad" publishers. The risk of legal liability for creating such a list far outweighs any benefits there might come from it.

I hope this adequately explains my position on this topic.


DavidRM
Samu Games


#23 chronos   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 17 July 2000 - 05:40 PM

DavidRM,

I couldn't disagree more. I strongly believe the public most certainly *does* have a right to know when a publisher behaves unethically. I believe in the value of public information on bad business, like a sort of consumer watchdog. As for libel, I believe this requires false claims to be made as if they were statements of fact. Finally, non-disclosure agreements mean squat when the circumstances are such that providing protected information is necessary to prove your case. No confidentiality agreement can prevent me from seeking action against a company.

You attribute to me the desire to "ferret out" information. I'm going to ask you to please not assign to me imagined intentions. I've no desire to ferret out anything. Read my posts very carefully. All I'm saying is there are certain situations in which a confidentiality agreement should not apply. Perhaps we're imagining different circumstances and different kinds of details being disclosed?

Edited by - chronos on July 18, 2000 4:01:55 AM




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